Audiobus: Use your music apps together.

What is Audiobus?Audiobus is an award-winning music app for iPhone and iPad which lets you use your other music apps together. Chain effects on your favourite synth, run the output of apps or Audio Units into an app like GarageBand or Loopy, or select a different audio interface output for each app. Route MIDI between apps — drive a synth from a MIDI sequencer, or add an arpeggiator to your MIDI keyboard — or sync with your external MIDI gear. And control your entire setup from a MIDI controller.

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Audiobus is the app that makes the rest of your setup better.

Anyone interested in a Melodyne-style iOS app?

Hi guys, I’m Daniel Kuntz, founder of Coda Labs (codalabs.io). You might know me as the developer of L7 and AudioTune.

I’ve been thinking about a more “pro” version of AudioTune, and something that comes up repeatedly in my discussions with users is Melodyne. I’m trying to gauge interest for a Melodyne-style app on iOS and understand what features are important to iOS musicians. This forum seems like a great place to start a discussion.

There is one limitation that I am not sure how to overcome, and that is polyphonic detection and manipulation. Melodyne calls this Direct Note Access (DNA). I am incredibly interested in finding out how the DSP works, but I can't promise I'll be able to replicate almost a decade of PhD research in any reasonable amount of time.

So for now, please assume this is a monophonic pitch correction tool that allows you to edit individual notes and pitch contours in a graph-style UI.

My main questions:

  • Are you interested? Why or why not?
  • How much would you pay for an app like this?
  • What features are “must-haves”? Meaning if the app doesn’t have this feature, you wouldn’t download it.
  • What would be an ultimate “killer” feature? Even if it defies the laws of physics. Think outside of the box :)
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Comments

  • edited June 8

    Very interested... Liquid Instruments was way ahead

  • I think most people will answer VERY interested. My guess is anywhere from $10-$30 would be supported here.

  • YES, yes and yes. All of the Melodyne - type features and everything else you can throw in there. DeEsser, Formant dialing in, touch screen individual part of a recorded wav file and plug in the correct note, etc...
    I would pay $20 for THEE AutoTuner that could handle the rampant out of tune singing that occurs all over my ipad&iphone.
    Ps:Make one that works on both devices please.

  • edited June 8

    yes, very interested — and ready to fork €20 to €30 for a working clone of Melodyne…

  • Would also be very interested and would pay high prices, because imo that's the only thing that I really miss on ios to do pro productions.

  • @danielfromcodalabs said:
    Hi guys, I’m Daniel Kuntz, founder of Coda Labs (codalabs.io). You might know me as the developer of L7 and AudioTune.

    I’ve been thinking about a more “pro” version of AudioTune, and something that comes up repeatedly in my discussions with users is Melodyne. I’m trying to gauge interest for a Melodyne-style app on iOS and understand what features are important to iOS musicians. This forum seems like a great place to start a discussion.

    There is one limitation that I am not sure how to overcome, and that is polyphonic detection and manipulation. Melodyne calls this Direct Note Access (DNA). I am incredibly interested in finding out how the DSP works, but I can't promise I'll be able to replicate almost a decade of PhD research in any reasonable amount of time.

    So for now, please assume this is a monophonic pitch correction tool that allows you to edit individual notes and pitch contours in a graph-style UI.

    My main questions:

    • Are you interested? Why or why not?
    • How much would you pay for an app like this?
    • What features are “must-haves”?
    • What would be an ultimate “killer” feature? Even if it defies the laws of physics. Think outside of the box :)

    It would be worth it.
    It would complete the essential tools for audio production on iOS.

  • I would definitely buy it. As for the price, that would depend on how it compares to Melodyne, or how useful it is as its own thing.

  • edited June 8

    I’d be very interested, but £10 is pretty much my limit for all but a very few apps. This could be one of those apps if it definitely did all the things... Monophonic is fine, poly obviously better (!) For me, being able to automagically re-pitch a sample phrase to a preselected scale would be very cool, ( my main issue is creating a free form audio loop I like using FX, field recordings, whatever, but then lacking the musical chops to know what chords and scales the thing can sit with, which makes it hard for me to develop a suitable midi setting for the audio.to build out from the initial loop. ) and if it also offered rhythmic editing as per the vid example above, even better

  • This is a very important niche to fill, and I'm surprised it hasn't been yet.

    I wouldn't worry too much about DNA style editing. Even just classic monophonic would be great.

    I agree with Gravitas this is basically the ONE piece of the desktop software puzzle I miss on iOS.

  • Perhaps some smaller hanging fruit would be using some of your existing code to create a monophonic audio to MIDI AUv3 effect app with scales support, including the import of scala files? Such an app could use controls for volume thresholds and how long notes are sustained and/or quantization options to generate MIDI streams.

    It does seem like polyphonic pitch correction could be a much higher mountain to climb.

  • One important caveat is that Melodyne is usually an offline process in a separate app. So no need to make this Auv3 IMO.

    On the desktop I've used both Melodyne and Revoice Pro, and I prefer Revoice Pro. It has some features that Melodyne doesn't have, such as the ability to line up double-tracks and also edit the energy of the sounds (so you can level things out). It also automatically detects non-pitched sounds such as "S" sounds and allows you to edit their level but doesn't try to pitch them.

    I don't think polyphonic features are important at all, and I don't think many people use those features in Melodyne. The important thing is the ability to correct pitch without leaving too many artifacts.

    Important features for me:

    Ability to control the level of pitch correction, from slight to strong, using a slider
    Ability to smooth join separate notes so that there aren't sudden jumps in pitch (which is the tell-tale sign of pitch correction)
    Ability to control where the notes are split
    Ability to selectively revert some notes back to their original state
    Ability to optionally map the notes to a scale or a selection of scales.

  • I need a melodyne AUv3 app. Absolutely. The reason is mainly for voice post recording correction. I would assume that a monophonic version would be sufficient in most cases (but of course a polyphonic would be better). For the price : if it works really very well, then I can easily spend 30$. But it has to be comparable to melodyne.

  • Absolutely, I’d spend $30 for that

  • @richardyot said:
    One important caveat is that Melodyne is usually an offline process in a separate app. So no need to make this Auv3 IMO.

    On the desktop I've used both Melodyne and Revoice Pro, and I prefer Revoice Pro. It has some features that Melodyne doesn't have, such as the ability to line up double-tracks and also edit the energy of the sounds (so you can level things out). It also automatically detects non-pitched sounds such as "S" sounds and allows you to edit their level but doesn't try to pitch them.

    I don't think polyphonic features are important at all, and I don't think many people use those features in Melodyne. The important thing is the ability to correct pitch without leaving too many artifacts.

    Important features for me:

    Ability to control the level of pitch correction, from slight to strong, using a slider
    Ability to smooth join separate notes so that there aren't sudden jumps in pitch (which is the tell-tale sign of pitch correction)
    Ability to control where the notes are split
    Ability to selectively revert some notes back to their original state
    Ability to optionally map the notes to a scale or a selection of scales.

    Very helpful, thank you. How much would you pay for something that has all the features you listed?

  • Yes, definitely interested.

    For an idea about cost check out what Fab Filter is charging for hi-end audio processing apps in iOS.

  • I use Melodyne Editor from it‘s start, now I‘m on 4. Only because of this thread I know there‘s 5 now and, oh boy I have to upgrade again, it has a Chord Track! This alone would be a killer feature...

    The ultimate killer feature would be a realtime-correction based on a given chord track... imagine that for Audiotune... no more funny live-soloing-fail-videos... oh no, don‘t do that!!!

  • Yes.
    Your autotune
    Plus the melodyne,
    Would Help complete iOS music setup.
    So basically no need of moving projects to pc.
    One could produce, record vocals and make fine tuning adjustments all on the ipad.
    In regards to price, like someone mentioned above, the FabFilter pricing could be an option.

  • I'm definitely interested. Especially if it includes the features @richardyot mentioned as well as Files support/Audioshare support for easy in, easy out transferring of wavs. Also a way to select all of the pitch areas and center them to one pitch just in case I want to create a new melody.

    I personally would pay $30-$50 for the monophonic version (the base version), and a $10-$20 IAP for an optional polyphonic upgrade. (I figured if Fabfilter can sell their plugins for a high price, so can you.) This way we can get our hands on the monophonic version sooner and then upgrade to the polyphonic version if need be. :)

    I would also hope it'd be universal somehow (although, again, to get our hands on the monophonic version sooner rather than later, you can make it iPad only to start with and add universal support later).

    What I currently do to tune my vocals is use Multitrack Studio's vocal tuner plugin, and it functions by drawing in the pitch range of where you want the vocal tuned. I use the apple pencil to draw in the ranges since using my finger is too cumbersome, even on my 12.9" iPad Pro. So, your app should be finger-friendly. My other complaint about the MTS method is the fact that the correction is either not enough or is too much (i.e. Cher/T-Pain/Eiffel 65) and isn't natural-sounding enough.

    I'm absolutely grateful you've decided to try creating a Melodyne clone. I'm glad one of the developers finally took interest enough to do so. It's about time. :) Thanks mate.

  • edited June 8

    Unquestionably, unequivocally, yes! I would buy it in a heartbeat.

  • edited June 8

    @richardyot said:
    One important caveat is that Melodyne is usually an offline process in a separate app. So no need to make this Auv3 IMO.

    If I was buying an Auv3 melodyne style plug-in I would assume it would work as an instrument plug in, into which you would load audio tracks. A bit like the 4pockwts multitrack app thing. (or fx plug which could capture audio from the host audio track)

    You would then be able adjust the pitch in context with your other tracks within the daw.

    I wouldn’t want to take this out of the host personally. The standalone app would obviously be there as an alternative to using it within a host.

  • Personally I probably wouldn't find it that useful, as I do a lot of my audio manipulation on my MacBook and then send it to my iPad. It might be useful from time to time, so buying it might be dependent on price. Maybe something like $20 would be tempting.

  • @danielfromcodalabs : Dang Is’d sure be interested if you could figure out the polyphonic detection somehow. Maybe in time?

  • @danielfromcodalabs said:

    @richardyot said:
    One important caveat is that Melodyne is usually an offline process in a separate app. So no need to make this Auv3 IMO.

    On the desktop I've used both Melodyne and Revoice Pro, and I prefer Revoice Pro. It has some features that Melodyne doesn't have, such as the ability to line up double-tracks and also edit the energy of the sounds (so you can level things out). It also automatically detects non-pitched sounds such as "S" sounds and allows you to edit their level but doesn't try to pitch them.

    I don't think polyphonic features are important at all, and I don't think many people use those features in Melodyne. The important thing is the ability to correct pitch without leaving too many artifacts.

    Important features for me:

    Ability to control the level of pitch correction, from slight to strong, using a slider
    Ability to smooth join separate notes so that there aren't sudden jumps in pitch (which is the tell-tale sign of pitch correction)
    Ability to control where the notes are split
    Ability to selectively revert some notes back to their original state
    Ability to optionally map the notes to a scale or a selection of scales.

    Very helpful, thank you. How much would you pay for something that has all the features you listed?

    Well I personally would pay up to £50 for that, but this is iOS so high prices do tend to cause some gnashing of teeth. On the desktop the equivalent tool (base version of Melodyne) is £99.

  • Definitely interested, I’d want to use it for applying my own melodies to existing vocal phrase samples.

  • Formant modification is a must-have for me.

  • Absolutely @danielfromcodalabs Since FabFilter introduced their suite of apps as AUv3's & companies like DDMF, Audio Damage & ToneBoosters have the last remaining iOS Music Production app category to have a huge void is a professional vocal tuning app ala' Melodyne or AutoTune.

    While stereo polyphonic tuning is neat and an impressive feature, it's just not what a tuning plugin is used for 85% of the time in a pro DAW in my opinion. Unless you're going for the robotic TPain/Cher sound, auto tuning is best used subtly to repair a few errant notes in performances that were so good you don't want to lose.
    Plus foregoing features that are rarely used can allow all of the apps attention & power to be focused on the mono tuning.

    My vote would also be towards a post production interface rather than a live tuning facility, meaning once a vocal track is done it can be run through the tuner or imported into it and then a graphical piano roll representation of the notes of the vocal could then be changed along the piano roll.

    Long story short: YES, we want a vocal/monophonic instrument tuner!

  • Yes, I would definitely buy it, been holding off on buying it on desktop.

  • $20, sure. More? Nope, I'm a hobbyist playing music for myself and don't really need it that badly.

  • @richardyot said:
    Ability to control the level of pitch correction, from slight to strong, using a slider
    Ability to smooth join separate notes so that there aren't sudden jumps in pitch (which is the tell-tale sign of pitch correction)
    Ability to control where the notes are split
    Ability to selectively revert some notes back to their original state
    Ability to optionally map the notes to a scale or a selection of scales.

    Very much these.
    And most important, the quality of the algorithm:

    @richardyot said:
    the ability to correct pitch without leaving too many artifacts.

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