Audiobus: Use your music apps together.

What is Audiobus?Audiobus is an award-winning music app for iPhone and iPad which lets you use your other music apps together. Chain effects on your favourite synth, run the output of apps or Audio Units into an app like GarageBand or Loopy, or select a different audio interface output for each app. Route MIDI between apps — drive a synth from a MIDI sequencer, or add an arpeggiator to your MIDI keyboard — or sync with your external MIDI gear. And control your entire setup from a MIDI controller.

Download on the App Store

Audiobus is the app that makes the rest of your setup better.

OT - What are you cooking? Is it good?

Anyone here like to cook? Whatcha got? What's your speciality?

Comments


  • Working on this right now...

  • edited May 1

    A different menu every day. The fridge will tell me what to do.
    Had some smoked fish with mustard, cream, curry and lemon sauce, served with spinach and mushrooms fried in butter yesterday. Never did this before but it was surprisingly tasty.
    Oh, and potatos.

  • I make a mean poor mans raman lately:

    The broth isn’t as good as a true bone both process but does well enough in a pinch. Takes about 20min to prepare.

  • found a thai market within walking distance, so been making a lot of authentic thai foods. Yellow Curry and Chicken Larb are my favorite so far.

  • @drez Ramen is nothing to sneeze at. There are a million ways to cook it so that it's not just the packets and water, so go for it. Looks delicious!

    @shinyisshiny We've got a fairly large Korean market around here so my wife goes there to get kimchi makings and whatnot. Man, I'd love to peruse a Thai market - gotta see where the closest one is around here.

  • @rs2000 That sounds great!

  • edited May 1

    Just made hotdogs ( with that Maille dijon mustard ) Always prefered English mustard compared to supermarket dijon but maille is better than English. Made with crispy fried red onions. Saurkraut. Fried seeds ( mustard. Fennel, caraway ) Brioche toasted bun. Ketchup and dijon, with some cornichons also. Good hotdog.

    edit. Not actual hotdogs ( rough ) just a pork sausage.

  • edited May 1


    Kilkeel crab & cucumber salad for starter, Chateaubriand with fondant potato and creamed mushrooms for mains.

    PS I didn’t actually cook all this from scratch. It’s from my local restaurant who basically do all the prep, you just re-heat it and plate it up.

  • English asparagus season here so nothing else to eat despite the smell a surprisingly short time afterwards…

  • Wow Dave, the tomato sauce looks yummy. I find cooking and music kind of similar and both bring me lots of fun.

    My putanesca

    Love to cook jiaozi, the only thing is that it takes a lot of time to prepare and gets eaten instantly...

    Since I live in Japan, some Japanese home cooking:

  • @GeoTony said:
    English asparagus season here so nothing else to eat despite the smell a surprisingly short time afterwards…

    Yes had asparagus tonight, shallow fried in butter and rock salt (served alongside cullen skink and sourdough bread). The smell happened on my 1st pee afterwards!

    I can see this thread running and running because we're all middle aged men (proven!) and therefore food is very important to us :D

  • I've gotten into baking sourdough bread with a homegrown starter. The area I live is known for being very good for sourdough, and I have to say the taste is excellent. The family has been devouring it at a frightening rate.

    I'm still working on my bread making skills. Loaf quality has been mixed.



  • @wim My lady and I just watched a show about a guy in the Netherlands (I think) who had a sourdough starter library of like 400 sourdoughs. I had no idea about the history of it all - weirdly fascinating stuff!

  • @Daveypoo said:
    @wim My lady and I just watched a show about a guy in the Netherlands (I think) who had a sourdough starter library of like 400 sourdoughs. I had no idea about the history of it all - weirdly fascinating stuff!

    That's interesting. I would think that over time they would all gravitate toward tasting much the same. Sourdough ferments from the natural yeasts in the air, so it seems like flavor would be more dependent on the locale than anything else. Other than that, the only other influencers are the types of flour used.

    It is fun stuff to mess with. It's like having a living breathing thing in your kitchen. Like a pet or something.

  • @wim, any personal tips on growing a starter would be appreciated.
    Your bread looks so yummy !

  • wimwim
    edited May 2

    @JanKun said:
    @wim, any personal tips on growing a starter would be appreciated.
    Your bread looks so yummy !

    I don't have any major tips. There are zillions of descriptions of how to do it on the internet. They're all basically variations on the same idea: Combine equal amounts of flour and water in a jar, cover with something that can breath like a tea towel, paper towel, coffee filter and leave at room temperature. The next day take out half and replace the amount you took out with a 50/50 mixture of flour and water. After a few days you should start to see bubbles and that the starter expands. Keep going for at least a week until the starter is actively bubbling and roughly doubling in volume after each "feeding".

    After that you can keep it in the refrigerator in a sealed jar for up to a week between feedings. When you want to make something, take it out, find out how much you need for your recipe, then add half flour, half water to get that amount. It usually takes about six to eight hours for the starter to re-activate and double in size. If you don't want to make anything, you still need to feed the starter by removing half of it and adding that amount of the 50/50 mixture and letting it rise before returning to the fridge.

    I suggest joining Pinterest and just typing Sourdough into the search bar. You'll have all the info you could ever want. The rest is just experimenting and finding what works best for you.

    (P.S. I like my starter a little thicker than 50/50. I've been going more like 60% flour 40% water and it's working out better to me. But most recipes suggest just 50/50. I also use about 10% whole wheat and the rest unbleached flour. I like the mild added tang that the whole wheat seems to add.)

  • Thank you @wim !
    I will give it a try !

  • Will be roasting a chicken in a while, so giving some thought to what I should flavor it with

  • @wim Interesting. Just a week ago I've tried my first kefir bread, born out of the need to reduce the insane worldwide application of Bayer Roundup/glyphosate. My approach was a radical one: I wanted a recipe that doesn't take more than 5 minutes preparation (with a large cup of home made Kefir already available of course). Quite tasty I must say, doesn't remind me much of conventional bread but it fits both salty and sweet spreads. The only baking agents are kefir and sodium bicarbonate.
    My first one had too little kefir and bicarbonate but the second one rose quite well.

  • @rs2000 said:
    @wim Interesting. Just a week ago I've tried my first kefir bread, born out of the need to reduce the insane worldwide application of Bayer Roundup/glyphosate. My approach was a radical one: I wanted a recipe that doesn't take more than 5 minutes preparation (with a large cup of home made Kefir already available of course). Quite tasty I must say, doesn't remind me much of conventional bread but it fits both salty and sweet spreads. The only baking agents are kefir and sodium bicarbonate.
    My first one had too little kefir and bicarbonate but the second one rose quite well.

    No flour?

  • @ecou said:

    @rs2000 said:
    @wim Interesting. Just a week ago I've tried my first kefir bread, born out of the need to reduce the insane worldwide application of Bayer Roundup/glyphosate. My approach was a radical one: I wanted a recipe that doesn't take more than 5 minutes preparation (with a large cup of home made Kefir already available of course). Quite tasty I must say, doesn't remind me much of conventional bread but it fits both salty and sweet spreads. The only baking agents are kefir and sodium bicarbonate.
    My first one had too little kefir and bicarbonate but the second one rose quite well.

    No flour?

    Of course. Organic flour, kefir, bicarbonate, butter, salt.

  • @rs2000 said:

    @ecou said:

    @rs2000 said:
    @wim Interesting. Just a week ago I've tried my first kefir bread, born out of the need to reduce the insane worldwide application of Bayer Roundup/glyphosate. My approach was a radical one: I wanted a recipe that doesn't take more than 5 minutes preparation (with a large cup of home made Kefir already available of course). Quite tasty I must say, doesn't remind me much of conventional bread but it fits both salty and sweet spreads. The only baking agents are kefir and sodium bicarbonate.
    My first one had too little kefir and bicarbonate but the second one rose quite well.

    No flour?

    Of course. Organic flour, kefir, bicarbonate, butter, salt.

    Well I was wondering an a bit hopeful since I am gluten intolerant.

  • @ecou said:

    @rs2000 said:

    @ecou said:

    @rs2000 said:
    @wim Interesting. Just a week ago I've tried my first kefir bread, born out of the need to reduce the insane worldwide application of Bayer Roundup/glyphosate. My approach was a radical one: I wanted a recipe that doesn't take more than 5 minutes preparation (with a large cup of home made Kefir already available of course). Quite tasty I must say, doesn't remind me much of conventional bread but it fits both salty and sweet spreads. The only baking agents are kefir and sodium bicarbonate.
    My first one had too little kefir and bicarbonate but the second one rose quite well.

    No flour?

    Of course. Organic flour, kefir, bicarbonate, butter, salt.

    Well I was wondering an a bit hopeful since I am gluten intolerant.

    I don't know if I believe it or not, but several sources claim that sourdough bread mitigates gluten intolerance to some degree.

  • @wim said:

    @ecou said:

    @rs2000 said:

    @ecou said:

    @rs2000 said:
    @wim Interesting. Just a week ago I've tried my first kefir bread, born out of the need to reduce the insane worldwide application of Bayer Roundup/glyphosate. My approach was a radical one: I wanted a recipe that doesn't take more than 5 minutes preparation (with a large cup of home made Kefir already available of course). Quite tasty I must say, doesn't remind me much of conventional bread but it fits both salty and sweet spreads. The only baking agents are kefir and sodium bicarbonate.
    My first one had too little kefir and bicarbonate but the second one rose quite well.

    No flour?

    Of course. Organic flour, kefir, bicarbonate, butter, salt.

    Well I was wondering an a bit hopeful since I am gluten intolerant.

    I don't know if I believe it or not, but several sources claim that sourdough bread mitigates gluten intolerance to some degree.

    I also have read that. I am still experimenting what affects me. Might no be gluten at all but yeast. Lots of trial and error.

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