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LUFS metering in Pro L 2 - short tutorial on how to get best results for streaming platforms

Just a quick overview of how to use the integrated mode in the new LUFS metering options in Pro L 2:

Comments

  • Thanks for making this video Richard. Very helpful I’ll have to watch again later and take a few notes

  • Thanks muchly for this Mister...

  • Well done, sir. Useful info. Adding a small demo on setting up those subgroups would also be helpful, especially for those new to Auria Pro.

    BTW, your voice sounded nothing like I’d imagined. ;)

  • Thank you, Mr. Yot - picked the right week to pop back on to the group. LUFS! Nice to get a better understanding of momentary vs. short-term vs. integrated. LUFS! :smile:

  • @Zen210507 said:
    Well done, sir. Useful info. Adding a small demo on setting up those subgroups would also be helpful, especially for those new to Auria Pro.

    BTW, your voice sounded nothing like I’d imagined. ;)

    Subgroups are a piece of cake to set up. Every project has 8 subgroups by default, they are at the far right of the channels, before the Master Strip.

    Just tap on a subgroup name to rename it:

    Then select a channel, tap on the output for that channel, and route it to the relevant subgroup, that's it!

    As I said in the video, if you assign every channel in your mix to a logical subgroup, it makes life a lot easier, because you can balance music against drums, or music against vocals, drums against vocals etc with a couple of faders. Personally I hate to mix without them :)

  • @richardyot said:
    Just a quick overview of how to use the integrated mode in the new LUFS metering options in Pro L 2:

    Great video, very helpful many thanks for this. I have one question: let’s say that in my track I have very quiet parts and very loud parts. I can imagine that the integrated figure will give me something like -16. In this can I will increase the gain by 2. In reality, doing this will distord the loudest parts of my song. Isn’t it more logic to use the short term mode and use automation on the gain so that I can keep more control on my output ? Or maybe I simply don’t understand how a limiter works...

  • edited April 2018

    yeah, thanks, richardyot, some very good explanation there

  • @cuscolima said:

    @richardyot said:
    Just a quick overview of how to use the integrated mode in the new LUFS metering options in Pro L 2:

    Great video, very helpful many thanks for this. I have one question: let’s say that in my track I have very quiet parts and very loud parts. I can imagine that the integrated figure will give me something like -16. In this can I will increase the gain by 2. In reality, doing this will distord the loudest parts of my song. Isn’t it more logic to use the short term mode and use automation on the gain so that I can keep more control on my output ? Or maybe I simply don’t understand how a limiter works...

    If you have very quiet parts and very loud parts it doesn't mean that the louder parts will distort, but it's possible they will be subject to more aggressive limiting, however -14 LUFS allows for some dynamic range in the track by design, so even the louder parts will never be compressed as hard as they would with CD style mastering. Also Pro L 2 is a very transparent limiter, distortion is very unlikely to occur unless you push it really hard, way harder than -14 LUFS.

    But coming back to the dynamics of your track, if you have quiet parts and loud parts, presumably that's by design, so you want to preserve those dynamics, not destroy them :) If you want the quiet parts louder, do that in the actual mix rather than the limiter would be my advice.

  • @richardyot said:
    Subgroups are a piece of cake to set up. Every project has 8 subgroups by default, they are at the far right of the channels, before the Master Strip.

    >

    Super speedy post, completing the technique. :)

  • @richardyot said:

    @cuscolima said:

    @richardyot said:
    Just a quick overview of how to use the integrated mode in the new LUFS metering options in Pro L 2:

    Great video, very helpful many thanks for this. I have one question: let’s say that in my track I have very quiet parts and very loud parts. I can imagine that the integrated figure will give me something like -16. In this can I will increase the gain by 2. In reality, doing this will distord the loudest parts of my song. Isn’t it more logic to use the short term mode and use automation on the gain so that I can keep more control on my output ? Or maybe I simply don’t understand how a limiter works...

    If you have very quiet parts and very loud parts it doesn't mean that the louder parts will distort, but it's possible they will be subject to more aggressive limiting, however -14 LUFS allows for some dynamic range in the track by design, so even the louder parts will never be compressed as hard as they would with CD style mastering. Also Pro L 2 is a very transparent limiter, distortion is very unlikely to occur unless you push it really hard, way harder than -14 LUFS.

    But coming back to the dynamics of your track, if you have quiet parts and loud parts, presumably that's by design, so you want to preserve those dynamics, not destroy them :) If you want the quiet parts louder, do that in the actual mix rather than the limiter would be my advice.

    It makes sense, thanks a lot

  • I posted this on the videos comments:
    ————
    Outstanding video Richard! You really make the concepts easy to understand. As an iOS music devotee such as yourself, I think Auria Pro coupled with FabFilter’s exceptional plugins (especially L-2) can produce recordings as good as desktop systems costing 10 times as much & 10 times as complex. Auria gets knocked a bit for being too deep sometimes but I think those folks never used a mid 2000’s ProTools setup on PC...thanks so much for making this.

    ————

    Let me add here though that coming from a pre streaming background where I saw the loudness wars first take hold in the late ‘90’s, and still see cats today who think “-14dbs?! Really? Nah we gotta push it a bit higher”. I’m guilty of it too, especially if a track is like the one Richard demonstrates in the video, not very hot, with lots of nice dynamics barely limited at all.

    That damn “get it as close zero” shit has thankfully mostly gone away & hopefully will never return. The streaming standards have made a return to sanity possible but they also make LUFS metering a huge part of the equation if you’re looking for excellent mixes. Complaints over how SoundCloud & other streaming services effect the sound of uploaded music are more than likely caused by leaving it up to some algorithm in the cloud to mash your -1dbs peaking master down to the new standards.

    Rich really shows how simple it is to get incredible results with software that frankly is a steal compared to what a comparable desktop studio capability would cost. Anywhere from $300 to a grand on top DAW software, FabFilter Pro-L2 on desktop is $200 next to $25-$50 on Auria or Auria Pro and $40 for the EXACT same plugin Pro-L2. Even if that’s all you used Auria for, under a C-note for a mastering set up THAT good? Damn...

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