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GRIND and DLYM in AUM for your guitar

Hi guys, here's the latest experiment from my "What can I do with AUM?" adventures.
Some heavy wavetable distortion (got some lighter ones too but they sound boring in comparison :D )

Comments

  • Catchy riff. Nice!

  • @SpookyZoo said:
    Catchy riff. Nice!

    How do you find the sound? I want more opinions :)

  • @rs2000

    The sound is distorted but it sounds jagged.
    I wouldn't mind hearing the lighter ones.
    Try running the sample you've got through distortion and
    then a multiband compressor and see what happens.

  • edited November 5

    Here's another one, this time using filter overdrive. Sounds quite different indeed.

  • @rs2000 said:
    Here's another one, this time using filter overdrive. Sounds quite different indeed.

    Very nice.

  • edited November 5

    @Blue_Mangoo said:

    @rs2000 said:
    Here's another one, this time using filter overdrive. Sounds quite different indeed.

    Very nice.

    Thank you!
    Now that I've started to learn about distortion, I'm stunned by how many different ways lead to different sounds. The most interesting one so far seems to be my simple Audulus prototype in which positive and negative wave shape (or should I say wave bending?) can be adjusted independently while listening to the result live.
    This could be extended to a much more complex model of course.
    The two shapers are "Mapper" nodes and the bottom window is just an oscilloscope to help adjusting the input gain, which is quite relevant for the shaped result.

  • edited November 6

    @rs2000 said:
    Here's another one, this time using filter overdrive. Sounds quite different indeed.

    If you have a parametric EQ handy i would recommend trying this:

    Pre-distortion EQ
    1. Gain at -15
    2. Bell shaped boost +25 dB at 720 hz with Q at 1 (adjust the 25 dB to get more or less distortion gain)

    Post distortion EQ
    1. Gain at -15
    2. Bell shaped Boost +25 dB at 85 Hz with Q at about 0.35
    3. Bell shaped boost +10 dB Q=1.4 at 2200 Hz (adjust the gain and Q of this one to brighten or darken the tone)

  • @Blue_Mangoo said:
    Pre-distortion EQ
    1. Gain at -15
    2. Bell shaped boost +25 dB at 720 hz with Q at 1 (adjust the 25 dB to get more or less distortion gain)

    Post distortion EQ
    1. Gain at -15
    2. Bell shaped Boost +25 dB at 85 Hz with Q at about 0.35
    3. Bell shaped boost +10 dB Q=1.4 at 2200 Hz (adjust the gain and Q of this one to brighten or darken the tone)

    I like these "notes" for a set-up.

    It also made me wonder if these settings are exposed as Parameter controls in AUM and (good news) they are all there. So, it would be fun to map some external knobs or LFO's
    to them.

    For anyone (like me) that's figuring out some Parametric EQ terms and functionality, here's more details from Presonus:

    Understanding Q

    In equalizers, Q is the ratio of center frequency to bandwidth, and if the center frequency is fixed, then bandwidth is inversely proportional to Q—meaning that as you raise the Q, you narrow the bandwidth. Q is by far the most useful tool a parametric EQ offers, allowing you to attenuate or boost a very narrow or wide range of frequencies within each EQ band.

    A narrow bandwidth (high Q) is particularly useful for removing unpleasant tones. Let’s say the snare drum in your mix has an annoying ring. With a very narrow bandwidth, you can isolate the offending frequency (usually around 1 kHz) and remove, or reject, it. This type of narrow band-reject filter is also known as a notch filter. By notching out the offending frequency, you can remove the problem without removing the instrument from the mix.

    A narrow bandwidth is also useful in boosting desirable components of an instrument’s sound, such as the attack on a drum. For instance, a kick drum resonates somewhere between 60 to 125 Hz, but the attack of the kick drum is much higher, at 2 to 5 kHz. By setting a narrow bandwidth and boosting the attack a bit, you can achieve a punchier kick drum without overpowering the rest of the mix.

    A broad bandwidth accentuates or attenuates a larger band of frequencies. Broad and narrow bandwidths (low and high Q, respectively) are usually used in conjunction with one another to achieve the desired effect. Let’s look at our kick drum again. We have a kick drum that has a great, big, low-end sound centered around 100 Hz and an attack hitting almost dead-on at 4 kHz. In this example, you would use a broad bandwidth in the low-frequency band, centered at 100 Hz, and a narrow bandwidth boosted at 4 kHz. In this way, you are accentuating the best and downplaying everything else this particular kick drum has to offer.

    Shelving EQ

    A shelving EQ attenuates or boosts frequencies above or below a specified cutoff point. Shelving equalizers come in two different varieties: high-pass and low-pass. Low-pass shelving filters pass all frequencies below a specified cutoff frequency, while attenuating all the frequencies above the cutoff. A high-pass filter does the opposite, passing all frequencies above the specified cutoff frequency while attenuating everything below. Usually, the frequencies beyond the cutoff are rolled off, following a predetermined curve, not cut off sharply, as with a “brickwall” filter.

  • edited November 6

    @McD said:

    @Blue_Mangoo said:
    Pre-distortion EQ
    1. Gain at -15
    2. Bell shaped boost +25 dB at 720 hz with Q at 1 (adjust the 25 dB to get more or less distortion gain)

    Post distortion EQ
    1. Gain at -15
    2. Bell shaped Boost +25 dB at 85 Hz with Q at about 0.35
    3. Bell shaped boost +10 dB Q=1.4 at 2200 Hz (adjust the gain and Q of this one to brighten or darken the tone)

    I like these "notes" for a set-up.

    It also made me wonder if these settings are exposed as Parameter controls in AUM and (good news) they are all there. So, it would be fun to map some external knobs or LFO's
    to them.

    For anyone (like me) that's figuring out some Parametric EQ terms and functionality, here's more details from Presonus:

    Understanding Q

    In equalizers, Q is the ratio of center frequency to bandwidth, and if the center frequency is fixed, then bandwidth is inversely proportional to Q—meaning that as you raise the Q, you narrow the bandwidth. Q is by far the most useful tool a parametric EQ offers, allowing you to attenuate or boost a very narrow or wide range of frequencies within each EQ band.

    A narrow bandwidth (high Q) is particularly useful for removing unpleasant tones. Let’s say the snare drum in your mix has an annoying ring. With a very narrow bandwidth, you can isolate the offending frequency (usually around 1 kHz) and remove, or reject, it. This type of narrow band-reject filter is also known as a notch filter. By notching out the offending frequency, you can remove the problem without removing the instrument from the mix.

    A narrow bandwidth is also useful in boosting desirable components of an instrument’s sound, such as the attack on a drum. For instance, a kick drum resonates somewhere between 60 to 125 Hz, but the attack of the kick drum is much higher, at 2 to 5 kHz. By setting a narrow bandwidth and boosting the attack a bit, you can achieve a punchier kick drum without overpowering the rest of the mix.

    A broad bandwidth accentuates or attenuates a larger band of frequencies. Broad and narrow bandwidths (low and high Q, respectively) are usually used in conjunction with one another to achieve the desired effect. Let’s look at our kick drum again. We have a kick drum that has a great, big, low-end sound centered around 100 Hz and an attack hitting almost dead-on at 4 kHz. In this example, you would use a broad bandwidth in the low-frequency band, centered at 100 Hz, and a narrow bandwidth boosted at 4 kHz. In this way, you are accentuating the best and downplaying everything else this particular kick drum has to offer.

    Shelving EQ

    A shelving EQ attenuates or boosts frequencies above or below a specified cutoff point. Shelving equalizers come in two different varieties: high-pass and low-pass. Low-pass shelving filters pass all frequencies below a specified cutoff frequency, while attenuating all the frequencies above the cutoff. A high-pass filter does the opposite, passing all frequencies above the specified cutoff frequency while attenuating everything below. Usually, the frequencies beyond the cutoff are rolled off, following a predetermined curve, not cut off sharply, as with a “brickwall” filter.

    Thanks. That is helpful information. The definition of Q in that article is correct. Unfortunately some EQ have their own definition of Q which is totally different (I’m thinking specifically of Logic Pro here). So when someone gives you settings like I did above, take the Q numbers with a grain of salt and if they don’t sound right, just change them. Once you play around with the Q you’ll see and hear what it does.

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