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Meatloaf R.I.P

He had a great voice and some fantastic songs.

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Comments

  • Real sad...

  • Sad day indeed… immense voice, personality and unforgettable songs.

  • edited January 21

    My mum used to crank the Bat out of hell album on the school run to get us hyped, I can't believe the news

  • I always liked his attitude. I used to work with a gifted but boorish fellow music journo who built his rep in part by asking stars the outrageous questions no one else would. After weeks of negotiating with Meat’s people, he secured an exclusive interview ahead of a UK tour. We cleared the front page of the mag for the piece. He met the man at his hotel. First question: “So Meat. Tell me: is it glandular, or what?”

    End of interview…

  • edited January 21

    Some amazing histrionic and stagy songs. In the best way. He could be like listening to fever dream. He was at his best partnered with Jim Steinman.

    I’ll have to give him a spin today in his honor.

  • edited January 21

    A blast from the past Samu.

  • @cyberheater said:
    A blast from the past Samu.

    Used to listen to it a LOT when I was younger (born -72).

  • Completely unexpected. Losing so many of the pop culture personalities that were present in my youth.

  • “That’s no way to pick your friends!”

  • edited January 21

    “Uhh… let me sleep on it…”

  • edited January 21

    His name is Meatloaf.

  • @Sawiton said:
    “That’s no way to pick your friends!”

    If you can find the story of how he got involved in this it’s really entertaining. He played the role in the first US stage show, which also involved playing Dr Scott, and after getting the part he was told he would have to wear fishnet stockings for the part of Dr Scott…

    Loved the Bat out of Hell track and album when it was released. Sounded so unlike anything else, due in large part to Meatloaf’s voice.

    RIP

  • Isn't theater the way that he and Jim Steinman hooked up?

  • @AlexY said:
    Isn't theater the way that he and Jim Steinman hooked up?

    I think so. Meatloaf was in a musical that Steinman wrote, and they agreed to collaborate outside of theater.

  • @Svetlovska said:
    First question: “So Meat. Tell me: is it glandular, or what?”

    End of interview…

    welp, its bee a while since i spit up my morning coffee. lol.

  • RIP. He just became a music legend. Too young.

  • I got to work with him once on a music video, he was really sweet and even gave me a hug. I have been a huge fan of his and Steinman’s for a long time. I just love that over the top stuff.

  • @JoyceRoadStudios said:
    “Uhh… let me sleep on it…”

    There's an article in today's New York Times on How Meat Loaf Made a Cult Favorite: ‘Paradise by the Dashboard Light.': Here's the link: https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/22/arts/music/meat-loaf-paradise-by-the-dashboard-light.html.

  • edited January 23

    Even though the "Bat Out Of Hell" album has the huge production sound I seem to remember Todd Rundgren saying that was recorded in an almost "live style" session with most of the musicians and singers in one room and very few overdubs. They rehersed so much they could do the songs right through in a take with Meatloaf doing a reference vocal that would be replaced later.

    In the BBC program "The Producers - Todd Rundgren" they get the original multitrack and solo each track to work out how the songs were put together. Worth listening to...

  • @Simon said:
    Even though the "Bat Out Of Hell" album has the huge production sound I seem to remember Todd Rundgren saying that was recorded in an almost "live style" session with most of the musicians and singers in one room and very few overdubs. They rehersed so much they could do the songs right through in a take with Meatloaf doing a reference vocal that would be replaced later.

    The original from 1977 or part 2 from 1993, as posted above?

  • @ralis said:
    I got to work with him once on a music video, he was really sweet and even gave me a hug. I have been a huge fan of his and Steinman’s for a long time. I just love that over the top stuff.

    Thanks.
    Made me smile and check the albums to hear them again.

  • edited January 23

    @tja said:
    The original from 1977 or part 2 from 1993, as posted above?

    1977.

    No label was interested in it and Todd convinced Bearsville (Albert Grossman) to pay for recording the album with a view to then selling it to another label for release. They shopped it around and nobody was interested. After 6 months they finally got a small label to release it and it sold 43 million copies. It's like everybody turning down signing The Beatles.

  • @Simon said:

    @tja said:
    The original from 1977 or part 2 from 1993, as posted above?

    1977.

    No label was interested in it and Todd convinced Bearsville (Albert Grossman) to pay for recording the album with a view to then selling it to another label for release. They shopped it around and nobody was interested. After 6 months they finally got a small label to release it and it sold 43 million copies. It's like everybody turning down signing The Beatles.

    Yes 😅😅😅

    Some will have had big regrets 😂

  • @Simon said:

    @tja said:
    The original from 1977 or part 2 from 1993, as posted above?

    1977.

    No label was interested in it and Todd convinced Bearsville (Albert Grossman) to pay for recording the album with a view to then selling it to another label for release. They shopped it around and nobody was interested. After 6 months they finally got a small label to release it and it sold 43 million copies. It's like everybody turning down signing The Beatles.

    I seem to remember that Todd Rundgren ended up putting money into producing the album rather than making money from it (and recouping it later after the deal was signed).

  • His name was Robert Paulson!

    RIP

  • edited January 23

    @michael_m said:
    I seem to remember that Todd Rundgren ended up putting money into producing the album rather than making money from it (and recouping it later after the deal was signed).

    Wikipedia says that Todd paid for the album himself, but I don't think that is the story that Todd tells in the interview in the BBC's "The Producers - Todd Rundgren" show.

    I got the impression that Todd helped get funding, mainly from Albert Gossman (Bob Dylan's ex manager and owner of Bearsville Records).

  • A wonderfully entertaining performer, so glad I got to see him live in his heyday. He will be much missed.

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