Audiobus: Use your music apps together.

What is Audiobus?Audiobus is an award-winning music app for iPhone and iPad which lets you use your other music apps together. Chain effects on your favourite synth, run the output of apps or Audio Units into an app like GarageBand or Loopy, or select a different audio interface output for each app. Route MIDI between apps — drive a synth from a MIDI sequencer, or add an arpeggiator to your MIDI keyboard — or sync with your external MIDI gear. And control your entire setup from a MIDI controller.

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Audiobus is the app that makes the rest of your setup better.

Arturia V Collection: Fair iOS Pricing

I am speaking this into existence hoping Arturia will see this and make it a reality or already has it in the works!

How much per synth is fair for the Arturia V Collection?

I’m thinking $19.99 per app and $299 for the Collection.

What are your thoughts?

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Comments

  • edited January 10

    That's pretty much their desktop prices on sale, so seems reasonable. They recently switched their apps to use Juce 6, so theoretically possible, but I wouldn't hold my breath. Also, the UIs are very detailed, so as much as I would want too, I don't know how well they would work for touchscreen. I recommend buying on desktop.

  • Nope. Way to much. I wouldn’t touch it at that price.

  • I would definitely buy some of them for $19.99 a pop if they’re audio units. I actually bought the V collection when it was on sale and I only use a few of the synths so I don’t see myself buying the V collection for IPad because I already have a ton of synths I don’t use . I did also buy Pigments, that one would be an insta buy for me if it came to the IPad. What I’d also love to see come to the IPad is Serum.

  • Would definitely pay that “IF” they were done properly. I wholeheartedly support any effort to get these onto an ipad. I have most of the V Collection on desktop and love them.

  • @Apex said:
    Would definitely pay that “IF” they were done properly. I wholeheartedly support any effort to get these onto an ipad. I have most of the V Collection on desktop and love them.

    Touché

  • A couple of thoughts for apps in general if higher prices are to be paid, long term support needs to be reliable, in regards to Arturia V Collection and other desktop software, but not all, you can often resell it, here in iOS land that really a no go. So higher prices can maintain a certain resell value.

  • "What is a fair price for a non-existent product?" is a perfect question for this forum tbh. :)

  • edited January 11

    These topics are keep coming back in various forms... pricing, sustainability, polls, roundtables...
    I’m sure I’m missing something, but to me it’s not clear at all, why do ‘you’ think major players are coming our way from desktop (other than wishful thinking)? How would you pitch this platform to an established manufacturer?
    Compared to desktop:

    • it’s a less than ideal OS (f.e no way to downgrade OS or apps)
    • less than ideal file system / access
    • considerably smaller market
    • for considerably smaller revenue

    On top of that, most manufacturers already have to rework their existing products to run natively on the latest MacOS, which probably will grant them access to iOS in the future.
    If anything, imo the direction of travel is the other way around... iOS developers are moving towards desktops.

  • @0tolerance4silence said:
    These topics are keep coming back in various forms... pricing, sustainability, polls, roundtables...
    I’m sure I’m missing something, but to me it’s not clear at all, why do ‘you’ think major players are coming our way from desktop (other than wishful thinking)? How would you pitch this platform to an established manufacturer?
    Compared to desktop:

    • it’s a less than ideal OS (f.e no way to downgrade OS or apps)
    • less than ideal file system / access
    • considerably smaller market
    • for considerably smaller revenue

    On top of that, most manufacturers already have to rework their existing products to run natively on the latest MacOS, which probably will grant them access to iOS in the future.
    If anything, imo the direction of travel is the other way around... iOS developers are moving towards desktops.

    Good points 👍

  • edited January 11

    @ervin said:
    "What is a fair price for a non-existent product?" is a perfect question for this forum tbh. :)

    The answer: Things are worth whatever people are willing to pay for them. ;)

  • $19.99 for individual apps seems more than fair to me. And I wouldn't expect a universal AUv3 offering across iOS and macOS for that low price. But I would only consider purchasing Arturia apps on iOS if they were developed and supported by Arturia directly.

  • edited January 11

    I might pay $5 each. $50 for the lot. I suppose that's more an indication of how individual aural perception can be. I've owned a few Arturias on desktop. Demoed almost everything. Not for me. I sort of wish I kept the ARP though as it was fun.

  • What is fair pricing?
    Is it the price for the time dev spent coding the app adjusted by the market tendencies or should it be set depending on how much money you have to spend by the end of the month?

  • @supadom said:
    What is fair pricing?
    Is it the price for the time dev spent coding the app adjusted by the market tendencies or should it be set depending on how much money you have to spend by the end of the month?

    In truth, any smart business bases the price it charges to be at the percieved value their product commands in the open marketplace. And in the end, the market will let it know whether it's charging too much. Unfortunately, it rarely informs the business that they're charging too little!

    And funnily enough, both our statements amount to the same thing. :)

  • Most importantly, if iOS was lucrative we would see more apps from Arturia.

  • @Stuntman_mike said:
    Most importantly, if iOS was lucrative we would see more apps from Arturia.

    I don’t think it’s possible to know such a thing. Consider that prior to them getting kicked off the App Store, the game Fortnite was reportedly pulling in $2 million a day for them. One never knows if an app is going to be a hit or a dud until it’s made and delivered.

  • Looking at the version history of Arturia apps it seems they gave up putting effort into iOS about 5 years ago. They tried, but sales figures were disappointing probably. I don't blame them. If they sell zillions of desktop apps and hardware the iOS simply does not worth the effort.
    I think the situation is the same with Ableton, Logic, etc.

  • Just port Arturia’s CS-80 and I’ll be happy!

  • If I was Arturia, I'd want to wait for a 'proper' DAW to emerge on iOS.

    Too many of the existing ones are unreliable at best with hosting auv3s and none of them are exactly compelling compared to what you can get on desktop.

    We all know that there are lots of cool alternatives with AUM/LP/Drambo etc. But back in the real world, companies like Arturia are looking at the iOS landscape and thinking if it's so great, why aren't there any decent DAWs?

  • @klownshed said:
    If I was Arturia, I'd want to wait for a 'proper' DAW to emerge on iOS.

    Too many of the existing ones are unreliable at best with hosting auv3s and none of them are exactly compelling compared to what you can get on desktop.

    We all know that there are lots of cool alternatives with AUM/LP/Drambo etc. But back in the real world, companies like Arturia are looking at the iOS landscape and thinking if it's so great, why aren't there any decent DAWs?

    Agreed, I don’t feel short of effects or instruments, I would like a significantly better DAW (Steinberg are certainly making progress, LP looks to have much potential in a different way).

  • The lack of a truly competitive DAW on iPadOS is definitely the major negative for me. Modern iPadOS hardware is capable of hosting a DAW with the power of Logic/Live/FL Studio/Cubase/Bitwig etc. And Bitwig is already optimised for touch gestures - great if you have a Windows tablet but sadly lacking on iPadOS.

    https://www.bitwig.com/de/stories/touch-bitwig-studio-107/

    I'd be happy to pay $10-15 a month for Bitwig on iOS if it was ever made available. I know many hate subscriptions, but the vendors need a return on their investment and a desktop-class DAW on iOS would be a major investment in developer time. I stopped subscribing to my main Adobe Cloud account since getting the latest M1 iPad Pro and now pay £12 a month for the Photoshop/Illustrator bundle on iOS. Sure I miss After Effects and Premiere (but I have my old CS6 Master Suite installed on my desktop workstation and that covers my occasional mograph needs).

    In truth, I'd never been tempted away from a desktop DAW environment entirely (it's as much about a desktop-class OS as it is a desktop-call DAW) but I'd certainly be happier to produce some output to completion solely on iPadOS if I had something with the power of Ableton/Bitwig on iPadOS.

    And if the iOS ecosystem had a desktop-class DAW, I strongly suspect developers like Arturia would be more likely to support the platform, although I think you'd also see upward pricing trends as AUv3s on iOS would be perceived to have fewer limitations.

  • @Stuntman_mike said:
    Most importantly, if iOS was lucrative we would see more apps from Arturia.

    Pigments 🤞🏼

  • The lack of a desktop-quality DAW is more a symptom of the cause than the source. The economics of iOS music-production is way worse than most here seem to realize. The relatively incremental changes in Auria in the few years -- and even Cubasis compared to its desktop cousin -- and the more or less abandonment of Nanonstudio 2 -- you get a picture of how bad the economics are. While one can argue that Steinberg continues advancing Cubasis on iOS (which is undeniably true), one also sees that the advances are fairly incremental -- many key features that one takes for granted in desktop DAWs are nowhere evident -- though they will probably eventually happen. Given that Steinberg already has the in-house expertise to implement those features and that they are not dummies, the only reasonable conclusion is that the market has shown them that it isn't economically advisable to dump a lot of resources into fast-tracking a desktop-level app.

    While there are a handful of people here that insist they will happily pay a reasonable price for a desktop quality DAW -- the evidence so far is that there isn't a sufficient number of such folks. Maybe a product will come along that will change that, but I am skeptical.

    (And Apple doesn't make it any easier with the App Store model or their haphazard quality control of the OS's audio/music frameworks).

  • @klownshed said:
    If I was Arturia, I'd want to wait for a 'proper' DAW to emerge on iOS.

    Too many of the existing ones are unreliable at best with hosting auv3s and none of them are exactly compelling compared to what you can get on desktop.

    We all know that there are lots of cool alternatives with AUM/LP/Drambo etc. But back in the real world, companies like Arturia are looking at the iOS landscape and thinking if it's so great, why aren't there any decent DAWs?

    NS2 is extremely stable, but no audio tracks 😞

  • @NeuM said:

    @Stuntman_mike said:
    Most importantly, if iOS was lucrative we would see more apps from Arturia.

    I don’t think it’s possible to know such a thing. Consider that prior to them getting kicked off the App Store, the game Fortnite was reportedly pulling in $2 million a day for them. One never knows if an app is going to be a hit or a dud until it’s made and delivered.

    That's a game with zillions of micro transactions. Completely different audience. Most f2p games on ios out sale music apps because of their business model and audience appeal.

  • @Lil_Stu07 said:

    @NeuM said:

    @Stuntman_mike said:
    Most importantly, if iOS was lucrative we would see more apps from Arturia.

    I don’t think it’s possible to know such a thing. Consider that prior to them getting kicked off the App Store, the game Fortnite was reportedly pulling in $2 million a day for them. One never knows if an app is going to be a hit or a dud until it’s made and delivered.

    That's a game with zillions of micro transactions. Completely different audience. Most f2p games on ios out sale music apps because of their business model and audience appeal.

    Yes, let's focus on only the parts of the comparison which are the least important part of the comparison...

  • Face it. The user base for music apps is nowhere near that of games (for instance) plus most users of music apps aren’t interested in paying a “fair price”. That’s not a recipe for success.

  • I've been using the V-Collection on a Windows tablet for a while now and I must say that it's a very mixed bag.
    Most synths have UI areas that are barely usable using a finger, and having to use a stylus most of the time isn't comparable to the typical iPad experience we're used to.
    It's obvious that Arturia haven't designed their desktop apps with touch operation in mind.
    Porting their apps to iOS will require massive UI changes and that usually means a lot of work for a developer.

  • I have the V collection on Mac and i like it.

    I don’t feel I’m missing out too much on iOS though. Synths are an area in which we are pretty spoiled already!

    Unless there was an attractive cross grade I wouldn’t be in a hurry to buy it again for iOS.

    To be honest I quite like having iOS and Mac completely separate. Once you have the same apps on both you can’t help but want cross compatibility so you can have projects open on either platform. And that is a recipe for frustration and disappointment!

  • @klownshed said:
    I have the V collection on Mac and i like it.

    I don’t feel I’m missing out too much on iOS though. Synths are an area in which we are pretty spoiled already!

    Unless there was an attractive cross grade I wouldn’t be in a hurry to buy it again for iOS.

    To be honest I quite like having iOS and Mac completely separate. Once you have the same apps on both you can’t help but want cross compatibility so you can have projects open on either platform. And that is a recipe for frustration and disappointment!

    100%

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