Audiobus: Use your music apps together.

What is Audiobus?Audiobus is an award-winning music app for iPhone and iPad which lets you use your other music apps together. Chain effects on your favourite synth, run the output of apps or Audio Units into an app like GarageBand or Loopy, or select a different audio interface output for each app. Route MIDI between apps — drive a synth from a MIDI sequencer, or add an arpeggiator to your MIDI keyboard — or sync with your external MIDI gear. And control your entire setup from a MIDI controller.

Download on the App Store

Audiobus is the app that makes the rest of your setup better.

So, I took a look into Drambo and was inspired by Robyn

Maybe it’s something about visiting somewhere far away. Anyways, here’s a short video I did using Drambo. Turns out the “Layers Mixer” is a great way to stack multiple oscillators/sound generators.

">

link

(Also, sorta curious how I properly tackle Drambo during my workflow exploration…there’s a lot of things to cover in the app, as it’s both a standalone app and an AUv3 app. )

«1

Comments

  • @seonnthaproducer

    Cool video.
    Nicely done.

    Chat later.

  • Great! As a newb, watching from the sidelines, ill be curious how well you take to it :)

  • @Gravitas said:
    @seonnthaproducer

    Cool video.
    Nicely done.

    Chat later.

    Thanks man. Yeah, sounds good.

    @el_bo said:
    Great! As a newb, watching from the sidelines, ill be curious how well you take to it :)

    Thanks as well. Hoping to provide valuable info on Drambo.

  • @seonnthaproducer Nice job. I think the question to ask yourself in order to bring focus is the following,
    "What do I want to accomplish with Drambo?"
    A few answers might be something like:
    1. "I want to have a great Multitrack DAW to play all my auv3 Instruments and Effects."
    2. "I would love to slice and dice all these samples I have and have a lot of flexibility with routing and mangling."
    3. "I want to learn to build my own patches and play them."

    These are all 3 great answers. From my own personal use case I always do a mix of 1 and 2 to create everything I make in Drambo.

    FWIW, start small with Drambo and it will lead you to great places.

    How do you feel about using Samples in your music creation workflow?
    How do you feel about hosting all your auv3 instruments and effects in Drambo?
    How do you feel about building your own patches and effects in a modular system?

    Answer these 3 questions and you will have a potential path forward. :)

    Hope this helps.

    Cheers!

  • @echoopera said:
    @seonnthaproducer Nice job. I think the question to ask yourself in order to bring focus is the following,
    "What do I want to accomplish with Drambo?"
    A few answers might be something like:
    1. "I want to have a great Multitrack DAW to play all my auv3 Instruments and Effects."
    2. "I would love to slice and dice all these samples I have and have a lot of flexibility with routing and mangling."
    3. "I want to learn to build my own patches and play them."

    These are all 3 great answers. From my own personal use case I always do a mix of 1 and 2 to create everything I make in Drambo.

    FWIW, start small with Drambo and it will lead you to great places.

    How do you feel about using Samples in your music creation workflow?
    How do you feel about hosting all your auv3 instruments and effects in Drambo?
    How do you feel about building your own patches and effects in a modular system?

    Answer these 3 questions and you will have a potential path forward. :)

    Hope this helps.

    Cheers!

    Wow, thanks for the response. I’ll try doing just that. Let’s see…

    1. I’d like a way to create synths that I can use on multiple platforms
    2. I’d like to make a combination of AUv3 synths and effects that I can use for further music production
    3. I’d like to make a small collection of multi effects that I can use for Drums, Bass, Melody - Piano/Guitar, and Vocals.
    4. I’d like to make my own variation of some of the synths which I’m inspired by
    5. I’d like to manipulate samples well. Although I think it’ll be probably better if I store the samples in Koala then bring it into Drambo.

    If I was to start small…

    1. I’d like to make a quick and easy synthesizer
    2. I’d like to make a synthesizer which I can stack layers and effects
    3. I’d like to make a small collection or synthesizers in the style of Reason Compact/Groovebox where I can lay down ideas quickly

    For effects
    4. I’d like to make a multi effect rack with the effects I regularly use (compressor, reverb, delay, distortion, panning, EQ)
    5. I’d like to make unique combinations of effects (example- heavy reverb with fading panning delays )

    For samples,

    1. I think Drambo and Koala should be a great combination. I can manipulate sounds into Drambo and save it into Koala.

    I’m not sure about the MIDI or sequencing features of Drambo but it’ll be worth a look.

    Alright, I think I’ve got a good place to start. Thanks @echoopera

  • @seonnthaproducer said:
    4. I’d like to make a multi effect rack with the effects I regularly use (compressor, reverb, delay, distortion, panning, EQ)

    +1 for this!

    This, for me (even if I got nothing out of it), would be worth the initial investment. My only doubt would be concerning how much CPU and memory overhead the app itself would impose :)

  • @el_bo said:

    @seonnthaproducer said:
    4. I’d like to make a multi effect rack with the effects I regularly use (compressor, reverb, delay, distortion, panning, EQ)

    +1 for this!

    This, for me (even if I got nothing out of it), would be worth the initial investment. My only doubt would be concerning how much CPU and memory overhead the app itself would impose :)

    dRambo is really CPU efficient, you would surprised at the amount
    of instances you can instantiate in a project when using it as an Auv3.

  • it’s hard to beat drambo in immediacy of creating effects racks or layered instruments with complex routing. maybe bitwig is more powerful. and really, drambo is not that difficult to learn, it’s much more intuitive than other modular environments.

  • @Gravitas said:

    @el_bo said:

    @seonnthaproducer said:
    4. I’d like to make a multi effect rack with the effects I regularly use (compressor, reverb, delay, distortion, panning, EQ)

    +1 for this!

    This, for me (even if I got nothing out of it), would be worth the initial investment. My only doubt would be concerning how much CPU and memory overhead the app itself would impose :)

    dRambo is really CPU efficient, you would surprised at the amount
    of instances you can instantiate in a project when using it as an Auv3.

    Thanks! Of course, it will be determined by the model iPad and the amount of instruments in the project, but if dRambo (What is with that name, anyway?) isn't contributing too much it could be very useful.

  • @vasilymilovidov said:
    it’s much more intuitive than other modular environments.

    Thanks!

    I do find that comment interesting.

    I wonder if you'd already had modular experience beforehand. I don't, but have been looking into both dRambo and MiRack. And for whatever reason, strange as it may seem, I seem to be able to get my head around the idea of MiRack a lot more easily. Whether that would translate into real-world results, I'm not sure. But when i look at dR, it seems there's no clue as to any signal-path. I can't decipher why things would be connected to others.

    That's why I'm wondering if those that find it intuitive do so because they already understand modular signal-flow and common routings?

  • @el_bo said:

    @vasilymilovidov said:
    it’s much more intuitive than other modular environments.

    Thanks!

    I do find that comment interesting.

    I wonder if you'd already had modular experience beforehand. I don't, but have been looking into both dRambo and MiRack. And for whatever reason, strange as it may seem, I seem to be able to get my head around the idea of MiRack a lot more easily. Whether that would translate into real-world results, I'm not sure. But when i look at dR, it seems there's no clue as to any signal-path. I can't decipher why things would be connected to others.

    That's why I'm wondering if those that find it intuitive do so because they already understand modular signal-flow and common routings?

    It's more intuitive because the connections are generally already made for you by default, rather than you having to figure them out.

  • @Michael_R_Grant said:

    @el_bo said:

    @vasilymilovidov said:
    it’s much more intuitive than other modular environments.

    Thanks!

    I do find that comment interesting.

    I wonder if you'd already had modular experience beforehand. I don't, but have been looking into both dRambo and MiRack. And for whatever reason, strange as it may seem, I seem to be able to get my head around the idea of MiRack a lot more easily. Whether that would translate into real-world results, I'm not sure. But when i look at dR, it seems there's no clue as to any signal-path. I can't decipher why things would be connected to others.

    That's why I'm wondering if those that find it intuitive do so because they already understand modular signal-flow and common routings?

    It's more intuitive because the connections are generally already made for you by default, rather than you having to figure them out.

    But without seeing the flow/routing, how does one go about learning how to design something a little more complex? Or are you saying that dR is only linear and serial (This, as opposed to when i look at pictures of MiRack patches which have many divergent and parallel paths).

    Thanks :)

  • Drambo is as simple or as complex as you make it. 😉 it’s entirely up to you and what you want to get out of it.

  • I had a little understanding of signal flow in other modular systems before coming to Drambo - had seen Eurorack, fiddled with Mirack, and knew what CV, gates, etc. were.

    That said, Drambo does give you an indication of the signal path through it's color coding - additionally, you can tap on an input and it will show you the highlighted output (and this is where you can change its routing).

    To me, Drambo is the most intuitive (and quick) modular environment. Polyphony is handled behind the scenes and logical connections are all made automatically. But there isn't an immediate visual cue of signal flow that you get from a wired set up and this can be a real stumbling block. If you do get on with it, I think you can kind of just 'read' Drambo after awhile. Think of it like a rack mounted set up, where all the connections are on the back end.

  • @el_bo said:

    @Michael_R_Grant said:

    @el_bo said:

    @vasilymilovidov said:
    it’s much more intuitive than other modular environments.

    Thanks!

    I do find that comment interesting.

    I wonder if you'd already had modular experience beforehand. I don't, but have been looking into both dRambo and MiRack. And for whatever reason, strange as it may seem, I seem to be able to get my head around the idea of MiRack a lot more easily. Whether that would translate into real-world results, I'm not sure. But when i look at dR, it seems there's no clue as to any signal-path. I can't decipher why things would be connected to others.

    That's why I'm wondering if those that find it intuitive do so because they already understand modular signal-flow and common routings?

    It's more intuitive because the connections are generally already made for you by default, rather than you having to figure them out.

    But without seeing the flow/routing, how does one go about learning how to design something a little more complex? Or are you saying that dR is only linear and serial (This, as opposed to when i look at pictures of MiRack patches which have many divergent and parallel paths).

    Thanks :)

    i think it’s much easier to keep track of complex patches in drambo bc you can fold, layer and in general turn your clusters of modules into separate instruments. modular emulators tend to turn into spaghetti mess. drambo is basically your ableton live instrument view. and i think that once you get the signal flow it becomes quite natural.

  • you can route your signals in many ways and it’s all color-coded

  • @el_bo said:

    @Michael_R_Grant said:

    @el_bo said:

    @vasilymilovidov said:
    it’s much more intuitive than other modular environments.

    Thanks!

    I do find that comment interesting.

    I wonder if you'd already had modular experience beforehand. I don't, but have been looking into both dRambo and MiRack. And for whatever reason, strange as it may seem, I seem to be able to get my head around the idea of MiRack a lot more easily. Whether that would translate into real-world results, I'm not sure. But when i look at dR, it seems there's no clue as to any signal-path. I can't decipher why things would be connected to others.

    That's why I'm wondering if those that find it intuitive do so because they already understand modular signal-flow and common routings?

    It's more intuitive because the connections are generally already made for you by default, rather than you having to figure them out.

    But without seeing the flow/routing, how does one go about learning how to design something a little more complex? Or are you saying that dR is only linear and serial (This, as opposed to when i look at pictures of MiRack patches which have many divergent and parallel paths).

    Thanks :)

    You can see what a particular module is connected to by tapping on its input (the wavy line in a circle at the bottom of each module). The signal flow is left to right but not necessarily in a completely linear order. For example, an LFO module that you insert anywhere to the left of another module can be connected to it, whether that LFO is next door or way off to the left in terms of module order). Modules can also be connected to different tracks (with vertical order replicating the left to right signal flow), so an LFO in track 1 could be connected to a filter cutoff in track 4, for example).

    You can get very complex in Drambo, but it's been specifically designed to make the workflow easier by automatically establishing likely connections.

    For example, create a basic synth by:

    1. Opening a new project that has the basic '8 tracks (MIDI to CV)' template.
    2. Hit + on any track and insert an Oscillator from the GENERATOR section.
    3. Hit + again on the same track and add an Analog Filter from the PROCESSOR menu
    4. Hit + again on the same track and add Amp Env ADSR from the PROCESSOR menu.

    Now your signal flow is Oscillator -> Filter -> Amp Env ADSR. The connections between modules have automatically been made and the keyboard will work with it. Just this kind of basic operation is much more difficult to figure out in Mirack without knowing more about how to connect modules together.

    Want to control filter cutoff? Slide the top of any module slightly to the right to reveal a new +, which allows you to insert a module in between others. Select LFO from the MODULATOR menu. Tap the Cutoff knob in the Analog Filter module (any modulatable knob has a small arrow next to it) and then tap on the wavy line in a circle that's now showing at the bottom of the LFO module in order to connect the 2. A new LFO knob has now appeared next to the Cutoff knob. You can change the strength of the effect of the LFO on the cutoff by turning the new LFO knob... to the right for a positive effect, to the left for a negative effect.

  • also Drambo has the most ergonomic way of working with multioutput plugins on iOS in terms of routing each channel to an individual effects rack. and then p-locking those effects. also i rarely split my audio signal in other hosts or daws (except for sending it to some effects bus), but in drambo it feels natural to mix different processing lanes of your sound.

    in the end, the difference between drambo and modular for me is that in modular I usually don't really know what I want to do. it's about free flowing experimentations. it's a fun process, but i often get lost. in drambo the ideas of what I want to do come quite quickly and the process of getting there is much less esoteric than with modular. modular is kind of a box of toys, drambo — a box of tools.

  • edited April 6

    @seonnthaproducer said:

    If I was to start small…

    1. I’d like to make a quick and easy synthesizer

    Looks like you have a start at this...and it will teach you a lot :)

    1. I’d like to make a synthesizer which I can stack layers and effects

    Yep...it's perfect for this.

    1. I’d like to make a small collection or synthesizers in the style of Reason Compact/Groovebox where I can lay down ideas quickly

    >
    Yep...I have some personal go-to patches I've made as well...and love this about Drambo

    For effects
    4. I’d like to make a multi effect rack with the effects I regularly use (compressor, reverb, delay, distortion, panning, EQ)

    Go crazy with all of this...I love the LFO routing power of Drambo to drive and influence effect chains

    1. I’d like to make unique combinations of effects (example- heavy reverb with fading panning delays )

    Don't go too heavy on the VERB :)

    For samples,

    1. I think Drambo and Koala should be a great combination. I can manipulate sounds into Drambo and save it into Koala.

    Load Koala auv3 into Drambo and have your mind blown :)

    I’m not sure about the MIDI or sequencing features of Drambo but it’ll be worth a look.

    Drambo excels at this. I use it all the time for sequencing auv3 synths and my hardware. Drambo is iOS version of OctaTrack and DigiTakt IMHO.

    Alright, I think I’ve got a good place to start. Thanks @echoopera

    Sure thing. We're here to help :)
    Cheers!

  • edited April 7

    @echoopera said:
    Load Koala auv3 into Drambo and have your mind blown :)

    I haven’t done this much. Do you route other tracks into the Koala AUv3 using the audio input module and sample them? What’s your typical workflow here?

  • Thanks to everyone who has answered my questions. I would go through and answer them all, but I'm cognisant of my non-owner questions dominating Seonn's thread, and it seems like a place that might be better kept dedicated to his journey with dR.

    What I will say is I definitely have enough reasons to give it a go. I did say in another thread that even if I only used it like I've always used Reaktor i.e using and tweaking pre-builds (Usually only to the extent of cabling effects into an ensemble), it would be worth the asking price. I've never used a groovebox before, but that's probably the part of it I could more easily get my head around. And if not, no love lost...it'll still be a great Auv3 unit inside other workspaces.

    If I have other questions (No doubt I will), I'll start my own thread.

    Thanks, again :)

  • So I’ve spent this past week learning directly from someone unexpected…yep, it’s @Gravitas

    In this video, we’re taking a look into his setup. - What’s in a studio? Featuring Gravitas. and Drambo.

    ">

    source

  • @seonnthaproducer Cool! Now you've got a clue why the Drambo update is taking some time to get 'done' :sunglasses:

  • edited April 8

    @Samu said:
    @seonnthaproducer Cool! Now you've got a clue why the Drambo update is taking some time to get 'done' :sunglasses:

    Yeah, no kidding. I’m still trying to gather as much knowledge as I can from Gravitas. The app is INSANE!!!

    Edit: Thanks as well, @echoopera . Making that post encouraged me to look at Drambo logically, and figure out what I need to learn.

    @el_bo No worries. Learning as I’m going, so the conversations are super valuable.

  • edited April 8

    @seonnthaproducer said:
    So I’ve spent this past week learning directly from someone unexpected…yep, it’s @Gravitas

    In this video, we’re taking a look into his setup. - What’s in a studio? Featuring Gravitas. and Drambo.

    ">

    source

    Paused to say.. Look, Drambo Beta there. B)

    Shouldn't be too long now...

    These Art Kerns Sequencers are very nice (MidiSteps, MidiDreams).. but their shortcoming, hopefully, Drambo Update will replace them.

    Thanks... Back to the video..

  • Appreciate the support on this series. Here's Part 2.

    So, I sat down with Gravitas, and asked the question , " What do I want to accomplish with Drambo?"

    Shoutout to @echoopera for the guidance to ask the questions.

    ">

    Link

  • And here we go…new Drambo update featuring @Gravitas

    ">

    Link

  • @seonnthaproducer

    Nice one.

    I really like the piano clip.

    🙏🏾

  • @seonnthaproducer said:

    1. I’d like to make a small collection or synthesizers in the style of Reason Compact/Groovebox where I can lay down ideas quickly

    2. I think Drambo and Koala should be a great combination. I can manipulate sounds into Drambo and save it into Koala.

    these are the main things i want to do with it as well

  • @pr4y_4_beats said:

    @seonnthaproducer said:

    1. I’d like to make a small collection or synthesizers in the style of Reason Compact/Groovebox where I can lay down ideas quickly

    2. I think Drambo and Koala should be a great combination. I can manipulate sounds into Drambo and save it into Koala.

    these are the main things i want to do with it as well

    I’ll definitely tackle them when I’m back in home base. Gravitas and Echoopera did share some excellent points on them as well.

Sign In or Register to comment.