OT: Observations

The more I make music the less I listen to it.

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  • The more music I listen to, the more I want to make my own.

    Happy Thanksgiving

  • I listen to music all day while I’m working, so can’t identify with that statement boss.

  • @telecharge I think it began with writing. I would read Henry Miller or Primo Levi or B. S. Johnson, almost anyone I really admired at the time however different, and would find I unconsciously began to write in their particular rhythm. Too impressionable maybe. It is the chameleon's nature, after all, to want to make things right.

  • @MonzoPro said:
    I listen to music all day while I’m working, so can’t identify with that statement boss.

    I used to. Especially when droning along with mundane tasks, but I sit here in silence now it seems.

  • edited November 2017

    I go up and down with this, but I think the main reason it cuts into my listening is that at home, I'm quite often thinking about picking up the guitar or the iPad, and I don't want to start an album, then shut it off.

    Writing and books, I don't think that ever did affect me, except for the usual, "this piece of dreck got published, and my stuff gets chucked?" Which was one of the main reasons I stopped writing. :/

  • I like listening to lots of different kinds of music, and making my own just gives me a deeper appreciation of other people's.

  • @richardyot said:
    I like listening to lots of different kinds of music, and making my own just gives me a deeper appreciation of other people's.

    @MonzoPro said:
    I listen to music all day while I’m working, so can’t identify with that statement boss.

    Both of these for me. I find other people's music inspires my style so I am always hungry for more. I work an office so it is easy to plug in some headphones.

  • edited November 2017

    @JohnnyGoodyear said:
    The more I make music the less I listen to it.

    Are you meaning music in general or your own output? Interesting idea though.
    Are we capable of listening to music critically and with enjoyment simultaneously?

  • @JohnnyGoodyear said:
    @telecharge I think it began with writing. I would read Henry Miller or Primo Levi or B. S. Johnson, almost anyone I really admired at the time however different, and would find I unconsciously began to write in their particular rhythm. Too impressionable maybe. It is the chameleon's nature, after all, to want to make things right.

    This young lady calls upon composers of the past when writing music. Maybe you're a prodigy, JG.
    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/watch-a-prodigy-create-from-four-notes-in-a-hat

    More hippie nonsense.
    https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/how_music_helps_us_be_more_creative

  • I used to listing to music most of the time. In spaces between I’d make music. I’d sometimes eat and sleep.

    Now with kids providing so much background noise and mrs supadom saying that music confuses her I tend to listen only in the car and BBC4 podcasts which are perfect for phasing out.

    Otherwise, any free time is spent on making music, which I’d do absolutely all the time given the chance. Not a family man attitude but when the kids get involved it can be good.

  • This forum needs more xylophone solos. Just an observation...

  • I listen mostly in the car, but I’ve been finding I prefer silence a lot more. I think it has something to do with fatigue related to elevated levels of noise pollution these days but, maybe I’m just getting old.

  • edited November 2017

    I have found that during the past several years, I will seek out instrumental music rather than vocal music. I talk all day, and also have to listen to others talk all day. I suspect that I get my share of points of view, and consequently enjoy the pleasures of tone devoid of overt meaning or intention.

  • edited November 2017

    @JohnnyGoodyear
    I make time to listen to music, even if it’s tried and true. I was up at 5 am today and listened to Pink Floyd’s THE WALL in its entirety. It was glorious and inspired me to play around with delay and Reverb a bit more when I mix my next batch of songs. The music of my arrested development never ceases to take me back to my primal passion for rock and roll and the search for my identity in and around it. I make music because I LOVE listening to it. I can’t make music without making time to listen to it.

    After writing the above, I reread your post, and I’m not sure there’s a longing for listening there. What compelled you to start the thread with that particular observation?

  • I’ve had a similar observation. In my case I found that I was enjoying listening less because I was always listening analytically rather than listening for pure enjoyment

  • @ecamburn said:
    I’ve had a similar observation. In my case I found that I was enjoying listening less because I was always listening analytically rather than listening for pure enjoyment

    I think of listening like learning. There is rote learning and active learning. There is passive listening and active listening.

    Also, with both you can become so absorbed that you lose track of space and time.

  • @supanorton said:
    @JohnnyGoodyear
    I make time to listen to music, even if it’s tried and true. I was up at 5 am today and listened to Pink Floyd’s THE WALL in its entirety. It was glorious and inspired me to play around with delay and Reverb a bit more when I mix my next batch of songs. The music of my arrested development never ceases to take me back to my primal passion for rock and roll and the search for my identity in and around it. I make music because I LOVE listening to it. I can’t make music without making time to listen to it.

    After writing the above, I reread your post, and I’m not sure there’s a longing for listening there. What compelled you to start the thread with that particular observation?

    Inspiring, would never think to listen to The Wall front to back. Once did and often. Maybe lost my way. As regard my initial thought it just dawned on me while making tea and had no one within range who would either know what I was talking about or care particularly and so I thought I would start a thread for such things here in the bunker of similar souls, not with any specific intention, more just to say it out loud and thus cause myself to think about it some more rather than it simply falling through the cracks of my mind by the time I reached my study...

  • @JohnnyGoodyear said:
    The more I make music the less I listen to it.

    Same! Although I can’t call it making music yet... nothing finished.

    Known as an obsessive, avid listener. When asked if I play an instrument, I say ‘no, but I have very big ears’.

    But not listening to much lately. Not watching any Netflix either. Just iOS music. Very much enjoying myself too. I sense it might travel in waves, however.

    Good observation, JG.

  • edited November 2017

    @JohnnyGoodyear said:
    @telecharge I think it began with writing. I would read Henry Miller or Primo Levi or B. S. Johnson, almost anyone I really admired at the time however different, and would find I unconsciously began to write in their particular rhythm. Too impressionable maybe. It is the chameleon's nature, after all, to want to make things right.

    i know this one, i’ve been the chameleon in writing, movies, and music...

    And now i find myself listening to music every day, and not the kind i make, and not always of my choosing (driving the teenage daughter to and from involves listening to stuff good and bad in a genre that i don’t work in). It’s music the chameleon will never fully take on, but i feel the stretch and chunks of that stuff are now showing up in my stuff

  • I'm on the train a lot, so that's my listening time. At home I'm on the guitar, ipad etc...

  • @Littlewoodg said:

    ....but i feel the stretch and chunks of that stuff are now showing up in my stuff

    The unspoken science fiction of parenting. Beings born from their host, but (aurally it appears) not actually of them. The Boy here showers (as boys must do) and blares the bluetooth speaker, revenging himself upon me. I remember at the height of the Great Punk Revolution we would giggle on speed and hash about how our kids were so screwed. What could they play us on their jetcar dansettes that could remotely freak with us?

    This very afternoon he was up there, his playlist back to back and repeated was Rocket Man, Everybody Wants to Rule The World, September (E, W & F) and then, in a glorious fuck off, Africa (Toto, no less). The horror.

    And I would say 'no son of mine' and 'not of this world', both true, but I love him still. Very clever the work these aliens do.

  • @richardyot said:
    I like listening to lots of different kinds of music, and making my own just gives me a deeper appreciation of other people's.

    >

    This.

  • As part of my Bill Drummond/KLF season, I’ve just finished reading his book ‘17’, in which he entertains the end of recorded music, and the start of his international No Music Day. Worth a read @JohnnyGoodyear

  • edited November 2017

    I walk about 20 to 30 minutes almost every morning and listen to music as I go (recently the Doug Woods benefit album had dominated the playlist, which is like 4 hours of music). I went out without headphones a couple of days ago and although it wasn’t a horrible experience, it felt odd and I really missed it. That’s my time to enjoy other people’s music, and mostly I listen to Prog Rock and instrumental stuff because it’s stuff I own, it’s on my iPhone and dammit I’m old and set in my ways!

    Any new music I hear is either via this forum or on YouTube. Beyond that, I listen to my own stuff when I’m creating it and sometimes I go back and listen to my finished stuff and actually enjoy it (well, some of it).

  • It’s the reverse for me.

    If I’m finding and listening to good, interesting music it really drives me to sit down and try to make my own. And it gives me new ideas.

    Right now I’ve not got anything particularly new (or old) I want to listen to. And I feel less inspired to make any.

  • @JohnnyGoodyear said:

    @Littlewoodg said:

    ....but i feel the stretch and chunks of that stuff are now showing up in my stuff

    The unspoken science fiction of parenting. Beings born from their host, but (aurally it appears) not actually of them. The Boy here showers (as boys must do) and blares the bluetooth speaker, revenging himself upon me. I remember at the height of the Great Punk Revolution we would giggle on speed and hash about how our kids were so screwed. What could they play us on their jetcar dansettes that could remotely freak with us?

    This very afternoon he was up there, his playlist back to back and repeated was Rocket Man, Everybody Wants to Rule The World, September (E, W & F) and then, in a glorious fuck off, Africa (Toto, no less). The horror.

    And I would say 'no son of mine' and 'not of this world', both true, but I love him still. Very clever the work these aliens do.

    Well said
    And So strange - Toto’s Africa blasting out of daughters Bluetooth, in the shower, the very day of your reply...

  • I think it's about you just want a musical experience. For most, that means listening. For myself and others, that means making music. So I hear ya. I mostly listen to the stuff I make as I'm making it and that fulfills my music needs

  • @brambos said:

    Thanks for those :)

  • I go through cycles. I will eat up any and all new releases/old favorites for 3 months or so, then I’ll have a month when I’m doing my own thing and when I’m not writing the only things I’ll listen to are my past recordings, analytically.

    Overall, in the last three years I find myself gravitating towards instrumental music and, more and more, just some type of white noise (especially thunderstorms) to keep me focused and calm my mind.

    As others stated, fatigue can set in as you get older. A big example for me is the latest War on Drugs album. Easily my favorite of this year, but I feel emotionally and especially physically drained after listening to the full album (and to be honest, usually 1/2 or 2/3 of the way through). It’s an all-time masterpiece in obsessive production that I’ll suggest to anyone, but sadly, the result of listening inspires a nap more than it does the creativity. That wouldn’t have been the case for me 5 or even 2 years ago.

    Getting older is a strange adjustment (at any age, but I’m 32 for reference); the adapting one does to cope becomes more of a natural shift in behavior rather than a conscious effort to change.

    /tangent

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