Audiobus: Use your music apps together.

What is Audiobus?Audiobus is an award-winning music app for iPhone and iPad which lets you use your other music apps together. Chain effects on your favourite synth, run the output of apps or Audio Units into an app like GarageBand or Loopy, or select a different audio interface output for each app. Route MIDI between apps — drive a synth from a MIDI sequencer, or add an arpeggiator to your MIDI keyboard — or sync with your external MIDI gear. And control your entire setup from a MIDI controller.

Download on the App Store

Audiobus is the app that makes the rest of your setup better.

Android apps are good enough for "playing" some music on the go

I use iPad for music making but my iPad stays home most of the time(12.9"). My budget Android tablet is the device with me on the go. I won't waste money and time trying to use Android to make music as iPad. But for enjoying and playing some music on the go, Android is fully capable and there are some apps to do so.

To play some beats
G-Stomper Rhythm(free), a good enough drum machine app
Koala Sampler($4.99 base app with extra IAP), a good enough sampler

To play some keybaord/fretboard
Expressive Piano Synthesizer(free), a Roli like MPE keyboard app
MuseLead Synthesizer($4.99), a GeoShred like fretboard app

I spent $60 taking over my friend's Android tablet and it became a great coach/commute device with just the above apps.

«1

Comments

  • Is there an android version of our little ABF /iOS production forum-community?

  • Hello fellow Android user. :)

    Currently using FL Studio Mobile on this cheap Samsung Galaxy Tab S6 Lite. Will be getting into the other more Android-only apps soon, but first want to finish a 10-track album on here. :mrgreen:

  • The most powerful and complete ones:

    • FLSM
    • Koala
    • DRC
    • FRMS (tablet only)
    • Hexen (but I've found it a pain to use)
    • Audio Evolution Mobile (has TB plugins as IAPs, has a custom USB audio driver, the interface is not very convenient though)
    • Grainstorm
    • Mutant
    • Soniface Pro
    • Pegboard
    • G-Stomper apps
    • SunVox
    • Cubasis 3 (I like it on the iPad, but with no 3rd party plugins it definitely loses to FLSM and AEM on Android)

    Fun things for specific uses:

    • Digitron (in active development, may end up moving to the first list)
    • AMB-R
    • Kaossilator
    • Keylimba
    • Polaris (in active development, may end up moving to the first list)

    Overall, though, Android isn't suitable for making music. The most I trust my phone with other than nooding is working as an OP-Z display then recording it into AEM and applying some compression with TB Barricade.

  • @alexwasashrimp Holy shit! I forgot about Sunvox. :mrgreen: I used to have loads of fun making some experimental stuff on there back in 2015! Back when I still had an iPod Touch.

    You definitely have a definitive list of great Android apps above. Thank you for fueling my Android GAS, lol.

    That said, I'd make the argument that Android is indeed suitable for making music. It definitely lacks what iOS has and is limited in accessing files ever since AndroidOS 11 (I say as I type this out on Android), but...

    https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fi/bkvugdpjqmc55yha19ejb/050524a-1.mp3?rlkey=kadz18rhn6s41rrcns94vmgxw&dl=0

    Here's a Deadmau5-styled track I made last Sunday. Its title is "For My Friend, Gabe". I've made four other tracks for the upcoming album "Do Androids Dream of Music?" with the titular track being as follows...

    https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fi/7r4xegdjrcr16bbq6o2wr/051024a-1.mp3?rlkey=gb1ikykeolsq2mg67q8ts7xhd&dl=0

    And this all was done on my above-photographed Galaxy Tab S6 Lite, no outside help from iOS. 😉 Just pure Android.

    And controversial hot take - I like the S Pen a bit more than the Apple Pencil. For one thing I don't have to charge the f-cking thing. For another it has a side button which comes in handy when working on art and summoning the eyedropper tool. It also has a hover cursor. Took Apple how long to come up with the hover cursor feature and "squeeze pen" technology in an Apple Pencil Pro that only works on the expensive iPad Pros?

    I figured with this Android experiment if I return to iOS for music production, I still got a baller Android tablet to make art in. Medibang is excellent for art! Costs $2.49/month which is less than half the cost of a drink at Starbucks, although I heard a rumour that a "Medibang Pro" is coming to Android soon, which will cost a flat fee.

    Android has gotten me out of a nasty creative block, and I'm thankful for that lol.


    @yellow_eyez Surface Pro is Windows, not Android, but that's a baller price for a tablet that can run full Windows software like FL Studio proper and Ableton Live. And, perhaps a subforum for Android musicians can be made here if @Michael and @thesoundtestroom are okay with that.

  • OH! One other thing @alexwasashrimp . My Android has a proper headphone jack.

  • edited May 13

    @alexwasashrimp thanks for the great list but I intentionally skipping all daws, full features grooveboxes and apps need a larger screen than a typical 6-7" phone. We can do it sure but using an iPad make more sense.

    I have been a long term tri-OS user

    Portable/mobile for communication: Android
    Tablet for music: iPadOS
    laptop/desktop for researching: ChromeOS(Linux is there)

    @jwmmakerofmusic I also don't use the Apple pencil. it is indeed a superior "finger" but one is not enough, I need 10.

    Android can do music for sure but I don't do the same thing on different platfroms. I choose the most suitable one for different tasks. A budget Android is not my prefered platform for music making at home.

    I made this thread as Android users is the majority in terms of absolute users. I just share some Android apps that serve well as instruments on the go. We need more musical practice trying new rhythm, harmony and sounds.

    edit: wording

  • I had great fun with the G-Stomper apps a few years ago before I bought an iPad. They're lovely, fully featured grooveboxes that integrate well with hardware and built by a responsive dev

  • @drewinnit said:
    I had great fun with the G-Stomper apps a few years ago before I bought an iPad. They're lovely, fully featured grooveboxes that integrate well with hardware and built by a responsive dev

    Me too. Highly recommended for people already using Android devices.

    https://www.planet-h.com/gstomper/docs/html/G-Stomper_UserManual_Introduction/part7.htm

    Just the extra features/layout on G-Stomper Studio/Producer require a bigger screen than a typical size Android phone. A tablet gives much better experience. May be just my eye.

  • @jklovemusic agreed, I was using a Samsung tablet with the G-Stomper suite...i'm far too old and blind to manage anything on a smartphone :D

  • @jwmmakerofmusic said:
    That said, I'd make the argument that Android is indeed suitable for making music. It definitely lacks what iOS has and is limited in accessing files ever since AndroidOS 11 (I say as I type this out on Android), but...

    It's possible to make music on Android for sure, but there are three interconnected issues that aren't going to change anytime soon:

    • few apps
    • no plugins, no audio routing
    • the underlying audio system itself is poorly designed

    It all boils down to the fact that Google doesn't care about music production at all. They aren't interested in creating conditions for developers and musicians. The audio system on Android is good enough for gaming, listening to music and watching videos, that's all that counts.

    That's why my 2023 flagship phone has buffer dropouts in synth apps sometimes (that's on the developers as well, but can you imagine that happening with basic synths on iOS?). That's why I had to buy a custom USB driver just to record from my OP-Z without clicks and pops.

    I'd still choose Android for everyday use, because it's better in most other things, but when it comes to music production, basically the only thing my Android phone has over my iPad is that it's always here with me.

  • @jklovemusic Yep, for me a budget Android isn't my main music production environment, but it is for me a self-imposed challenge to produce music in it. ☺️ To see what I can do within the confines of the Android platform. It may not end up being my platform of choice for serious music production, but it will definitely end up being my go-to for creating digital art, watching videos, etc.

    @alexwasashrimp Yeah I definitely wouldn't use Android to record from my OP-1 Field, lol. 😂 But I do love the way things look on there. I still need to purchase the G-Stompers and a couple other Android-only apps for the next Android-only album. Current one is being produced on that which I already have purchased in the past (i.e. FLSM, its IAPs, and a couple of old discontinued Image-Line soundpacks).

  • Koala, spacecraft, caustic, nanoloop and sunvox are the five I mostly use.
    It's not as good as the iPad, but most my stuff gets finished in Ableton on my laptop anyway, so as long as you can export something it's ok.

  • @jwmmakerofmusic said:
    @alexwasashrimp Yeah I definitely wouldn't use Android to record from my OP-1 Field, lol. 😂

    You totally can though. AEM has an IAP with a custom USB driver, plus its developer is selling a USB recorder app.

    With it, everything is smooth. My preferred use case is exactly that: recording from my OP-Z.

  • @alexwasashrimp said:

    @jwmmakerofmusic said:
    @alexwasashrimp Yeah I definitely wouldn't use Android to record from my OP-1 Field, lol. 😂

    You totally can though. AEM has an IAP with a custom USB driver, plus its developer is selling a USB recorder app.

    With it, everything is smooth. My preferred use case is exactly that: recording from my OP-Z.

    Oh cool! :) I didn't know that.

  • @jwmmakerofmusic said:
    @alexwasashrimp Holy shit! I forgot about Sunvox. :mrgreen: I used to have loads of fun making some experimental stuff on there back in 2015! Back when I still had an iPod Touch.

    You definitely have a definitive list of great Android apps above. Thank you for fueling my Android GAS, lol.

    That said, I'd make the argument that Android is indeed suitable for making music. It definitely lacks what iOS has and is limited in accessing files ever since AndroidOS 11 (I say as I type this out on Android), but...

    https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fi/bkvugdpjqmc55yha19ejb/050524a-1.mp3?rlkey=kadz18rhn6s41rrcns94vmgxw&dl=0

    Here's a Deadmau5-styled track I made last Sunday. Its title is "For My Friend, Gabe". I've made four other tracks for the upcoming album "Do Androids Dream of Music?" with the titular track being as follows...

    https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fi/7r4xegdjrcr16bbq6o2wr/051024a-1.mp3?rlkey=gb1ikykeolsq2mg67q8ts7xhd&dl=0

    And this all was done on my above-photographed Galaxy Tab S6 Lite, no outside help from iOS. 😉 Just pure Android.

    And controversial hot take - I like the S Pen a bit more than the Apple Pencil. For one thing I don't have to charge the f-cking thing. For another it has a side button which comes in handy when working on art and summoning the eyedropper tool. It also has a hover cursor. Took Apple how long to come up with the hover cursor feature and "squeeze pen" technology in an Apple Pencil Pro that only works on the expensive iPad Pros?

    I figured with this Android experiment if I return to iOS for music production, I still got a baller Android tablet to make art in. Medibang is excellent for art! Costs $2.49/month which is less than half the cost of a drink at Starbucks, although I heard a rumour that a "Medibang Pro" is coming to Android soon, which will cost a flat fee.

    Android has gotten me out of a nasty creative block, and I'm thankful for that lol.


    @yellow_eyez Surface Pro is Windows, not Android, but that's a baller price for a tablet that can run full Windows software like FL Studio proper and Ableton Live. And, perhaps a subforum for Android musicians can be made here if @Michael and @thesoundtestroom are okay with that.

    I did confuse the two; but I’m Absolutely kidding about jumping ship anyway: couldn’t leave iPadOS and even iOS if I tried ; but I respect your flexibility to work on any platform .

  • I would recommend getting a Surface over an Android tablet anyway, since you can run Android apps on the Surface through an emulator and also run all the Windows apps too of course. :)

  • Yeah hope Android devices get just a little bit more love from musicians.

  • @Carnbot said:
    I would recommend getting a Surface over an Android tablet anyway, since you can run Android apps on the Surface through an emulator and also run all the Windows apps too of course. :)

    That's pretty awesome as I didn't know one could use an emulator. 😎


    @jklovemusic said:
    Yeah hope Android devices get just a little bit more love from musicians.

    Me too. I love FLSM, but as soon as I make more money I'll be buying the G-Stompers to play around with. :)

  • Zenbeats.

  • @alexwasashrimp said:

    @jwmmakerofmusic said:
    @alexwasashrimp Yeah I definitely wouldn't use Android to record from my OP-1 Field, lol. 😂

    You totally can though. AEM has an IAP with a custom USB driver, plus its developer is selling a USB recorder app.

    With it, everything is smooth. My preferred use case is exactly that: recording from my OP-Z.

    Similar case here.
    I generally use my android phone on the go and at home with my Zoom U44 or Behringer UAC-222.
    I can record my hardware grooveboxes there using AEM as a tracker mostly.

    Sometimes I feed stems from FLSM, G-Stomper, Caustic, Koala, Yellofier, Flip, Kaossilator, Minimic, Nanoloop, Sunvox, Pixitracker, Fractal Bits, Famistudio, Hexen, DRC, etc.

    Sync projects and continue working on the iPad. And so-on and back and forth :wink:

    If I had AEM on desktop would be even better :lol:

  • @senhorlampada which tracker app u recommend for a complete beginner?

    I prefer a faster workflow and more active development one, thx

  • @jklovemusic
    Sorry for maybe a strange use of words from my part :lol:
    I meant tracker in the sense of "recording tracks"

    Regarding trackers in the other sense...
    I would recommend Sunvox or Deflemask as being active in development and multi-platform.
    Sunvox is free on multiple platforms and Deflemask has an older free version for desktop.
    Both would cost you not too much on iOS or Android.

    https://www.deflemask.com
    https://warmplace.ru/soft/sunvox/

    You want a tracker for android, ios or both?

    Gonna page @Samu (sorry mate lol) because for me he is the wizard regarding this subject

  • edited May 15

    @senhorlampada

    Sunvox seems cool I would try it on Linux

  • The BIGGEST drawback on Android platform is PIRACY…

    Piracy holding back a lot of developer from getting investment on the Google konglomerat…

    Also, Android platform still have problem with security, spyware, phishing, virus etc etc.

  • No, that's not the problem, that's a popular misconception. Android, which is based on Linux can be very secure.

    The main problem is fragmentation. There are so many different versions of Android as it's open source which means keeping an audio based platform which uses plugins compatible across all the different versions of Android very difficult and costly for developers to keep things up to date.

  • @jklovemusic said:
    @senhorlampada

    Sunvox seems cool I would try it on Linux

    There is a cool advantage with sunvox... In which you could sketch some stuff on Pixitracker (or PIxitracker 1Bit) and export to sunvox. Or maybe use Fractal Bits, Relic Waves or Flow to choose your sound palette and export to sunvox too and play with them there.
    It's a whole Zolotov playground :lol:

  • The BIGGEST drawback on Android platform is PIRACY> @Carnbot said:

    No, that's not the problem, that's a popular misconception. Android, which is based on Linux can be very secure.

    The main problem is fragmentation. There are so many different versions of Android as it's open source which means keeping an audio based platform which uses plugins compatible across all the different versions of Android very difficult and costly for developers to keep things up to date.

    Piracy IS a big problem on Android, that's fact…

    IF you/we want to install an Commercial app for free, it’s pretty easy to do, especially compared to iOS (Jailbreak)…

    On the other hand, Windows was in early days full of piracy software, but it went out pretty well for many software houses…

  • What's stopping audio companies or communities from developing their own "Android Distro" for music producers?

  • edited May 15

    @HolyMoses said:
    The BIGGEST drawback on Android platform is PIRACY> @Carnbot said:

    No, that's not the problem, that's a popular misconception. Android, which is based on Linux can be very secure.

    The main problem is fragmentation. There are so many different versions of Android as it's open source which means keeping an audio based platform which uses plugins compatible across all the different versions of Android very difficult and costly for developers to keep things up to date.

    Piracy IS a big problem on Android, that's fact…

    IF you/we want to install an Commercial app for free, it’s pretty easy to do, especially compared to iOS (Jailbreak)…

    On the other hand, Windows was in early days full of piracy software, but it went out pretty well for many software houses…

    There's plenty of piracy on jailbreak iOS too and lots of malware, phishing etc, I get it constantly on my iphone but luckily I know how to spot it.
    Lets keep this on topic and not degenerate this into some pointless Android vs iOS rubbish please.

Sign In or Register to comment.