Audiobus: Use your music apps together.

What is Audiobus?Audiobus is an award-winning music app for iPhone and iPad which lets you use your other music apps together. Chain effects on your favourite synth, run the output of apps or Audio Units into an app like GarageBand or Loopy, or select a different audio interface output for each app. Route MIDI between apps — drive a synth from a MIDI sequencer, or add an arpeggiator to your MIDI keyboard — or sync with your external MIDI gear. And control your entire setup from a MIDI controller.

Download on the App Store

Audiobus is the app that makes the rest of your setup better.

Playground

Ravenscroft275, BASSalicious, PureSynthPlatinum, SWAM Tenor Sax and Trumpet.

Comments

  • I think you should do a series where you post projects with "ID" numbers and the audience suggests titles.

    Knowing this was called "Playground" influenced my listening expectations. This music is dripping with regret and the point of view of an aging person. But I suspect the sing song chord work made you think of children's tunes... "See Saw Marjorie Daw".

    Anyway, what names would people propose to lay the expectations for this music? I'd venture "Re-visiting Youth - an Artificial Unreality".

    PS - I think you should dial back the vibrato rate on the sax and trumpet. Very unhip style.
    Guy Lombardo died for his own sins.

  • edited January 7

    @McD, I think you are mistaking nostalgia for regret. There is frequently some melancholy in remembrance of things past. Hence the vintage playground picture. I refer you to one Martin Sloan, the central character(s) in Rod Serling’s “Walking Distance” for further clarity,

    As for the vibrato, it is also in keeping with a reminiscence of the past. I do like the idea of audience participation for title choice, however. I might try that.

  • Well it’s a pretty little piece. Sounds to me like a song about an older person reflecting on playing long ago. Well done.

    This isn’t a criticism in any way, just a reaction from my trumpet playing ears. My first reaction to hearing bold high trumpet notes over on a slow and soft songs are always, “that sounds out of place”. Maybe it’s just because that doesn’t happen very often in real trumpet playing settings, without a mute. But still it’s only at the beginning. When I get use to it it grows on me and works. And I think the swarm sounds are very good.

    I have enjoyed hearing everything you posted here.

  • edited January 7

    You got it @Dav. Of course, I always name my tracks after completion, so that’s just what it sounded like to me, too.

    Originally, I played the entire horn line on the SWAM Tenor. Then I broke it into parts played by the sax, trumpet or together. I think you’re referring to the trumpet phrases starting at 4:17. When I played that part with the trumpet it really jumped out at me, again it sounded like something from the 50s, a tv theme or thereabouts… Science Fiction Theater (with Truman Bradley, LOL), maybe?

    Here that is… it still grips me in a spine chill of nostalgia… and dig the high tech!

    How bout the vibrato? As you read, it piqued our good friend @McD.😔😉😎

  • @LinearLineman said:
    @McD, I think you are mistaking nostalgia for regret. There is frequently some melancholy in remembrance of things past. Hence the vintage playground picture. I refer you to one Martin Sloan, the central character(s) in Rod Serling’s “Walking Distance” for further clarity,

    As for the vibrato, it is also in keeping with a reminiscence of the past. I do like the idea of audience participation for title choice, however. I might try that.

    It would encourage comments... getting them is always a problem. Many will listen but few
    provide any feedback. It's typical of most internet communities... sometimes it's like going into a dark room full of people and singing... then silence.

    "Thank you for that tremendous round of indifference."

    What that creates is a community of creatives where 98% won't post any work at all which is really shame. I know there's great work out there where the artist has been beaten down by off hand comments from people that have little interest in music they haven't had validated by the media... then they immediately compare anything new to the current trends and wonder "Do you expect anyone to buy this?". I'm suspect it's worse for the visual arts.

    You should share some stories related to selling visual art in your prime business life.

  • @McD, my experience with illustrators was strictly commercial. We would send a sample portfolio and if it had a decent cow and the client was looking for a cow you had a good chance. If you only had a decent horse…. It was… well, can he paint a cow?

  • This really is a lovely piece. In spite of the title and comments I kept picturing a couple dancing in front of a big band like the ones from the 1940’s. I guess we all filter the music we hear through our own experience, movies we’ve watched, television shows, etc. Always a pleasure to listen to your music.

  • Thank you @MadeofWax. The common thread seems to be something from the long ago. People do perceive music subjectively, of course, and many have visuals as well. Strangely, I never have a visual when I listen to music. Emotions, yes, pictures, no.

  • -27°C Cold Morning.. freshly fallen snow.. glistening diamonds from the sunlight.. a Winter Playground.. (looking out my front window this morning)
    Great performance @LinearLineman.. I thought the sax + trumpet were just right.. you have to love those SWAM instruments.. the ability to set a mood.. quickly.. spontaneously.. time for me to invest in some of them.. thanks for sharing that sliver of glitter.. 🙏

  • Thank you so much @royor. Your words mean a lot to me. Often when someone posts a strong comment (positive or negative) I listen again with those sentiments in mind. It was wonderful to imagine my playing against the ultra cold and glistening landscape you describe. The piano took on some of that twinkling quality. The horns felt expressive and more austere. As I said earlier, I do not visualize music, but I can set it against an image, like a soundtrack from a movie. Your imagery was fantastic and magical. So, thank you! Now, where the heck do you live? It sounds like the Arctic Circle. Was it you who once mentioned doing work in Antarctica?

  • I think this really very lovely, definitely has the spirit sipping coffee by a crackling fireplace while distant memories are drifting across ones mind like a faint glimpse of smoke rippling from a chimney into the overcast sky on a quiet winters day. It gave me sensations of looking out at a confusing, complicated, and chaotic world with the warmth of the memories emanating from my soul like the embers in the fireplace. I really dig the vibe-rato you created here with this one :D

  • Thanks very much for listening @AppleJax. Beautiful word pictures.

  • McDMcD
    edited January 9

    @LinearLineman said:
    As I said earlier, I do not visualize music, but I can set it against an image, like a soundtrack from a movie.

    Cool. How about we post images to inspire new compositions:

    https://forum.audiob.us/uploads/editor/fd/uxjxc62o7ih6.png

    "Midnight snack... busted."

  • @LinearLineman Ha! Not the Arctic Circle nor Antarctica (never worked there either).. Very much feels like that here now in the sunny but freezing prairie province of Alberta.. the streak of cold we’ve had here since around Christmas - 14 of the last 16 days have had daily highs of -20°C or below - is the second longest since 1969.. that streak lasted 26 days straight.. yup, crazy.. Many days have been -30°C (with windchill) or lower for 2 weeks now.. No skating, no skiing, no winter biking.. my favourite winter playground pastimes.. it’s just too damn cold 🥶 I do enjoy the bitterly chilly days too, just not so many in a row.. 😁 Definitely inspiring for music though..
    Listening to Playground this morning was the perfect sonic landscape for what I was actually viewing.. Chickadees, Nuthatches + all.. glad you enjoyed the imagery from afar..

  • @royor, ahhh… I reversed the Fahrenheit and Centigrade. Thought you were at like -50! Still, it sounds bleedin’ freezin’. Stay warm, my friend and keep painting those pictures.

  • I love when you leave this huge amount of space at times during your solo piano. It just tickles my mind. I had to listen again.

  • This was great! I’ve had this open in a tab and have been relistening several times. Love the notes at 2:26 5:21. The entire thing felt just very complete to me, everything in the right place.

  • Thank you @Blipsford_Baubie. Do you mean space for the horns,or stretched out notes in the piano part?

    Glad you liked it @JudasZimmerman. Those two spots… I’m surprised they grabbed you…they stood out to me, too. Have a wonderful Sunday!

  • @LinearLineman said:
    Thank you @Blipsford_Baubie. Do you mean space for the horns,or stretched out notes in the piano part?

    The piano part, before the horns.
    In particular, around:
    1:30 ish - the melody notes
    2:15:2:20 all piano voices

  • @Blipsford_Baubie, ah, I see. I think it’s the outcome of breathing and waiting.

  • @McD said:
    I think you should … post projects with "ID" numbers

    I think you're right @McD.
    @LinearLineman needs a scholarly individual to catalogue his output like Köchel did for Mozart. Then each piece would have a number after the title.

    Wikipedia:

    For unambiguous identification of works by Mozart, a Köchel catalogue number is used. This is a unique number assigned, in regular chronological order, to every one of his known works. A work is referenced by the abbreviation "K." or "KV" followed by this number. The first edition of the catalogue was completed in 1862 by Ludwig von Köchel.

Sign In or Register to comment.