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Psycho Pinball Fury

Comments

  • An excellent name for an excellent track. So much energy. Frenetic, pulse-pounding energy. A banger from beginning to end.

  • @MadeofWax said:
    An excellent name for an excellent track. So much energy. Frenetic, pulse-pounding energy. A banger from beginning to end.

    When I first started this track, it reminded me of an 'evil' pinball machine that I used to play during my juvenile delinquent days, hanging around at the Tivoli bowling alley and pool hall... so I went with that. So many people take themselves too seriously. I'm just a wanker. I do this for shits and grins. As Marlon Brando said... The idea's to have a ball...

    Thanks, Mac.
    You "Get it"

  • Really dug this one! You tore it up.

  • @Ben said:
    Really dug this one! You tore it up.

    Thanks, Ben. Have a great week!

  • edited June 27

    Frenetica! Drums particularly good on this one. Like the fiddle at 1:05. The mess at 3:10, too.

  • McDMcD
    edited June 27

    Another classic musical construction. The violin triggered a Jean Luc Ponty recall for me.
    What was the name of the violinist in the Mahavishnu Orchestra... Jerry Goodman? He could play manic lines like this too. I wonder if he recorded after the group disbanded and Jan Hammer started doing TV scores and Billy Cobham made "Stratus" to reach a whole new level of notoriety as a composing drummer. What about Rick Laird (bass)?

    Google will know.

    UPDATE:

    In 1974, after Mahavishnu, Goodman released the album Like Children with Mahavishnu keyboard alumnus Jan Hammer. Starting in 1985 he recorded three solo albums for Private Music -- On the Future of Aviation, Ariel, and the live album It's Alive with collaborators including Fred Simon and Jim Hines—and went on tour with his own band, as well as with Shadowfax and The Dixie Dregs. He scored Lily Tomlin's The Search for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe and is the featured violinist on numerous film soundtracks, including Billy Crystal's Mr. Saturday Night and Steve Martin's Dirty Rotten Scoundrels . His violin can be heard on more than fifty albums from artists ranging from Toots Thielemans to Hall & Oates to Styx to Jordan Rudess to Choking Ghost to Derek Sherinian. Goodman has appeared on four of Sherinian's solo records - Inertia (2001), Black Utopia (2003), Mythology (2004), and Blood of the Snake (2006)

    In 1993, Goodman joined the American instrumental band, The Dixie Dregs, fronted by guitarist Steve Morse. Goodman appeared on one studio recording Full Circle (1994), and the live album "California Screamin'" (2000). In 1996 Session violist and producer Ray Tischer featured Goodman on the award-winning CD Canciones del Sol/Britt Bossa Orchestra (band)[1] on Tischer's original instrumental Toca del Angel.

    After an absence from the public eye in live concert, he toured in 2004 and 2005 with Gary Husband in his group Gary Husband’s Force Majeure, and appeared on the DVD Gary Husband's Force Majeure - Live at the Queen Elizabeth Hall. Even more recently, he played with the San Diego-based fusion group Hectic Watermelon and with Dream Theater in their album Black Clouds & Silver Linings. Goodman has also been a part of Billy Cobham's Spectrum 40 tour.

    Laird had a few more years before he hung up his performer's cleats in '82:

    After the band split, Laird moved to New York City and played with Stan Getz (a tour in 1977) and Chick Corea (a tour the following year). Laird put out one album as a leader, Soft Focus.[citation needed]

    Later career
    Laird retired as a performing musician in 1982. He became a successful photographer and bass teacher. He authored two intermediate- to advanced-level bass books. In 1999, Laird had started to compose on his daughter's iMac computer. He said: "I have no agenda. It's just for my own enjoyment. Besides, I've come to realise our main gig on this planet is not what we do for a living – it's to find out who we are, and to learn how to love ourselves and love others." Laird was one of a handful of musicians to play an S. D. Curlee, which was his principal fretted bass.

    In March 2009, Laird discovered a collection of photographs that he had taken of musical artists, including Miles Davis, Chick Corea, Wayne Shorter, the Mahavishnu Orchestra, Elvin Jones, Keith Jarrett and many others. Much of his collection was posted online.

    In early 2021, Laird's daughter announced that he had entered hospice care. Laird died of lung cancer in New City, Rockland County, New York on 4 July 2021, aged 80.

    I give credit to google but it's wikipedia that always has the details.

  • @Paulieworld said:

    Hi Paulie,
    Very alive musical composition.
    I love the beat of this song, truly a fury, fury of sounds.
    And the title really fits the musical vibe.
    Well done!
    Rene

  • @ReneAsologuitar said:

    @Paulieworld said:

    Hi Paulie,
    Very alive musical composition.
    I love the beat of this song, truly a fury, fury of sounds.
    And the title really fits the musical vibe.
    Well done!
    Rene

    Thanks Rene! I had a lot of fun with this one. I'm glad you liked it.

  • @LinearLineman said:
    Frenetica! Drums particularly good on this one. Like the fiddle at 1:05. The mess at 3:10, too.

    This one was a lot of fun. That fiddle part was one of the last tracks to go down. That obnoxious guitar was getting on my nerves so I cut it short, and had a few seconds to fill. It's ironic that @McD identified the inspiration for it! I was thinking, what's the last possible thing I could put in here? How about a deranged fiddle player... yeah, that's the ticket! Actually, I think the whole track is a mess, but a nice mess. Thanks!

  • @McD You nailed it. I was listening to 'Birds Of Fire' when I decided to write a 'really fast' song. JLP is one of my all time favorites, but I have memories of Jerry Goodman with 'The Flock' here in Chicago before he went on to become Jerry Goodman. I saw them at a bar that was know for letting underage kids in. They were incredible! This is one of my favorites...

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