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Mic input issues ...differences between Cubasis 2 and BeatMaker 3?

Hi,
In Cubasis 2...l get blue metering gain showing with no vocals inputted..just background noise making signal...
But BeatMaker 3 no issues...clean signal....background noise has little influence...
Background noise being traffic on road 70 meters away..

Mic is Rode NT 1A
Audio interface is Zoom U-24.

Any ideas?
Thanks.

Comments

  • @IOSSOS said:
    Hi,
    In Cubasis 2...l get blue metering gain showing with no vocals inputted..just background noise making signal...
    But BeatMaker 3 no issues...clean signal....background noise has little influence...
    Background noise being traffic on road 70 meters away..

    Mic is Rode NT 1A
    Audio interface is Zoom U-24.

    Any ideas?
    Thanks.

    Could be some sort of automatic level compensation. Does the noise level drop when you add vocal? Just guessing...

  • edited November 21

    There is always „background noise“, even without any sound present at all.
    In the NT1a the circuit generates some (in a dynamic mic it would be the coil resistance).
    Next in chain is the preamp stage and (less) the converter chip.
    This applies to any mic, preamp, converter.

    The noise level itself doesn‘t matter, but it‘s difference to the signal, called SNR (signal to noise ratio).
    It‘s a bit tricky to judge by specs because (almost) all manufacturers want to present great figures and it‘s easy to cheat with dB because it’s a relative scale and does not show absolute values. You have to consider the base to which the noise level is compared.

    Example: if you whisper into a mic there will be more noise noticeable than if you’re shouting at it. The maker of an interface/preamp will use the full throat shouting level as the measuring base, because the preamp then can be set to much lower gain (equal to less amp noise) ;)

    Software varies at which point the meter gets engaged: some display any value, but some start acting only if a certain level is exceeded, often -60dB.
    The noise is always present, unless it‘s gated at input/conversion stage (which some devices may do by muting the channel below (for example) -70dB).

  • Expert answers...thanks..
    Will listen to recordings to hear if any background hiss..
    Probably better recording vocals night time!

  • edited November 21

    Sorry forgot to mention (the obvious):
    there may be a number somewhere in the Cubase meter telling the momentary level.
    This may (the NT1a has very low self noise) read -76dB or -82 or similiar and depends on the gain setting of the Zoom.
    The more gain applied, the higher this number will go.

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