Audiobus: Use your music apps together.

What is Audiobus?Audiobus is an award-winning music app for iPhone and iPad which lets you use your other music apps together. Chain effects on your favourite synth, run the output of apps or Audio Units into an app like GarageBand or Loopy, or select a different audio interface output for each app. Route MIDI between apps — drive a synth from a MIDI sequencer, or add an arpeggiator to your MIDI keyboard — or sync with your external MIDI gear. And control your entire setup from a MIDI controller.

Download on the App Store

Audiobus is the app that makes the rest of your setup better.

Ableton Push 3 Standalone released !!!

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Comments

  • @Tarekith said:
    Create Songs from Scratch - Use Push’s fast workflows to create inspiring sketches and turn them into refined songs. Work with your hands and away from the computer to find your focus and flow.
    Perform Fluidly - Perform your music instinctually and fluidly in ways that suit your personal style and intent.
    Push is Your Standalone Hub - Push is the physical centerpiece of your setup. Connect your instruments, controllers, and services with high quality results.
    Create Continuously Between Instruments - Seamlessly move your music making material between Push and your other instruments. Don’t lose time or focus, continue your music making in the context that suits your needs in the moment.
    Fit to your needs - Modify aspects of Push to create an experience that fits your needs and preferences.
    Enabled through Learning - Push helps you learn the basics quickly, and provides resources on and off the instrument to develop your music making practice over time.
    Performant and Robust - Push is your musical companion - a trusted piece of technology. It is technically performant and blurs the line between instrument and your other electronic devices.
    Make Expressive Music - Create expressive melodies and rhythms with Push’s unique interface and approach to music creation.
    Design Personal Sounds - Create any sound you can imagine. Start with one of the diverse sounds from Push’s extensive library, or craft your own from scratch.
    Sample the World - Push has the connectivity and workflows to sample your world. Transform your samples into your own personal sound.
    Upgradable and Configurable - Push’s components are uniquely modular. Upgrade and change Push as technology or your needs change.
    Push Improves Over Time - Push becomes richer and more valuable over time as new experiences are added, performance is improved, and stability is maintained.

    ‘Use AI to write vague PR bullshite….’

  • @Tarekith said:
    For years now Ableton has refrained from giving too detailed info about what is coming for Live and their hardware. They used to be more open about this sort of thing on their forums, but when deadlines slipped or something they hinted was coming couldn't be implemented, people were assholes to them. So they stopped doing that.

    I'm actually surprised we got even this much from Jesse, even though it largely doesn't really tell us anything anyway.

    Right this really seemed to just echo their original mission statement at launch. I'd have to really let my mind go to think of what does this actually distill down to for features.

  • FWIW he’s been since posting more specific things he’d like to see added to P3S on the beta forums since he posted that. People should check in there if they want to know more or if they have specific suggestions to upvote.

  • edited June 4

    with the rumoured Microsoft SoCs will be based on Arm architecture will we see push 3 ARM chips upgrades in 2025/26? shouldn't be too hard to run them on linux.

    will be a nice bump in battery life!

  • edited June 4

    @Danny_Mammy said:
    with the rumoured Microsoft SoCs will be based on Arm architecture will we see push 3 ARM chips upgrades in 2025/26? shouldn't be too hard to run them on linux.

    will be a nice bump in battery life!

    Qualcomm is making those SoCs I think, and this means they'll likely appear in a similar form elsewhere too sooner or later.

    Getting the X86 translation/virtualization layer on Linux (e.g. Qemu) to work well with realtime audio could be a challenge. Might not be easy for MS to get their stuff to work with ASIO either on their OS, especially because they don't control it unlike Apple with core audio. Linux could even be easier.

    This stuff is handled by Windows like Apple does with Rosetta in MacOS for their chips. To avoid X86 translation Ableton would need to rewrite Ableton so that it compiles to ARM.

  • edited June 4

    @kirmesteggno said:

    @Danny_Mammy said:
    with the rumoured Microsoft SoCs will be based on Arm architecture will we see push 3 ARM chips upgrades in 2025/26? shouldn't be too hard to run them on linux.

    will be a nice bump in battery life!

    Qualcomm is making those SoCs I think, and this means they'll likely appear in a similar form elsewhere too sooner or later.

    Getting the X86 translation/virtualization layer on Linux (e.g. Qemu) to work well with realtime audio could be a challenge. Might not be easy for MS to get their stuff to work with ASIO either on their OS, especially because they don't control it unlike Apple with core audio. Linux could even be easier.

    This stuff is handled by Windows like Apple does with Rosetta in MacOS for their chips. To avoid X86 translation Ableton would need to rewrite Ableton so that it compiles to ARM.

    Ableton already runs on mac ARM so i don't think it's so far away from Linux arm. i maybe wrong, however its seems like a good possibility for future push 3 standalones.

  • @Danny_Mammy said:

    @kirmesteggno said:

    @Danny_Mammy said:
    with the rumoured Microsoft SoCs will be based on Arm architecture will we see push 3 ARM chips upgrades in 2025/26? shouldn't be too hard to run them on linux.

    will be a nice bump in battery life!

    Qualcomm is making those SoCs I think, and this means they'll likely appear in a similar form elsewhere too sooner or later.

    Getting the X86 translation/virtualization layer on Linux (e.g. Qemu) to work well with realtime audio could be a challenge. Might not be easy for MS to get their stuff to work with ASIO either on their OS, especially because they don't control it unlike Apple with core audio. Linux could even be easier.

    This stuff is handled by Windows like Apple does with Rosetta in MacOS for their chips. To avoid X86 translation Ableton would need to rewrite Ableton so that it compiles to ARM.

    Ableton already runs on mac ARM so i don't think it's so far away from Linux arm. i maybe wrong, however its seems like a good possibility for future push 3 standalones.

    True, totally forgot about Apple Silicon = ARM 🤦🏻‍♂️

  • Looks like the new 12.1 update for Live is finally starting to push the new features in for...push.

    https://www.ableton.com/en/release-notes/push-12-beta/

  • At last.

  • Good overview of the 12.1 updates for push by the product owner himself

  • How much interaction do you need to have with the Ableton software, if you have the suite license, in order to organize sounds and add new ones?

    I assume all folder management and sample adding is done via Ableton?

    My laptop is kinda crap and i kinda want this instrument but im not trying to buy a new MacBook right now!

  • @reasOne said:
    How much interaction do you need to have with the Ableton software, if you have the suite license, in order to organize sounds and add new ones?

    I assume all folder management and sample adding is done via Ableton?

    My laptop is kinda crap and i kinda want this instrument but im not trying to buy a new MacBook right now!

    Yeah, right now out of the box, you basically do file management in Ableton. Think of it like Windows Explorer or Mac Filer. It doesn't take a beefy box to do any of that. I couldn't imagine doing any "real" file/preset/template/project management just on the P3S itself. BUT...I really do believe the objective of this device is as a companion to the desktop Live.

    My workflow is sit down with the P3S anywhere and just start writing. I need to build a bit more of a default template with some routing for side chains and stuff already built in, but honestly I don't really care about that. I'm using the Push for "writing music" not for "mixing/arranging" music. The desktop is so much better suited for any of those detail things. But putting down ideas is endless.

    I know other people are all about performing and building out scenes and whatnot for trigger for a show, but I am not. HOWEVER, I am starting to work sets for building songs on the fly with the new Arrangement pack for Live12. I've gotten pretty accomplished at playing the Push like an instrument and I think that's probably why I enjoy the P3S so much. It is definitely a learning curve to play the isomorphic key layout and I honestly think this frustrates new owners the most. Knowing the patterns that form the chord structures takes discipline to learn.

    OR, you just don't care and poke around and have fun!

    Regardless, the question I have is what is your main goal with the instrument?

  • In 12.1 you an now setup the P3S as a wifi hotspot, so you can join all your devices that use Ableton Link and have then isolated to the push network (of course, your internet connectivity will be gone). I'm wondering if this is going to be maybe a conduit for Ableton Note to be able to transfer sets directly to the P3S.

  • edited July 8

    @drez said:
    In 12.1 you an now setup the P3S as a wifi hotspot, so you can join all your devices that use Ableton Link and have then isolated to the push network (of course, your internet connectivity will be gone). I'm wondering if this is going to be maybe a conduit for Ableton Note to be able to transfer sets directly to the P3S.

    It maybe possible to use the iPad in future as a UI for M4L devices as well possibly even using USB connection, it could be possible to integrate piano roll, arrangement and so on all in Note, as a control surface for P3S.

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