Audiobus: Use your music apps together.

What is Audiobus?Audiobus is an award-winning music app for iPhone and iPad which lets you use your other music apps together. Chain effects on your favourite synth, run the output of apps or Audio Units into an app like GarageBand or Loopy, or select a different audio interface output for each app. Route MIDI between apps — drive a synth from a MIDI sequencer, or add an arpeggiator to your MIDI keyboard — or sync with your external MIDI gear. And control your entire setup from a MIDI controller.

Download on the App Store

Audiobus is the app that makes the rest of your setup better.

Solar Cell Power for Mobile Music Producers | haQ attaQ

Solar power has now become part of my Mobile Music Studio setup. I recently purchased a Solar Cell USB charger and I've been testing it thoroughly. In the second episode of the haQ attaQ Outdoors Series, I'm showing you the results of my tests and I'm also sharing my thoughts around portable solar cell panels in general. I gotta admit, it does feel pretty good being able to basically run my mobile music setup of sun power.

haQattaQ

Comments

  • Cool will watch this! I have a 20 watt solar panel I use to charge two big power banks to charge my devices it’s great!!

  • mobile music devices and portable solar systems are a perfect fit.

  • Wow, great video. Growing up, my dad had an interest in solar power and I had access to several books about solar energy. They were more oriented towards passive and active solar heating than electrical generation, but it “sparked” an interest and has been a subject I have kept a finger in over several decades. You did a great job introducing the topic! I have two hobbies that get most of my money: music making and backpacking, hiking, and camping. I bought a small field recorder earlier this year and once it cools off this fall I will take that on some backpacking trips. Other than that the two hobbies haven’t mixed. I like the sounds of Nature when I am in the woods. Last year we invested in gear to make car camping more comfortable for us. One of the items was a solar panel and battery pack combo from Jackery.com. We got the small 240 watt/hour battery pack but the bigger 100 watt solar panel. The justification was we live in the Southeast USA and hurricanes can knock power out for days. This setup lets us keep devices charged, run some LED lights, and keep a fan running. I have taken the battery pack out on the porch and used it to power my iPad, nanoKEYS and JBL Charge. We also invested in quite a few rechargeable AA and AAA batteries and a charger, so I can charge batteries with the sun. You have inspired me to get some music gear out into the woods with our camping gear when it cools off some. Just my opinion, but the hanging-the-panel-off-your-backpack thing wouldn’t work for me as the angle the panel hangs at isn’t conducive to capturing the sun’s rays, plus most of my hiking is in the woods. Again, great video!

  • I have an Anker solar panel in my “go music bag” and it powers my 1010 Blackbox via battery banks, and I have a spare bank so I can charge the iPad mini too. It’s a great setup, and I love you’ve made a video about it!

  • I don't see the point of this unless one is playing a long ass set above the polar circle

  • edited July 20

    .

  • @ehehehe said:
    I don't see the point of this unless one is playing a long ass set above the polar circle

    The common sentiment when using technolgy in the wild is that extra powerbanks are much more useful unless one plans to stay outside for weeks at a time. It’s both a cost and weight issue.

  • edited July 21

    I spend most of my time in the woods, 6-9 months a year. In a tipi, not too tall, one that I can manage and build by myself. One waterproof 100W panel with cable extension, and a 400Wh power bank. That is the main station for powering my battery bricks for monitors and lights. Which is done during the day where there is an abundance of light in summer time.

    Then there is another 100W panel, that is foldable, but not waterproof. Always running for that panel when there is a summer shower, you never know if it is just a shower or a longer thunderstorm. You know sometimes, but not always. This panel I use for three small 88Wh power banks. All power banks can charge and deliver at the same time. This is very important, because with this option you can harness much more solar energy. Let me explain: older power banks like the ones I use, can only charge at a low amperage. So when your panel provides 85W (that is the optimum what I get with my 100W panel, which is most often a theoretical value), the power bank may only use 40W, the rest is not used. These high times, around noon, are especially lucrative, because you can hook up hungry consumers at the same time, and use the other 45W for other purposes.

    What I found out this year, also with an expansion of one cheap consumer power bank, is to attach said power bank to the 5V USB output port of the 400Wh power bank. You may attach multiple smaller power banks to the large power bank, and keep a total of 600-700Wh charged during the day. At night you have all options. Remember, this is all off grid. But it feels like on the grid. Just a different one. The solar powered one.

    You know, in the end everything is solar power. Our food, the water circulation, etc.

    New technologies (smaller devices with less conversion losses, direct DC input, while maintaining a high degree of performance in CPU and GPU, and excellent software) opened the way to a new way of expression. Coupled with solar systems it is a gateway to (partly) independence. However, new solar systems (2021) can charge at much higher amperage, several hundreds of Watts. If you are in the business, keep an eye on them. Because with those you can simply add panels, and charge at full efficiency; with older power banks like mine one has to juggle more. Much more. These new ones are still Lithium-based, but optimised for fast charging.

    Just for fun, a list of the solar powered devices this year:

    • 1 iPhone 6S+
    • 2 iPad Pro large
    • 1 Aputure AL-MW
    • 1 Aputure B7c set (8 B7c bulbs)
    • 1 chinese RGB LED panel (forgot the brand name)
    • several Sony NP power bricks for 2000-3000 nit monitors
    • 2 BMD Pocket 4k cinema cameras
    • 1 ATEM Mini Pro streaming switcher
    • 2 Sony RX-10M3 cameras
    • 1 Sony handycam
    • 1 Moza Slypod
    • 1 Zhyiun Crane 3 Lab gimbal

    • sometimes charge a high-end laptop with a 200+W PSU. Just to top the charge, when I use it off grid for creating and copying streaming keys. Or for quick actualisations and downloads. Usually I use this laptop as a workstation on grid (there is a house not far away from my tipi), where I do the editing and colour correction in Resolve. Such a laptop clearly exceeds the capacity of my solar system.

    • sometimes charge a battery-driven Dremel tool
    • sometimes charge a battery-driven Makita saber saw

    https://ecoflow.com/

    https://www.jackery.com/

    https://maxoak.net/

    https://www.eco-worthy.com/

    https://www.renogy.com/

    https://www.goalzero.com/

    https://www.sistech.com/

    https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/bigblue-cellpowa500-develop-your-off-grid-space#/

    https://www.jauch.com/en-FR/products/battery_technology/mobile-lithium-energy-storage/getPrm/energysolutions/SOLARENERGIE/

    https://www.conrad.ch/de/p/power-traveller-falcon-40-ptl-fls040-solar-ladegeraet-ladestrom-solarzelle-3000-ma-40-w-1666481.html

    (current links, not all ‘approved’ by experience)

  • @Phil999 said:

    Cool. What do you do for heating? Or cooling? And how do you cook and refrigerate food? If not tech, what strategies to utopia employ?

  • @Sawiton said:
    Wow, great video. Growing up, my dad had an interest in solar power and I had access to several books about solar energy. They were more oriented towards passive and active solar heating than electrical generation, but it “sparked” an interest and has been a subject I have kept a finger in over several decades. You did a great job introducing the topic! I have two hobbies that get most of my money: music making and backpacking, hiking, and camping. I bought a small field recorder earlier this year and once it cools off this fall I will take that on some backpacking trips. Other than that the two hobbies haven’t mixed. I like the sounds of Nature when I am in the woods. Last year we invested in gear to make car camping more comfortable for us. One of the items was a solar panel and battery pack combo from Jackery.com. We got the small 240 watt/hour battery pack but the bigger 100 watt solar panel. The justification was we live in the Southeast USA and hurricanes can knock power out for days. This setup lets us keep devices charged, run some LED lights, and keep a fan running. I have taken the battery pack out on the porch and used it to power my iPad, nanoKEYS and JBL Charge. We also invested in quite a few rechargeable AA and AAA batteries and a charger, so I can charge batteries with the sun. You have inspired me to get some music gear out into the woods with our camping gear when it cools off some. Just my opinion, but the hanging-the-panel-off-your-backpack thing wouldn’t work for me as the angle the panel hangs at isn’t conducive to capturing the sun’s rays, plus most of my hiking is in the woods. Again, great video!

    Thank you for peer-reviewing my work! And massive thanks for giving us your background story.

    I’ve just started delving into the wonderful world of solar cell panels. I was a bit worried I wasn’t going to be able to present the topic well enough. :)

  • @sevenape said:
    Cool will watch this! I have a 20 watt solar panel I use to charge two big power banks to charge my devices it’s great!!

    Have you har it for a long time? In sondering Joe its been farins so far?

  • @ehehehe said:
    I don't see the point of this unless one is playing a long ass set above the polar circle

    @ehehehe said:

    @ehehehe said:
    I don't see the point of this unless one is playing a long ass set above the polar circle

    The common sentiment when using technolgy in the wild is that extra powerbanks are much more useful unless one plans to stay outside for weeks at a time. It’s both a cost and weight issue.

    Fair points. Morse power packs are definitely Hovewer I feel that having a solar panel is good too. Why not collect that all that power while you can into third pack?

    I think it’s a good addition to have. I feel that now anyway. Ask me again In a year and we’ll see how I feel then.

  • @Phil999 said:
    I spend most of my time in the woods, 6-9 months a year. In a tipi, not too tall, one that I can manage and build by myself. One waterproof 100W panel with cable extension, and a 400Wh power bank. That is the main station for powering my battery bricks for monitors and lights. Which is done during the day where there is an abundance of light in summer time.

    Then there is another 100W panel, that is foldable, but not waterproof. Always running for that panel when there is a summer shower, you never know if it is just a shower or a longer thunderstorm. You know sometimes, but not always. This panel I use for three small 88Wh power banks. All power banks can charge and deliver at the same time. This is very important, because with this option you can harness much more solar energy. Let me explain: older power banks like the ones I use, can only charge at a low amperage. So when your panel provides 85W (that is the optimum what I get with my 100W panel, which is most often a theoretical value), the power bank may only use 40W, the rest is not used. These high times, around noon, are especially lucrative, because you can hook up hungry consumers at the same time, and use the other 45W for other purposes.

    What I found out this year, also with an expansion of one cheap consumer power bank, is to attach said power bank to the 5V USB output port of the 400Wh power bank. You may attach multiple smaller power banks to the large power bank, and keep a total of 600-700Wh charged during the day. At night you have all options. Remember, this is all off grid. But it feels like on the grid. Just a different one. The solar powered one.

    You know, in the end everything is solar power. Our food, the water circulation, etc.

    New technologies (smaller devices with less conversion losses, direct DC input, while maintaining a high degree of performance in CPU and GPU, and excellent software) opened the way to a new way of expression. Coupled with solar systems it is a gateway to (partly) independence. However, new solar systems (2021) can charge at much higher amperage, several hundreds of Watts. If you are in the business, keep an eye on them. Because with those you can simply add panels, and charge at full efficiency; with older power banks like mine one has to juggle more. Much more. These new ones are still Lithium-based, but optimised for fast charging.

    Just for fun, a list of the solar powered devices this year:

    • 1 iPhone 6S+
    • 2 iPad Pro large
    • 1 Aputure AL-MW
    • 1 Aputure B7c set (8 B7c bulbs)
    • 1 chinese RGB LED panel (forgot the brand name)
    • several Sony NP power bricks for 2000-3000 nit monitors
    • 2 BMD Pocket 4k cinema cameras
    • 1 ATEM Mini Pro streaming switcher
    • 2 Sony RX-10M3 cameras
    • 1 Sony handycam
    • 1 Moza Slypod
    • 1 Zhyiun Crane 3 Lab gimbal

    • sometimes charge a high-end laptop with a 200+W PSU. Just to top the charge, when I use it off grid for creating and copying streaming keys. Or for quick actualisations and downloads. Usually I use this laptop as a workstation on grid (there is a house not far away from my tipi), where I do the editing and colour correction in Resolve. Such a laptop clearly exceeds the capacity of my solar system.

    • sometimes charge a battery-driven Dremel tool
    • sometimes charge a battery-driven Makita saber saw

    https://ecoflow.com/

    https://www.jackery.com/

    https://maxoak.net/

    https://www.eco-worthy.com/

    https://www.renogy.com/

    https://www.goalzero.com/

    https://www.sistech.com/

    https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/bigblue-cellpowa500-develop-your-off-grid-space#/

    https://www.jauch.com/en-FR/products/battery_technology/mobile-lithium-energy-storage/getPrm/energysolutions/SOLARENERGIE/

    https://www.conrad.ch/de/p/power-traveller-falcon-40-ptl-fls040-solar-ladegeraet-ladestrom-solarzelle-3000-ma-40-w-1666481.html

    (current links, not all ‘approved’ by experience)

    Omg, thank you so much for all this info. I had a blast reading through this. 👊🏼

  • @jakoB_haQ said:

    @sevenape said:
    Cool will watch this! I have a 20 watt solar panel I use to charge two big power banks to charge my devices it’s great!!

    Have you har it for a long time? In sondering Joe its been farins so far?

    I think 3 or 4 years. Probably 3. Works great, the power banks need replacing but the panel is awesome.

  • @sevenape I can’t believe you were able to read my comment. I’m sorry, I had my keyboard set to Swedish again and my ADHD brain did not read through what I wrote before I posted. Thank you for your answer! 👊🏼

  • @jakoB_haQ said:
    @sevenape I can’t believe you were able to read my comment. I’m sorry, I had my keyboard set to Swedish again and my ADHD brain did not read through what I wrote before I posted. Thank you for your answer! 👊🏼

    :D no worries! I receive whatsapp messages like this from my brother ALL the time! I get used to it!

  • @audiobussy said:

    Cool. What do you do for heating? Or cooling? And how do you cook and refrigerate food? If not tech, what strategies to utopia employ?

    I make a fire almost every day. There's a lot of dead wood after this heavy winter. And I cook on the fire, of course. For cooling, a hole in the ground (in a shadow area or inside the tipi) keeps food fresh and cool.

  • @Phil999 said:

    @audiobussy said:

    Cool. What do you do for heating? Or cooling? And how do you cook and refrigerate food? If not tech, what strategies to utopia employ?

    I make a fire almost every day. There's a lot of dead wood after this heavy winter. And I cook on the fire, of course. For cooling, a hole in the ground (in a shadow area or inside the tipi) keeps food fresh and cool.

    Impressive. Any pictures? Sounds like the real deal

  • edited July 22

    @Phil999 That is a sweet setup! Just out of curiosity, what do you do to appease the capitalist pimps? I’m not familiar with some of the gear you are using but it sounds like photography or video something. I’d love to live more off grid. We are planning a move to the countryside next year. While my responsibilities will keep me tied in, there will be room to try some new things (mostly permaculture techniques for food production) and the option of occasionally pitching a tarp and sleeping closer to the earth.

    Just saw your thread on mobile computing. Now I see some of the gear you keep running. Sweet!

  • I need not much money, and therefore don’t have to play the game all the time. I do have some regular professions and jobs, but most of the time it’s my own research I spend my time on. Lucky bastard, so to speak.

    I can only encourage you and all people to try out new things if possible. Many things one hasn’t thought about much will change, generally for the better. Sleeping close to the earth, learning about soil and plant growth, creating meals with wild plants, establishing a new relation to the own body and its functions, etc. While at the same time using latest tech and software for work and music. It is a great time to live.

    No images of gear and such, but the video of last year’s storm gives some impressions about where and how I live. I may do a short video of gear this week.

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