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Behringer BCR32 - BCR 2000 successor

edited January 14 in Off-topic

I think this will be my perfect controller! I love endless encoders! Price mentioned is $149. Picture is a mockup, production has not been announced. Miss my old BCR 2000!

"Wow, we're blown away by the amazing feedback - 3,500 likes in a single day:-)
Do you know that the original BCR2000 is actually 15 years old? The original designers Bert and Thomas are still with us and thrilled that their baby gets a second life.
Please find the BCR32 feature list and let us hear your comments:

USB/MIDI Controller/Sequencer with 32 Multi-Purpose Encoders and Polyphonic 32-Step / 4-Track Zaquencer

• Universal USB/MIDI controller for triggering audio clips, MIDI events or any MIDI equipment
• Highly-acclaimed Zaquencer from ZAQ Audio for unmatched sequencer performance
• Compatible with popular DAWs or other music production software
• 32 multi-purpose encoders for custom assignment of parameters
• 4 virtual groups and 8 dual-mode encoders with push function
• 20 programmable buttons, assignable as note on/off, control and program change, MMC and system exclusive data
• All panel elements are freely assignable, manually or via user-friendly learn mode
• 32-step, 4-track Zaquencer featuring mono/polyphonic drum and note tracks
• Storage of all global parameters and up to 192 patterns, each consisting of 4 tracks
• 2 independent MIDI controls per track (program change, aftertouch, pitch bend, CCs)
• 4 CV/Gate and Sync connectors for controlling synthesizers, drum machines and other equipment
• 2 assignable footswitch connectors for handsfree control
• Multi-function OLED display for easy control of all parameters
• High visibility multi-color LED feedback to show status of all controls
• 1 MIDI input and 2 MIDI output connectors to serve as additional USB to MIDI interface
• MIDI input with merge function for cascading several control units
• USB powered compact design for ultimate portability
• Compatible with Apple iPad* via USB Camera Adapter (not included)
• Class-compliant MIDI/USB protocol for "plug and play" operation
• 3-year extended warranty upon registration"

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10159066420493914&id=105517788913

Comments

  • Wow. The Zaquencer alone is €80.

  • Love this thing. Behringer rocks!

  • edited January 14

    I’ll be getting this. Just what I’ve been looking for.

  • Instabuy. I have Zaquencer but this will USB powered, plus you can use for midi as well.

  • @Frank303 said:
    I think this will be my perfect controller! I love endless encoders! Price mentioned is $149. Picture is a mockup, production has not been announced. Miss my old BCR 2000!

    "Wow, we're blown away by the amazing feedback - 3,500 likes in a single day:-)
    Do you know that the original BCR2000 is actually 15 years old? The original designers Bert and Thomas are still with us and thrilled that their baby gets a second life.
    Please find the BCR32 feature list and let us hear your comments:

    USB/MIDI Controller/Sequencer with 32 Multi-Purpose Encoders and Polyphonic 32-Step / 4-Track Zaquencer

    • Universal USB/MIDI controller for triggering audio clips, MIDI events or any MIDI equipment
    • Highly-acclaimed Zaquencer from ZAQ Audio for unmatched sequencer performance
    • Compatible with popular DAWs or other music production software
    • 32 multi-purpose encoders for custom assignment of parameters
    • 4 virtual groups and 8 dual-mode encoders with push function
    • 20 programmable buttons, assignable as note on/off, control and program change, MMC and system exclusive data
    • All panel elements are freely assignable, manually or via user-friendly learn mode
    • 32-step, 4-track Zaquencer featuring mono/polyphonic drum and note tracks
    • Storage of all global parameters and up to 192 patterns, each consisting of 4 tracks
    • 2 independent MIDI controls per track (program change, aftertouch, pitch bend, CCs)
    • 4 CV/Gate and Sync connectors for controlling synthesizers, drum machines and other equipment
    • 2 assignable footswitch connectors for handsfree control
    • Multi-function OLED display for easy control of all parameters
    • High visibility multi-color LED feedback to show status of all controls
    • 1 MIDI input and 2 MIDI output connectors to serve as additional USB to MIDI interface
    • MIDI input with merge function for cascading several control units
    • USB powered compact design for ultimate portability
    • Compatible with Apple iPad* via USB Camera Adapter (not included)
    • Class-compliant MIDI/USB protocol for "plug and play" operation
    • 3-year extended warranty upon registration"

    https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=10159066420493914&id=105517788913

    This is fabulous news! Why the hell I sold my BCR-2000 I'll never know. This will be a game changer for me. :)

  • I have never used endless encoders. Would developers need to update their apps to have it supported, or does it "just work"?

  • @auxmux said:
    Instabuy. I have Zaquencer but this will USB powered, plus you can use for midi as well.

    +CV too. Very generous with the 4 cv/gate pairs. Hope it could dispatch a polyphonic signal to the 4 different outputs.

  • @bleep said:
    I have never used endless encoders. Would developers need to update their apps to have it supported, or does it "just work"?

    It generally "just works". The rotary encoders show a Midi CC value between 0-127 to the software, the same as a regular knob on a midi controller, where that number is at controls where the knob in the software is at.

    The cool thing about encoders rather than knobs, is if the software is good, it can talk back to the controller and set the encoders to the current value of the knobs in the software, that way there isn't a jump in the knob position in the software the first time you touch the midi controller. Moog apps are awesome for this, I believe they even update the midi CC's when you change patches, so your endless encoders all update when you change patches, very slick.

    There is a less often used version of midi control from encoders, rather than acting like a knob that has a definite position, there's a version that the encoder just sends increment/decrement messages, without a specific knob position in mind, only that you're spinning the encoder clockwise or counter clockwise. This has the advantage of not jumping the knob position in software, it'ts always smooth and predictable, but you lose the lights on the encoder that show where it's at, the controller doesn't know anything. The best setup for visual feedback is the one like Moog used.

  • Such controller is definitely nice, but I am afraid it won't beat the quality of original BCR 2000, which Ben Jordan referred recently as "built like a f*ing tank" :smiley: I know people who bought it those 10-15 years ago and use it daily on stages for professional use (I know many people doing stage lightning using it) till today. That was a legendary line of controllers when it comes to durability and quality of build (probably the highest quality products Behringer ever made).
    Of course, sequencer looks interesting and we definitely need more controllers with endless LED encoders. I am still amazed how many software developers ignore sending state of MIDI mapped controls as a "snapshot" to such controllers. That alone allows for incredible flexibility of use - paging of parameters, locking controls to certain device / section of controls etc... It's a shame as this is really old technology and I'd expect these days MIDI 2.0 controllers that will be not only showing the parameter values, but also the name of parameter on small display above the encoder, even general stuff like preset name, BPM etc... Yes, there are custom solutions like Ableton Push, but still it's far away from standard. To me it seems like MIDI controllers industry isn't moving forward for last 10 years...

  • @Processaurus said:

    @bleep said:
    I have never used endless encoders. Would developers need to update their apps to have it supported, or does it "just work"?

    ...
    It generally "just works". The rotary encoders show a Midi CC value between 0-127 to the software, the same as a regular knob on a midi controller, where that number is at controls where the knob in the software is at.

    Hopefully not!!
    You don't want parameter jumps all the time after switching banks, do you?
    Luckily, apps like Drambo and Groove Rider already support incremental controls so you don't have to fall back to absolute CC values.
    The "next generation" of iOS apps will support parameter feedback to hardware, no matter if it's classic MIDI or MIDI 2.0.
    A word to app developers: Don't try to support all the controllers out there out of the box. Give users a mechanism to create mappings for parameter control and feedback for themselves. Joint work of forum members will produce such mappings sooner or later.
    (Check out https://github.com/mixxxdj/mixxx/tree/main/res/controllers for working examples.)

    The cool thing about encoders rather than knobs, is if the software is good, it can talk back to the controller and set the encoders to the current value of the knobs in the software, that way there isn't a jump in the knob position in the software the first time you touch the midi controller. Moog apps are awesome for this, I believe they even update the midi CC's when you change patches, so your endless encoders all update when you change patches, very slick.

    There is a less often used version of midi control from encoders, rather than acting like a knob that has a definite position, there's a version that the encoder just sends increment/decrement messages, without a specific knob position in mind, only that you're spinning the encoder clockwise or counter clockwise. This has the advantage of not jumping the knob position in software, it'ts always smooth and predictable, but you lose the lights on the encoder that show where it's at, the controller doesn't know anything. The best setup for visual feedback is the one like Moog used.

    Indeed, an endless encoder only sends increment or decrement messages, the actual value and value change is only known by the app under control.
    Parameter feedback to control led rings and bars is totally independent from that though, it's up to the app to update the displays on the hardware controller. In fact, LED rings make much more sense with endless encoders or pots.

  • edited January 14

    I'd feel less guilty buying a Behringered Behringer than a Behringered vintage synth.

    I'd definitely make of use of something like this. Especially if the mappings could be edited on the unit itself. The LEARN button makes me think it should be.

    Can the original BCR2000 be mapped without a computer?

  • It can be (going by the original). Thought for me the biggest benefit came from use of a third party editor. I hope it will be compatible/updated when bcr drops.

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