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OT: Arvo Pärt: Where to start?

Looking for insight/suggestions as to his work/things you like/would recommend etc. I am, es ever, a johnny-come-lately.

Comments

  • edited February 15

    Two of my favourites:

    • Fratres (esp piano & violin version)
    • Spiegel im Spiegel (minimal masterpiece) - translates as “The mirror in the mirror”

    I don’t know his choral works so well, but I prefer the simpler pieces. Hauntingly beautiful.

  • @craftycurate said:
    Two of my favourites:

    • Fratres (esp piano & violin version)
    • Spiegel im Spiegel (minimal masterpiece) - translates as “The mirror in the mirror”

    I don’t know his choral works so well, but I prefer the simpler pieces. Hauntingly beautiful.

    I super agree with those. Tabula Rasa is my favorite piece of his.

  • @raindro said:
    I super agree with those. Tabula Rasa is my favorite piece of his.

    Just dug it out on Spotify - good recommendtation. Is that a prepared piano at the beginning of the second movement?

  • DCJDCJ
    edited February 15

    Oh my god.... OH MY GOD. This is the best question I’ve ever seen on the forum! EVER!

    Spiegel im spiegel is definitely a classic and easily one of my favorites.

    I think the best start is Portrait:

    Of all the collections, this is the one I come back to the most.

  • Te Deum or go home:

  • Kanon Pokajanen - the first piece I heard from him and for me still the goto work.

  • Tabula Rasa album with Gidon Kremer on violin I find great. Also the Arbos album.

  • it didnae dae him any harm tae spar with tha Rabbie

  • edited February 15

    Always liked this one!
    https://www.arvopart.ee/en/arvo-part/work/387/
    scroll down to hear it!
    ......and the site is well worth a visit.

  • Well the first thing I had to learn was that your topic title does not rhyme.

  • @All Thanks so much, much meat to noodle about with amongst that little lot. It is a pity, even shameful, to be so slow to some parties, but it does mean there is much undiscovered pleasure still left in the world etc.

    @gusgranite I suspected as much. Let us just go forward, pretending otherwise etc as required.

  • Try and get to see a documentary about him - sorry can’t remember the name - a humble, gentle man with something quite spiritual about him. And his wife is always there in the background supporting him.

  • Arvo Part is amazing! Some of my favorites have already been mentioned: Tabula Rasa, Fratres.

    Agree with others! Great topic. ❤️

  • try also Für Alina

  • @gusgranite said:
    Well the first thing I had to learn was that your topic title does not rhyme.

    don’t stert me up on pronunciation!

  • Something new to me - so late also. Thanks @JohnnyGoodyear for asking!
    This might also interest @kinkujin :smile:

  • @RockySmalls said:

    @gusgranite said:
    Well the first thing I had to learn was that your topic title does not rhyme.

    don’t stert me up on pronunciation!

    OK, but I I loved the ertwork on the album.

  • I once took a recording of Spiegel im Speigel and did a kind of Steve Reich phased tape loop thing with it in Ableton Live, all starting at the beginning, but playing it at 3 very slightly different speeds - after a minute or so it sounded quite hypnotic.

  • edited February 15

    @RockySmalls said:
    it didnae dae him any harm tae spar with tha Rabbie

    thank you. This is a version of Pari Intervallo, one of my favourite pieces. Also played by Christopher Bowers-Broadbent. This version has the lead voice transcribed to voice, and the lower voices varied a bit for accompaniment. It is well done, although I find the original Pari Intervallo more pure with only pipe organ.

    Yes there are a couple of documentaries. They are beautiful as the music. Because, as a musician or aspiring musician, one can learn much. Just by observing the composer sitting in a church while his works are performed. How he listens carefully. If we are serious about music, we should have the same determination and love.

    Another favourite of mine is Beatus Petronius:

    and because it's such a beautiful song, a different recording (probably older). I find it a bit better done:

    Another good thing is to see a small orchestra performing. The following video is not the best recording, but gives for those not familiar with classical music the impression of how such powerful music is done, even by a young orchestra. Silouans Song:

    Here is the 'original' recording by the Estonian National Symphony Orchestra, directed by Paavo Järvi:

    Chanting in choirs is an old tradition in Estonia. I've never been in Estonia myself, but I heard and read about this tradition. It is therefore not so surprising to hear such music from that part of the world. And there's also the Russian Orthodox music, mostly chants. Polyphonic chants. Probably the first form of music. Rarely known in the western world. The Beatles and The Beach Boys sang in harmonies, these were not polyphonic chants where each voice has its own melody that melts together with the other melodies.

    Here is a very slow version of Pari Intervallo:

    And a very fast version, adapted for recorders:

    De Profundis, an example of polyphonic chant:

    And after De Profundis, it is good to listen to Es sang vor langen Jahren (monophonic chant this time):

    This is from one of my channels that I captured from television. Silentium:

  • edited February 16

    here is a piano version of Pari Intervallo. Very well performed. I like it when two people sit at the same instrument, most of the time it is the piano.

    I think this piece works well with the piano. Although to me it is somehow minimalist. Even more than the actual composition that is minimalist itself. The pipe sound of the original composition provide a better sound, comply better with the notes played. Pipes, reeds, they sound very good when sustained. Piano has no long sustain, fades out, and, in this composition, cannot hold the intervals long enough. But its a very nice interpretation and variant.

    Spontaneously there came an image to my mind. As an element for a future film project. A married couple sits on the home piano (that may be slightly detuned) and plays Pari Intervallo. The children sit on the floor and while listening, perform some extraordinary movements with their toys, or without toys, with their hands. Or even dance to the music, move to the music. This will be a very powerful scene in a film.

    Electronic oscillators, even sawtooth oscillators with more spectrum, sound boring when sustained. Reeds always have that special sound because their sound moves permanently.

  • edited February 17

    @Phil999 said:
    here is a piano version of Pari Intervallo. Very well performed. I like it when two people sit at the same instrument, most of the time it is the piano.

    I think this piece works well with the piano. Although to me it is somehow minimalist. Even more than the actual composition that is minimalist itself. The pipe sound of the original composition provide a better sound, comply better with the notes played. Pipes, reeds, they sound very good when sustained. Piano has no long sustain, fades out, and, in this composition, cannot hold the intervals long enough. But its a very nice interpretation and variant.

    Spontaneously there came an image to my mind. As an element for a future film project. A married couple sits on the home piano (that may be slightly detuned) and plays Pari Intervallo. The children sit on the floor and while listening, perform some extraordinary movements with their toys, or without toys, with their hands. Or even dance to the music, move to the music. This will be a very powerful scene in a film.

    Electronic oscillators, even sawtooth oscillators with more spectrum, sound boring when sustained. Reeds always have that special sound because their sound moves permanently.

    Thank you so much. For the the clip, certainly, but far more so for your thoughts and the film project idea, which I can immediately see in my mind :smile:

    EDIT: For what it's worth, I understand your thoughts on the piano versus reeds etc, but compared to the studio version I have, I actually prefer the piano performance you shared BECAUSE of its increased minimalism, as well as the odd/intimate dynamic between the the man and woman playing as well. Thanks again.

  • @MrBlaschke said:
    Something new to me - so late also. Thanks @JohnnyGoodyear for asking!
    This might also interest @kinkujin :smile:

    Indeed you are correct my friend!

  • I have kept coming back to Kanon Pokajanen. Thanks for all the nice clips, @Phil999! Now I want to build a spotify playlist with the best parts.

    There are quite a few papers out there, even code, describing some of the mathematical relationships in Pärt's music. Something about distances to triad chords in this Tintinnubalism system, if I remember correctly. Could perhaps serve as inspiration for a Mozaic script?

  • This just came up on my YouTube home page from a recent live concert feed. The first two tracks are just sublime especially the second Cantus in Memoriam Benjamin Britten - live string section with the composer in attendance. Brilliant!

  • edited February 19

    @ajmiller I have a serious thing to take notes on/figure out later, at least an hour, maybe two, thank you for providing me with a soundtrack :)

  • De Profundis was my gateway. Tabula Rasa and Spiegel im Spiegel are also favorites.

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