Audiobus: Use your music apps together.

What is Audiobus?Audiobus is an award-winning music app for iPhone and iPad which lets you use your other music apps together. Chain effects on your favourite synth, run the output of apps or Audio Units into an app like GarageBand or Loopy, or select a different audio interface output for each app. Route MIDI between apps — drive a synth from a MIDI sequencer, or add an arpeggiator to your MIDI keyboard — or sync with your external MIDI gear. And control your entire setup from a MIDI controller.

Download on the App Store

Audiobus is the app that makes the rest of your setup better.

ID700 IS HERE

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Comments

  • @ElektrikDiva said:
    is there a way to sync what tweaking I have already done al9ng with patch that I am currently using in the standalone mode with the Au3 version in AUM so that both patches are identically in sync at all times?

    ugh, that was working at one point. looking into it now.

  • version 1.1 was just approved on the app store and should be available now. changelog:

    • Add Changelog
    • Prevent iOS from going to sleep while standalone is running
    • Preset updates / typo fixes
    • Documentation updates / typo fixes
    • Reduce app bundle size by 33%
    • Fix blank About / Documentation links in AUv3
    • Tuning installation is now a manual process (fixes the ipad air/mini crashes)
  • excellent app, so far its app of the year for me.

  • edited April 16

    Enjoying finding my way around ... manual is overall pretty good, but I'm confused about a couple of things to do with the synth architecture\signal path - hopefully someone can help put me right:

    The Overview section in the manual is a bit brief for me and leaves me with a few questions e.g.

    • I haven't yet found a simple explanation of what some of the modules actually are e.g.
    1. is an Index just a custom envelope generator modulation source?
    2. What wave type is produced by the Oscillator?
    3. Does "oscillator" mean the same as it does in other synths?
    • In the Algorithm view, what do the connections signify? Are these modulation inputs? Ring modulation inputs? etc ... e.g. when an Index flows into an Oscillator, what is the Index doing? e.g. in Algorithm 1, Index 2 flows into Oscillator 4, but what is that doing? Oscillator 4 modulation shows as "none" in the DeFault patch, so maybe the Index is doing something hardwired?

    Kinda confused, but then I don't know much abotu West Coast synth architecture ... any insights appreciated thanks!

  • @craftycurate said:
    Enjoying finding my way around ... manual is overall pretty good, but I'm confused about a couple of things to do with the synth architecture\signal path - hopefully someone can help put me right:

    The Overview section in the manual is a bit brief for me and leaves me with a few questions e.g.

    • I haven't yet found a simple explanation of what some of the modules actually are e.g.
    1. is an Index just a custom envelope generator modulation source?
    2. What wave type is produced by the Oscillator?
    3. Does "oscillator" mean the same as it does in other synths?
    • In the Algorithm view, what do the connections signify? Are these modulation inputs? Ring modulation inputs? etc ... e.g. when an Index flows into an Oscillator, what is the Index doing? e.g. in Algorithm 1, Index 2 flows into Oscillator 4, but what is that doing? Oscillator 4 modulation shows as "none" in the DeFault patch, so maybe the Index is doing something hardwired?

    Kinda confused, but then I don't know much abotu West Coast synth architecture ... any insights appreciated thanks!

    I think you will find that downloading and re-reading the pdf will answer all your questions. Jonathan provides pretty clear explanations about what the symbols in the algorithm charts mean and how the signal flows.

    Indexes are essentially vca’s with a built-in envelope rather than just being an envelope. They are used like envelopes but they also act on what is fed to them whereas an envelope generates a control signal but takes no input other than a trigger.

    There is a detailed description in the manual about how to read the algorithm charts. Signal flow is generally bottom to top.

    The modulation slot you mention provides for an additional modulator besides the index. To see what effect it has, choose “timbre cc74” as the modulator and slide your finger up and down a key on the built in controller.

    Yes, oscillator means the same as in other synths. These are sine waves (as in a DX7).

  • edited April 16

    sounds great, currently unusably crashy for me on an Air2, better performance on an Air4, main issues seem to be cpu spikes & switching presets

  • edited April 16

    @craftycurate said:
    in Algorithm 1, Index 2 flows into Oscillator 4, but what is that doing?

    maybe you could read section 4.1 again: oscillator 4 is obviously a mere signal carrier and its output feeds index 2, which in turn modulates index 3 — the triangles show the direction of the signal flow…

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/dl/slwfk5rbmcxa4ig/ID700 1.1 Manual.pdf

  • Thanks for sharing that - I have an older version of the manual that doesn’t have those, nice!

  • edited April 16

    oh, yes: those were pasted from Buchla 700 archeology by Johan Boberg

  • edited April 16

    @espiegel123 said:

    @craftycurate said:
    Enjoying finding my way around ... manual is overall pretty good, but I'm confused about a couple of things to do with the synth architecture\signal path - hopefully someone can help put me right:

    The Overview section in the manual is a bit brief for me and leaves me with a few questions e.g.

    • I haven't yet found a simple explanation of what some of the modules actually are e.g.
    1. is an Index just a custom envelope generator modulation source?
    2. What wave type is produced by the Oscillator?
    3. Does "oscillator" mean the same as it does in other synths?
    • In the Algorithm view, what do the connections signify? Are these modulation inputs? Ring modulation inputs? etc ... e.g. when an Index flows into an Oscillator, what is the Index doing? e.g. in Algorithm 1, Index 2 flows into Oscillator 4, but what is that doing? Oscillator 4 modulation shows as "none" in the DeFault patch, so maybe the Index is doing something hardwired?

    Kinda confused, but then I don't know much abotu West Coast synth architecture ... any insights appreciated thanks!

    I think you will find that downloading and re-reading the pdf will answer all your questions. Jonathan provides pretty clear explanations about what the symbols in the algorithm charts mean and how the signal flows.

    Indexes are essentially vca’s with a built-in envelope rather than just being an envelope. They are used like envelopes but they also act on what is fed to them whereas an envelope generates a control signal but takes no input other than a trigger.

    There is a detailed description in the manual about how to read the algorithm charts. Signal flow is generally bottom to top.

    The modulation slot you mention provides for an additional modulator besides the index. To see what effect it has, choose “timbre cc74” as the modulator and slide your finger up and down a key on the built in controller.

    Yes, oscillator means the same as in other synths. These are sine waves (as in a DX7).

    @RockBottom said:

    @craftycurate said:
    in Algorithm 1, Index 2 flows into Oscillator 4, but what is that doing?

    maybe you could read section 4.1 again: oscillator 4 is obviously a mere signal carrier and its output feeds index 2, which in turn modulates index 3 — the triangles show the direction of the signal flow…
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/dl/slwfk5rbmcxa4ig/ID700 1.1 Manual.pdf

    Thanks for those ... I always read the manual before asking for help but had missed a couple of key points :)

    It was also version 1.0 of the manual which lacks the algorithm diagrams and some other useful material in v1.1 so other early purchasers might wish to redownload too.

  • I’m actually enjoying the manual!. What have you done to me... :s
    It’s very well written and explained. The algorithm thing is still a mystery, I can’t see what goes where or understand the flow, but at least the manual allows you to understand each modules possibilities, and man is thing deep!. So funnily seems like in this case I find it easier to understand the pieces and not the big picture. Is this a thing with FM synthesis?.

  • @tahiche said:
    I’m actually enjoying the manual!. What have you done to me... :s
    It’s very well written and explained. The algorithm thing is still a mystery, I can’t see what goes where or understand the flow, but at least the manual allows you to understand each modules possibilities, and man is thing deep!. So funnily seems like in this case I find it easier to understand the pieces and not the big picture. Is this a thing with FM synthesis?.

    What about the flow don’t you understand? In the algorithm flow chart, signal flows starting from the bottom upwards and with the exception of the timbre, signal enters the bottom and leaves out the top.

    If you can explain where things get fuzzy, we can clarify and that might be useful for the dev to know in future manual revisions.

    Maybe pick an algorithm, and ask questions about what isn’t clear...we will all probably learn from the process.

  • If one isn't sure about how FM synthesis works, it will definitely be worth one's while to spend a little time getting familiar with its basics. I disagree with conventional wisdom that FM is hard to learn/understand -- but if one has mostly spent time learning subtractive synths it may seem hard -- but that is largely because it is different from what one is used to -- and FM does work differently.

    With subtractive synths, you start with rich waveforms and remove stuff with filters. (Btw, lots of FM synths, including ID700, have a subtractive filter towards the end of the signal flow).

    With FM (and AM and other types of synthesis that use audio rate modulation), you generally start with simple waveforms (often just a sine wave) and create rich timbres [harmonics/sidebands/partials they go by a lot of names] by using an audio rate signal (usually another oscillator) to modify (modulate) some aspect. If you use an oscillator to modify another oscillator's pitch (frequency), you are doing FM synthesis.

    Audio rate modulation of an oscillator creates harmonics (timbral richness). The exact harmonics added depend on what aspect of the oscillator you are modulating (pitch or amplitude or phase...) you are modulating, the frequency of the modulation and the relative signal levels of the two oscillators.

    If you are just getting used to FM, a good place to start out is with just two active oscillators (the oscillator whose output you will hear is the "carrier", the modulating oscillator is the "modulator").

    Start with the modulator at a 1:1 pitch ratio (i.e. the modulator at the same frequency as the carrier) and an amplitude (level) of 0. Now raise the level and notice how the carrier's timbre changes.

    Now, put an envelope on the modulator to ramp it up or down to change the harmonics. This will act similar to a filter envelope.

    Remove the envelope and set the modulator's level to be reasonably high.

    Change the ratio of the modulator and sweep it. Notice how the timbre changes. When the ratio is not a whole number, you get lots of non-harmonic (i.e. not a multiple of the fundamental) harmonics/partials/sidebands. Notice even and odd ratios have different characters.

    Play around with how changing the modulator's amplitude (level/loudness) AND frequency can change things.

    Even with just a two oscillator setup, this will keep you busy for a while. Spend some time developing a feel for the timbres you can create with two oscillators.

    I think there is a temptation to jump into exploring complex algorithms before one has become familiar with the simpler cases -- and so it all seems bewildering.

  • Good post @espiegel123. I'm so glad that I had the background of learning PhaseMaker and then KQ Dixie before this. If FM is mystifying, those two (especially PhaseMaker) are an excellent place to start. I'm also super thankful for the awesome manual on this one! But I think I'd be totally lost if I didn't have a basic understanding of FM built up from different apps.

    I hate to bring Drambo into this, but an even easier way to get a feel for FM is just to start with two FM operators, one feeding the next (the FM Bass instrument rack preset is already set up this way). That gives a way to explore the most simple FM interaction without being distracted by lots of different algorithms.

    Now ... for what I really wanted to say: I LOVE THIS SYNTH!! I mean it. To me this is the biggest breath of fresh air for synthesis in a long time. In fact, I had decided I wasn't going to buy any more synths because I havre so many that cover so much of the same territory. Not so with this one. And, to my great surprise, I think it's not only unique, but will be hella useful - not just for weird stuff, but for practical sounds too.

    Thank you @modosc! GREAT work!

  • Btw, until I read the manual last night, I hadn't realized that it has a really nice baked-in MIDI CC implementation -- in addition to having lots of things available via AU parameter automation (like the harmonics of the wave shapers).

  • I nominate the white dots that animate the progress through envelopes as the most helpful, elegant, "why doesn't everyone do that??" user interface innovation I've seen in a very long time.

  • I enjoyed listening to this guy. Just skip over the programmerish stuff and listen to him describe what fm is all about.

  • @wim said:
    I nominate the white dots that animate the progress through envelopes as the most helpful, elegant, "why doesn't everyone do that??" user interface innovation I've seen in a very long time.

    Such a nice bit of visual feedback. Reminds me a bit of the swarm of dots in the Aparillo synth.

  • @NeuM said:

    @wim said:
    I nominate the white dots that animate the progress through envelopes as the most helpful, elegant, "why doesn't everyone do that??" user interface innovation I've seen in a very long time.

    Such a nice bit of visual feedback. Reminds me a bit of the swarm of dots in the Aparillo synth.

    Definitely, to both these comments

  • @wim said:
    I nominate the white dots that animate the progress through envelopes as the most helpful, elegant, "why doesn't everyone do that??" user interface innovation I've seen in a very long time.

    AD Continua has it on LFOs, and I think they added it to Quanta as well.

  • @wim said:
    I nominate the white dots that animate the progress through envelopes as the most helpful, elegant, "why doesn't everyone do that??" user interface innovation I've seen in a very long time.

    That my first comment on this thing. Extremely useful to connect what you hear (which is often hard) with what you tweak.
    I can recall Rozeta particles and FRMS granular using dots like that, but in this it’s a lot more meaningful and important for the experience.
    Price winner.

  • @espiegel123 said:
    If one isn't sure about how FM synthesis works, it will definitely be worth one's while to spend a little time getting familiar with its basics. I disagree with conventional wisdom that FM is hard to learn/understand -- but if one has mostly spent time learning subtractive synths it may seem hard -- but that is largely because it is different from what one is used to -- and FM does work differently.

    Great post thanks. Some of my confusion is definitely connected to my low level of understanding about FM synthesis.

  • R_2R_2
    edited April 17

    @wim said:
    I nominate the white dots that animate the progress through envelopes as the most helpful, elegant, "why doesn't everyone do that??" user interface innovation I've seen in a very long time.

    Huh? First time i saw this was 9 years ago on WaveGenerator and I’m sure there’s others before that.

  • wimwim
    edited April 17

    @R_2 said:

    @wim said:
    I nominate the white dots that animate the progress through envelopes as the most helpful, elegant, "why doesn't everyone do that??" user interface innovation I've seen in a very long time.

    Huh? First time i saw this was 9 years ago on WaveGenerator and I’m sure there’s others before that.

    I wasn't saying it was the first or only. I was just appreciating it.

    This is a little bit more informative than just showing the progress through the envelope as some of the others do. I like how the dots represent both the progress through the envelope and the current actual value. For instance if there's a base value of, say 4.82 for the parameter, the dot rests at 4.82 when the envelope is at zero. I find this very helpful.

    Anyway, I just really appreciate that feature. I would love to see it in more apps.

  • edited April 17

    It appears to me that the Korg OP Six can do similar things. I wonder if the Buchla 700 inspired at least part of the Korg design.

  • Lost hours tonight with morphing drones running through a 32 second IR capture from a cistern. I set up cc mapping to the waveshaper slots and ran slow LFOs into them while I turned and twisted knobs to control other parameters.

  • edited April 18

    @espiegel123 : that sounds fun! :) Any chance of you posting the results to SoundCloud or similar? (Even better if it were YouTube so I could see how you did it) I would love to hear those. :)

  • @espiegel123 said:
    Lost hours tonight with morphing drones running through a 32 second IR capture from a cistern. I set up cc mapping to the waveshaper slots and ran slow LFOs into them while I turned and twisted knobs to control other parameters.

    Sounds great for sure

  • @Svetlovska said:
    @espiegel123 : that sounds fun! :) Any chance of you posting the results to SoundCloud or similar? (Even better if it were YouTube so I could see how you did it) I would love to hear those. :)

    I will record and post something ...first I need to finish building some tools I am using to control the many parameters in the way that I’d like.

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