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Learning guitar

edited August 18 in Off-topic

Working on self learning guitar (again). I’m a decent keys player and can read music and play by “ear.” I’ve stopped and started learning guitar a few times.
Question is- is there a good place to start - strumming exercises? Switching between chords exercises? Learning how to play specific popular songs? Etc...
Thanks in advance for any advice!

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Comments

  • Andy Guitar on YouTube is pretty good, worked to get me strumming and picking a bit and I started from zero.

  • If I had to start learning guitar again, I would only play with my fingers. For any style.

  • What style(s) of music do you want to learn????

    Could get you the right help quicker... 😊

  • To leverage your existing musicianship in the most efficient way, learn to play melodies on a single string at a time. This is how most string instruments in the world are played. One string melodies can be taken to incredible heights. Check out any good sitar player for example.

    That said, if you want to play harmony, then you just start memorizing chord voicings and progressions.

  • Also, acoustic or electric. I've learned a great deal from Marty schwartz:

    He also does electric and excellent blues.

  • justinguitar.com

    That's where I finally learned to play and sing at the same time a couple months ago, after owning a guitar for ... 29 years! I followed the free lessons, didn't use the app or anything.

  • @SNystrom said:
    What style(s) of music do you want to learn????

    Could get you the right help quicker... 😊

    If I could play every John Mayer song...
    He can play so many different styles...

  • Sample the teachers on YouTube and find one that gets you excited to practice.
    Use all 4 fingers on your left and all 5 on the right (switch advice if you're a lefty).

    C-A-G-E-D shapes (major, minor, dominant 7th), diminished) are helpful to learn the neck.

    Major, minor, pentatonic, blues scales.

    Learn real songs and when you can perform, record.

    It will hurt and then suddenly it won't.

  • When practicing, ALWAYS use a metronome! 🤗

  • For me personally, learn chords and how to switch through them helped me the most and then learning some songs that I like. Mostly oasis...

  • Here's one for you:

    Also do a YouTube search for: Play Like John Mayer

    There are tons of lessons there...

  • Learn songs. That way you’ll actually enjoy what you’re doing. But also practice scales, chords, and warm ups.

    Learn where the notes are on the fingerboard early on. Seeing as you already know theory from the keys, this will make it way easier to get up to speed.

    Enjoy the different chord voicings on guitar.

    Consider a teacher. Lessons will really help you focus, and to iron out bad habits early.

  • I'm a big fan of truefire's guitar lessons. I have been learning to play guitar with these courses since 2012 and it's absolutely helpful. So I could recomend to start with truefire's free course for beginner. Just because it's a real gems!
    https://truefire.com/learn-guitar/1-first-steps-for-beginners/c1034

    Also you could try YourGuitarSage's FIRST 30 Guitar Lessons or JustinGuitar website.

  • I had one "lesson", my friend's mum, while she was ironing. Her advice:

    1. Don't look at your fingers
    2. Practice switching chords smoothly

    That was the best advice for playing solo. I used to practice in the dark.

    I would also add:

    1. Play with other people

    Generally good advice anyway but, when it comes to music, playing with others develops your hearing and timing abilities.

    1. Get used to recording yourself playing

    You are your own harshest critic. Hearing the recording exposes where you need to improve.

    If you still don't get anywhere:

    1. Learn the ukulele instead. It's much easier!
    • Since you can read music and play by ear too, memorize chord patterns and transpose them by moving up the fingerboard—1 fret = 1 semitone. If you strum the chord without any open strings, this transpose method will always work.
    • No need to press your left hand too hard. Usually, people press unnecessarily hard. The left thumb of a classical guitarist, for example, can barely touch the back of the neck and he'd still be able to play it.
    • Grow your right-hand fingernails a bit—not too long though because they'll just get in the way and is hard to control the tone and speed, and learn to play fingerstyle in addition to strumming. It will come handy often. 👍
  • To begin with just learn to change chords smoothly. This is probably the most fundamental skill. Once you can do this it's easy to learn songs, at which point the process becomes a lot more fun, especially if you can sing a bit as well.

  • @bigcatrik said:
    justinguitar.com

    That's where I finally learned to play and sing at the same time a couple months ago, after owning a guitar for ... 29 years! I followed the free lessons, didn't use the app or anything.

    It is really amazing what you can get for free on the Internet just for watching a few ads and pitching a few bucks for extras, if you want them (like a tip jar). I have been playing on and off for years and keep coming back to Justin Sandercoe's lessons. Very great place to start with a fantastic supporting website in addition to his YouTube channel.

  • @SNystrom said:
    When practicing, ALWAYS use a metronome! 🤗

    And always always always start slow. :)

  • @bigcatrik said:
    justinguitar.com

    That's where I finally learned to play and sing at the same time a couple months ago, after owning a guitar for ... 29 years! I followed the free lessons, didn't use the app or anything.

    MrsChasteen seconds justinguitar.
    She swears by him (not at him)

  • Play in open tunings and watch movies, television, cartoons, whatever in order to avoid watching your hands and thinking too much.

  • I like justinguitar.com a lot too.

  • youtube for songs you'd like to play is probably the best and enjoyable way.
    but seriously, look at you fingers.

  • Same as learning to play new pieces on keyboard instruments - work on getting it right at a slowed down tempo at first, then build up speed.

    Think of strumming in terms of learning to read music - start with quarter notes, move to eighth notes, work on tests, introduce dotted notes when you’re ready, etc. Just take it slowly and build up a step at a time.

    Find some simple songs to learn chords - work on 3 chord songs with very common chords at first then add other chords slowly.

    It’s not too hard to follow a similar pattern to learning keyboard skills.

  • Thanks for all the great advice!!! I knew there were some good guitar players on this forum :)

  • edited August 18

    @ReflectiveHaze said:
    Working on self learning guitar (again). I’m a decent keys player and can read music and play by “ear.” I’ve stopped and started learning guitar a few times.
    Question is- is there a good place to start - strumming exercises? Switching between chords exercises? Learning how to play specific popular songs? Etc...
    Thanks in advance for any advice!

    Yeah, just pick a couple of songs you want to learn, and start learning the chords for them. That way you're learning an actual song and also practicing switching between chords at the same time. That's how I got started on guitar.

    If the song you pick is well known enough, you can probably find a guitar lesson for playing that song on Youtube.

    I also like Truefire a lot but as it's a paid service, you need to have a clearer idea of what direction you want to take your guitar studies. Satisfied customers tend to be people who already knew what they wanted to learn (eg. country, blues, jazz or whatever).

  • edited August 18

    Picking up some good practice habits from Justin guitar! And my fingers hurt…

  • I taught myself 20 years ago, no YouTube, by printing out tabs to songs from Ultimate Guitar Tab Archive, I think it was called at the time, and learning them. I tried to pick easy songs so I could get the the rhythm and strumming as much as learning chords. I learned almost the entire album Nirvana Unplugged in NY. There’s a lot of songs out there that are 4-8 simple chords for the entire song. Start playing at a slow tempo to get chords and changes down, then speed up when to song tempo when ready.

    The ultimate guitar app used to be a paid app but is now mostly free with some “Not necessarily needed” in app purchases but you can search the entire tab database for any song you can think of, and you’ll find most of them. They have chord diagrams at the top of every song, you can make the page auto move down as you play, you can also hear the sound of the chords by tapping on them, and look at all the different ways to play the same chord. I still use this app to this day. After you find a song, select the chord tab with most stars. There’s also Bass, ukulele, pro version, etc.. but start with the chord version. If the song is too complicated there is an option to simplify it which makes it a lot easier to learn harder songs when you’re a beginner.

    https://apps.apple.com/us/app/ultimate-guitar-chords-tabs/id357828853

  • @ReflectiveHaze said:
    And my fingers hurt…

    Congratulations! You're on the right path! 😉

  • The technique I've been using since the ’70s is to prop it up in the corner of the room.

  • @u0421793 said:
    The technique I've been using since the ’70s is to prop it up in the corner of the room.

    That's the proven way of avoiding sore fingers.

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