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«Lorelei’s Lullaby» - dark edgy bluesy collab with Cthonicist (Svetlovska)

edited October 2023 in Creations

Last week, @Svetlovska posted her first experiment with the recently released NoInputMixer app, asking forum members to use her track as a starting point. She was looking for some dirty blues in the spirit of Tom Waits and Nick Cave and this really struck a chord so I decided to give it a shot. Quickly it turned out to be a full song. I tried to write a short story about what we call in France "Démon de Midi" (literally Midday Demon) which usually describes some men's erratic and destructive behaviour during middle life crisis. The dark fantasy twist of the story is that the main character left his whole life behind after falling for a beautiful young creature who happens to be a siren feeding on men like him 😁.

I managed to create a very edgy electric viola track in the spirit of John Cale or Warren Ellis with SWAM viola recorded live with MIDI keys (Studio logic SL73) and Expressiv-e Touché. Sounds convincing to my ears.

Hope some of you will enjoy.

Lyrics in the spoiler

Lorelei’s Lullaby

Riding all night into a sandstorm
Looking for a needle in a haystack
She left in the morning without a sign
But I remember the things we did all night.

Chorus:
Ride, ride, ride till the kiss of dawn
Ride ride ride till the tremor is gone
Ride, ride, ride till the kiss of dawn
I found myself a new home in her arms

I got a nickel in my pocket
Not enough to quench my thirst
Yeah got a nickel in my hand
And this old house to burn
Son, tell your Mama I'm long gone
And I am not coming back
Yeah tell your Mama I'm long gone
For I was lost but found the right track

Chorus

I Hear her voice so clear
Her lullaby in my head
I Hear her voice so clear
Guiding me through the desperate land

Chorus

Here you are, sweet baby
On your bed of thorns
Yeah I found you little baby
And now I hear you cracking my bones
Put me to sleep my pretty little baby
Put me to sleep
With your heady lullaby
Put me to sleep my pretty little baby
Now I know why they call you Lorelei

Die die die by the crack of dawn
Die die die tomorrow I'll be gone
Die die die by the crack of dawn
I found myself a grave in her arms
Yeah I found myself a tombstone in her arms.

EDIT: link to the original Irena's thread that started all, including links to all different versions made by fellow ABF members. Lots of very interesting takes !

https://forum.audiob.us/discussion/57449/request-for-a-collab-by-popular-demand-updated-with-links-to-all-completed-pieces#latest

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Comments

  • Nice! First one with lyrics! Svetlovska has certainly inspired some really different takes on this!

  • Dang @JanKun and @Svetlovska!

    A match made in (my idea of) Heaven!

  • Really nice, the vocals really take the concept to another level. Love it, love the vibe. The voice is spot on, the delivery suits the dark and edgy feel of the track to perfection.

    The short guitar solo is excellent as well.

  • The overall vibe reminds me a little of the Jesus And Mary Chain's cover of the Bo Diddley classic "Who Do You Love"

  • I can’t believe what you did with that viola. Brilliant! And Svetlovska’s noise, if I didn’t know already, I wouldn’t even notice it’s there. It sounds like freaked-out overdrive, but in a good way! It’s really in the spirit of Tom and Cave fusion. I'm a huge fan of both; I have all the albums from Tom and many from Cave. Bravo! 🤩

  • @richardyot said:
    The overall vibe reminds me a little of the Jesus And Mary Chain's cover of the Bo Diddley classic "Who Do You Love"

    When I was younger, I binge-listened to their "Psychocandy" and played Mercenary all night till I cracked the game and made a map. 🫣 It was before "Darklands" was published. I never heard of this Bo Diddley cover. It’s always good to hear something new from them.

  • @Luxthor said:

    @richardyot said:
    The overall vibe reminds me a little of the Jesus And Mary Chain's cover of the Bo Diddley classic "Who Do You Love"

    When I was younger, I binge-listened to their "Psychocandy" and played Mercenary all night till I cracked the game and made a map. 🫣 It was before "Darklands" was published. I never heard of this Bo Diddley cover. It’s always good to hear something new from them.

    It was on the B-side to April Skies, one of their best tracks. Also found on the really excellent compilation album “Barbed Wire Kisses”

    PS I’m also a huge off of Tom Waits and Nick Cave. Everything Tom Waits did after Heart Attack and Vine was amazing.

  • @michael_m said:
    Nice! First one with lyrics! Svetlovska has certainly inspired some really different takes on this!

    Thanks for listening. It is really interesting to see how people worked their way starting from the same point.
    Human brain and creativity never ceases to amaze.

  • This is great! Not sure of your influences - sounds 100% @JanKun.

  • Awesome. Played it to my kids, I am now momentarily cool again.

  • Yes… @Svetlovska certainly conjures up a “siren”. The Nick Cage reference comes shining through too. I really only heard his work when I started binging “Peaky Blinders” with its use of “Red Right Hand”.

    Another genre conquered by @jankun.

  • edited September 2023

    I am in awe of the creativity displayed by people on this forum. @Krupa , @Ailerom, @pbelgium @AlterEgo_UK, @michael_m , and now @JanKun all brought their own distinct styles to this little fragment of a thing, and turned it into stuff I just don’t have the skills to manage. Others have expressed interest too, and may or may not choose to publish things later, or just mess with the noises I made in their own private projects. I am very happy to have provoked such a flowering, and humbled to find myself in the unlikely role of muse!

    …And in @JanKun ’s case, that meant a whole freaking song! And what a dark, twisted little tale he tells. I love everything about it, from the singing-through-a-tin-megaphone edge to the vocals, to the wild viola that almost evokes Adrian Belew wigging out for Bowie in places, to the small but perfectly formed bent out of shape guitar solo. Damn, but I wish I could play like that. Or at all… :)

    Thank you all for such great takes on this. I’m reposting all the takes on my SoundCloud in an attempt to spread the love. Thanks again.

    I think I better go for a little lie down now… :)

  • @rottencat said:
    Dang @JanKun and @Svetlovska!

    A match made in (my idea of) Heaven!

    Thank you for the kind words, blushing now!
    Next, Let's make a "love triangle" collab in Heaven (or its counterpart!)

  • edited September 2023

    @richardyot said:
    Really nice, the vocals really take the concept to another level. Love it, love the vibe. The voice is spot on, the delivery suits the dark and edgy feel of the track to perfection.

    The short guitar solo is excellent as well.

    Thanks for listening, Richard! I kind of knew you would like this thing.
    Thank you for noticing the solo too. Being a teenager learning the guitar from the beginning of the 90s, I "forbade" myself to indulge into guitar soloing. Obviously for the "no solo" aesthetic of that specific era but also because of one performance in particular: Jimi Hendrix instrumental version of Albert King's "Born Under a Bad Sign". From the very first time I heard it and to this day, it became to me the ultimate blues soloing guitar statement. I remembered thinking to myself, "there is no point trying to do this anymore when something so perfect has already been done". Since then, no other blues player managed to take me in the kind of emotional state Hendrix takes me everytime I hear his version... maybe like a sax player could feel when hearing Giant Step the first time. I recently reconnected to this part of my own guitar playing I burried deep down all those years. And while this little short solo of mine can only blemish compared to Hendrix performance it is quoting, this is exactly where it comes from.

  • This is very cool. It surprised me how well the drone just lays there under all the other tracks and just gives the whole song a fullness that would be hard to get otherwise. The track sounds huge because of it. Really good mix and a really good song. I could listen to an album of this sort of thing.

  • I love guitar solos, as long as they're expressive. Shredding is boring, and guitarists who just play fast leave me cold, but expressive solos by players like J Mascis, or even less technical guitarists like Dean Wareham or Joey Santiago, can add a lot of emotion to a song.

    Hendrix is obviously a special case, a unique and exceptional player who completely changed the way the guitar is played. What I like best about him though isn't the technique, even though that is in itself remarkable, it's actually all the stuff he did besides playing the notes. Scraping the strings, percussive picking, all the weird little noises that he added on top of the actual notes he played. He used the guitar as percussion to embellish his playing - half the time you have no idea how the hell he got the guitar to make those noises.

    And I think that's what sets him apart. He wasn't just a technical prodigy, he was also incredibly creative and inventive with his approach to the instrument, and there has been no-one else like him.

  • edited September 2023

    @richardyot said:
    I love guitar solos, as long as they're expressive. Shredding is boring, and guitarists who just play fast leave me cold, but expressive solos by players like J Mascis, or even less technical guitarists like Dean Wareham or Joey Santiago, can add a lot of emotion to a song.

    Hendrix is obviously a special case, a unique and exceptional player who completely changed the way the guitar is played. What I like best about him though isn't the technique, even though that is in itself remarkable, it's actually all the stuff he did besides playing the notes. Scraping the strings, percussive picking, all the weird little noises that he added on top of the actual notes he played. He used the guitar as percussion to embellish his playing - half the time you have no idea how the hell he got the guitar to make those noises.

    And I think that's what sets him apart. He wasn't just a technical prodigy, he was also incredibly creative and inventive with his approach to the instrument, and there has been no-one else like him.

    Joey Santiago's solos are actually difficult to play right ! Loving his playing so much, he is so underrated !

  • @JanKun said:

    @richardyot said:
    I love guitar solos, as long as they're expressive. Shredding is boring, and guitarists who just play fast leave me cold, but expressive solos by players like J Mascis, or even less technical guitarists like Dean Wareham or Joey Santiago, can add a lot of emotion to a song.

    Hendrix is obviously a special case, a unique and exceptional player who completely changed the way the guitar is played. What I like best about him though isn't the technique, even though that is in itself remarkable, it's actually all the stuff he did besides playing the notes. Scraping the strings, percussive picking, all the weird little noises that he added on top of the actual notes he played. He used the guitar as percussion to embellish his playing - half the time you have no idea how the hell he got the guitar to make those noises.

    And I think that's what sets him apart. He wasn't just a technical prodigy, he was also incredibly creative and inventive with his approach to the instrument, and there has been no-one else like him.

    Joey Santiago's solos are actually difficult to play right ! Loving his playing so much, he is so underrated !

    I don't know if you've ever seen them live, but they usually do an extended vamp during Vamos where he plays the solo with drumsticks scraping the strings, or props the guitar up in front of the amp so it feeds back, it's an amazing noise-fest.

  • @richardyot said:

    @JanKun said:

    @richardyot said:
    I love guitar solos, as long as they're expressive. Shredding is boring, and guitarists who just play fast leave me cold, but expressive solos by players like J Mascis, or even less technical guitarists like Dean Wareham or Joey Santiago, can add a lot of emotion to a song.

    Hendrix is obviously a special case, a unique and exceptional player who completely changed the way the guitar is played. What I like best about him though isn't the technique, even though that is in itself remarkable, it's actually all the stuff he did besides playing the notes. Scraping the strings, percussive picking, all the weird little noises that he added on top of the actual notes he played. He used the guitar as percussion to embellish his playing - half the time you have no idea how the hell he got the guitar to make those noises.

    And I think that's what sets him apart. He wasn't just a technical prodigy, he was also incredibly creative and inventive with his approach to the instrument, and there has been no-one else like him.

    Joey Santiago's solos are actually difficult to play right ! Loving his playing so much, he is so underrated !

    I don't know if you've ever seen them live, but they usually do an extended vamp during Vamos where he plays the solo with drumsticks scraping the strings, or props the guitar up in front of the amp so it feeds back, it's an amazing noise-fest.

    Yeah saw them on their first reunion tour in 2004 in Barcelona primavera sound festival with the one and only Kim Deal ! Noise fest for sure. Not up to Sonic Youth should you ask me. Saw them a few times, each time was a lesson on how to play a guitar in the most unexpected way.

  • @JanKun said:

    @richardyot said:

    @JanKun said:

    @richardyot said:
    I love guitar solos, as long as they're expressive. Shredding is boring, and guitarists who just play fast leave me cold, but expressive solos by players like J Mascis, or even less technical guitarists like Dean Wareham or Joey Santiago, can add a lot of emotion to a song.

    Hendrix is obviously a special case, a unique and exceptional player who completely changed the way the guitar is played. What I like best about him though isn't the technique, even though that is in itself remarkable, it's actually all the stuff he did besides playing the notes. Scraping the strings, percussive picking, all the weird little noises that he added on top of the actual notes he played. He used the guitar as percussion to embellish his playing - half the time you have no idea how the hell he got the guitar to make those noises.

    And I think that's what sets him apart. He wasn't just a technical prodigy, he was also incredibly creative and inventive with his approach to the instrument, and there has been no-one else like him.

    Joey Santiago's solos are actually difficult to play right ! Loving his playing so much, he is so underrated !

    I don't know if you've ever seen them live, but they usually do an extended vamp during Vamos where he plays the solo with drumsticks scraping the strings, or props the guitar up in front of the amp so it feeds back, it's an amazing noise-fest.

    Yeah saw them on their first reunion tour in 2004 in Barcelona primavera sound festival with the one and only Kim Deal ! Noise fest for sure. Not up to Sonic Youth should you ask me. Saw them a few times, each time was a lesson on how to play a guitar in the most unexpected way.

    I saw Sonic Youth on the Goo tour, with Pavement as the support act. And you're right, they were extraordinary. So many guitars to accommodate the different tunings, and in the noisy sections the guitars were attacked with screwdrivers and god knows what else, incredible sounds. The thing that blew my mind is that somehow the cacophony was still really tuneful, a masterful blend of noise and melody.

  • @richardyot said:

    @JanKun said:

    @richardyot said:

    @JanKun said:

    @richardyot said:
    I love guitar solos, as long as they're expressive. Shredding is boring, and guitarists who just play fast leave me cold, but expressive solos by players like J Mascis, or even less technical guitarists like Dean Wareham or Joey Santiago, can add a lot of emotion to a song.

    Hendrix is obviously a special case, a unique and exceptional player who completely changed the way the guitar is played. What I like best about him though isn't the technique, even though that is in itself remarkable, it's actually all the stuff he did besides playing the notes. Scraping the strings, percussive picking, all the weird little noises that he added on top of the actual notes he played. He used the guitar as percussion to embellish his playing - half the time you have no idea how the hell he got the guitar to make those noises.

    And I think that's what sets him apart. He wasn't just a technical prodigy, he was also incredibly creative and inventive with his approach to the instrument, and there has been no-one else like him.

    Joey Santiago's solos are actually difficult to play right ! Loving his playing so much, he is so underrated !

    I don't know if you've ever seen them live, but they usually do an extended vamp during Vamos where he plays the solo with drumsticks scraping the strings, or props the guitar up in front of the amp so it feeds back, it's an amazing noise-fest.

    Yeah saw them on their first reunion tour in 2004 in Barcelona primavera sound festival with the one and only Kim Deal ! Noise fest for sure. Not up to Sonic Youth should you ask me. Saw them a few times, each time was a lesson on how to play a guitar in the most unexpected way.

    I saw Sonic Youth on the Goo tour, with Pavement as the support act. And you're right, they were extraordinary. So many guitars to accommodate the different tunings, and in the noisy sections the guitars were attacked with screwdrivers and god knows what else, incredible sounds. The thing that blew my mind is that somehow the cacophony was still really tuneful, a masterful blend of noise and melody.

    ...and at the end of the mayhem, they always fell in sync on their feet like cats! Incredible memories. Sad we won't be able to see them again...

  • @JanKun said:
    Thank you for noticing the solo too. Being a teenager learning the guitar from the beginning of the 90s, I "forbade" myself to indulge into guitar soloing. Obviously for the "no solo" aesthetic of that specific era but also because of one performance in particular: Jimi Hendrix instrumental version of Albert King's "Born Under a Bad Sign". From the very first time I heard it and to this day, it became to me the ultimate blues soloing guitar statement. I remembered thinking to myself, "there is no point trying to do this anymore when something so perfect has already been done". Since then, no other blues player managed to take me in the kind of emotional state Hendrix takes me everytime I hear his version... maybe like a sax player could feel when hearing Giant Step the first time. I recently reconnected to this part of my own guitar playing I burried deep down all those years. And while this little short solo of mine can only blemish compared to Hendrix performance it is quoting, this is exactly where it comes from.

    It is a very good solo JF, very fitting.
    Hendrix was a remarkable blues player. Apparently, Albert King disagreed - sounds a tad bitter.
    https://faroutmagazine.co.uk/albert-king-jimi-hendrix-the-blues/

  • edited September 2023

    Wow, this is amazing

    (I had to open it in the SoundCloud)

    I love the vocals man, like the guitar is great too but what you did with the vocals is really fitting for this man.

    Hahahah you guys think I’m going to go after this ??? Meanwhile, I’m trying to figure out which file it is to download and then I heard this!!!

    Where the towel rack guys?

    No I’m gong to take this as a challenge (is it like the first wav file in the folder? I tried to play it but it wouldn’t allow me to)

  • @pbelgium said:

    @JanKun said:
    Thank you for noticing the solo too. Being a teenager learning the guitar from the beginning of the 90s, I "forbade" myself to indulge into guitar soloing. Obviously for the "no solo" aesthetic of that specific era but also because of one performance in particular: Jimi Hendrix instrumental version of Albert King's "Born Under a Bad Sign". From the very first time I heard it and to this day, it became to me the ultimate blues soloing guitar statement. I remembered thinking to myself, "there is no point trying to do this anymore when something so perfect has already been done". Since then, no other blues player managed to take me in the kind of emotional state Hendrix takes me everytime I hear his version... maybe like a sax player could feel when hearing Giant Step the first time. I recently reconnected to this part of my own guitar playing I burried deep down all those years. And while this little short solo of mine can only blemish compared to Hendrix performance it is quoting, this is exactly where it comes from.

    It is a very good solo JF, very fitting.
    Hendrix was a remarkable blues player. Apparently, Albert King disagreed - sounds a tad bitter.
    https://faroutmagazine.co.uk/albert-king-jimi-hendrix-the-blues/

    There are always purists in every genre of music though, and as talented as they are, they seem to harbor resent for anyone who plays outside of traditional parameters.

    I always thought Hendrix did fine with the blues, but I’d imagine he would have struggled to play with limitations of any sort, so I wouldn’t expect it to sound traditional.

  • @Luxthor said:
    I can’t believe what you did with that viola. Brilliant! And Svetlovska’s noise, if I didn’t know already, I wouldn’t even notice it’s there. It sounds like freaked-out overdrive, but in a good way! It’s really in the spirit of Tom and Cave fusion. I'm a huge fan of both; I have all the albums from Tom and many from Cave. Bravo! 🤩

    Thanks a lot for listening ! Glad you liked the viola. Its sounds reminds me a lot of Warren Ellis both with the Bad Seeds and his trio, Dirty Three, which I was lucky to see a few times live ! They released very beautiful music ! If you haven't heard of them, I am sure you will like them !

  • @richardyot said:

    @Luxthor said:

    @richardyot said:
    The overall vibe reminds me a little of the Jesus And Mary Chain's cover of the Bo Diddley classic "Who Do You Love"

    When I was younger, I binge-listened to their "Psychocandy" and played Mercenary all night till I cracked the game and made a map. 🫣 It was before "Darklands" was published. I never heard of this Bo Diddley cover. It’s always good to hear something new from them.

    It was on the B-side to April Skies, one of their best tracks. Also found on the really excellent compilation album “Barbed Wire Kisses”

    PS I’m also a huge off of Tom Waits and Nick Cave. Everything Tom Waits did after Heart Attack and Vine was amazing.

    I also didn't know this Bo Diddley cover! Sounds great, I can definitely hear some similar sonic elements though their production is steps ahead !

    Just for songs like "The Mercy Seat" "From Her to Eternity" and "Stranger than Kindness" Nick Cave deserves eternal recognition and praise. These are real treasures!
    As for Tom Waits, I haven't heard a single track he made that didn't have that sparkling energy. His trilogy is another great treasure.

  • @Pxlhg said:
    Amazing!

    Thanks ! Glad you found something worth of interest in this track !

  • @belldu said:
    Awesome. Played it to my kids, I am now momentarily cool again.

    Do you mean your kids enjoyed it ?

  • @pbelgium said:
    This is great! Not sure of your influences - sounds 100% @JanKun.

    Paul, you know how to find your way with words. I am blushing now !

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