Audiobus: Use your music apps together.

What is Audiobus?Audiobus is an award-winning music app for iPhone and iPad which lets you use your other music apps together. Chain effects on your favourite synth, run the output of apps or Audio Units into an app like GarageBand or Loopy, or select a different audio interface output for each app. Route MIDI between apps — drive a synth from a MIDI sequencer, or add an arpeggiator to your MIDI keyboard — or sync with your external MIDI gear. And control your entire setup from a MIDI controller.

Download on the App Store

Audiobus is the app that makes the rest of your setup better.

/OT/ EQ Tips w// Ken “Hiwatt” Marshall [Skinny Puppy engineer]

Ken has an abundance of energy and knowledge. I recommend watching all of his vids for tips and engineering secrets. Truly a legend.

Comments

  • edited May 19

    Wonder if the 6144 is the closest Eq to what he’s using in the iOS world

    https://apps.apple.com/us/app/6144-equalizer-by-ddmf/id1127457881

    Edit: looks like Blue Mangoo has a Parametric EQ

    https://apps.apple.com/us/app/parametric-equalizer/id1403326201

  • This is one of the most common techniques in EQing, it has nothing to do with the type of EQ or Make, you certainly do not need an API emulation.
    First you take any Parametric EQ, add a node, boost it as much as possible, move it around to find the frequency that is annoying you, back it down to zero, widen the Q and cut a few db.
    Do the reverse for finding what you want to boost.

  • I don’t think there is a parametric EQ with proportional Q on iOS yet.

  • edited May 21

    cool watch thnx @iOSTRAKON
    ha!

  • @Turntablist said:
    This is one of the most common techniques in EQing, it has nothing to do with the type of EQ or Make, you certainly do not need an API emulation.
    First you take any Parametric EQ, add a node, boost it as much as possible, move it around to find the frequency that is annoying you, back it down to zero, widen the Q and cut a few db.
    Do the reverse for finding what you want to boost.

    I've never been able to get the results I want that way, though it's a technique I know works for a lot of people. I always have to sweep while cutting to find the freqs I want to reduce, my ears just want me to do what I'm trying to do as soon as possible :)

  • @Tarekith said:

    @Turntablist said:
    This is one of the most common techniques in EQing, it has nothing to do with the type of EQ or Make, you certainly do not need an API emulation.
    First you take any Parametric EQ, add a node, boost it as much as possible, move it around to find the frequency that is annoying you, back it down to zero, widen the Q and cut a few db.
    Do the reverse for finding what you want to boost.

    I've never been able to get the results I want that way, though it's a technique I know works for a lot of people. I always have to sweep while cutting to find the freqs I want to reduce, my ears just want me to do what I'm trying to do as soon as possible :)

    I watched a YT vid where Matthew Weiss advised to never use the frequency boost method. Even though it is such accepted practice. I can’t find it now but his point was that sound are different when so. accentuated and you really need to be listening for frequency issues more ‘in the mix’. More natural. Or something. Have not done this justice! Will try to find that vid.

  • Cool vid though @iOSTRAKON ! I could watch these all day.

  • Definitely / I’ve watched each vid he has posted

    @gusgranite said:
    Cool vid though @iOSTRAKON ! I could watch these all day.

  • @gusgranite said:

    @Tarekith said:

    @Turntablist said:
    This is one of the most common techniques in EQing, it has nothing to do with the type of EQ or Make, you certainly do not need an API emulation.
    First you take any Parametric EQ, add a node, boost it as much as possible, move it around to find the frequency that is annoying you, back it down to zero, widen the Q and cut a few db.
    Do the reverse for finding what you want to boost.

    I've never been able to get the results I want that way, though it's a technique I know works for a lot of people. I always have to sweep while cutting to find the freqs I want to reduce, my ears just want me to do what I'm trying to do as soon as possible :)

    I watched a YT vid where Matthew Weiss advised to never use the frequency boost method. Even though it is such accepted practice. I can’t find it now but his point was that sound are different when so. accentuated and you really need to be listening for frequency issues more ‘in the mix’. More natural. Or something. Have not done this justice! Will try to find that vid.

    That doesn't make a huge amount of sense, it would make sense if you were just looking at the analyser, but if you are just scanning for resonant frequencies and listening, any that you are looking for will jump out at you, unless he was talking mastering, then you wouldn't really want to use that technique.

  • @Turntablist said:

    @gusgranite said:

    @Tarekith said:

    @Turntablist said:
    This is one of the most common techniques in EQing, it has nothing to do with the type of EQ or Make, you certainly do not need an API emulation.
    First you take any Parametric EQ, add a node, boost it as much as possible, move it around to find the frequency that is annoying you, back it down to zero, widen the Q and cut a few db.
    Do the reverse for finding what you want to boost.

    I've never been able to get the results I want that way, though it's a technique I know works for a lot of people. I always have to sweep while cutting to find the freqs I want to reduce, my ears just want me to do what I'm trying to do as soon as possible :)

    I watched a YT vid where Matthew Weiss advised to never use the frequency boost method. Even though it is such accepted practice. I can’t find it now but his point was that sound are different when so. accentuated and you really need to be listening for frequency issues more ‘in the mix’. More natural. Or something. Have not done this justice! Will try to find that vid.

    That doesn't make a huge amount of sense, it would make sense if you were just looking at the analyser, but if you are just scanning for resonant frequencies and listening, any that you are looking for will jump out at you, unless he was talking mastering, then you wouldn't really want to use that technique.

    I think it was similar to this approach https://modernmixing.com/blog/2013/02/15/dont-boost-and-sweep-subtractive-eq/

  • Dude is so excited to go back through the old mixes...... picked up a few cool tips!!!

  • edited May 26

    I don't know, maybe these tips work better if you have vocals and guitars and stuff ...
    my stuff is all synthesized, it just doesn't work for me like this
    I usualy dont have annoying frequencies or noises I want to hide or any of that and if I have that I have the big synthesis hammer to make something pleasant and dont need to fix it with eq
    most of the time im just boosting what I want to hear with eq
    meh

  • @Max23 said:
    I don't know, maybe these tips work better if you have vocals and guitars and stuff ...
    my stuff is all synthesized, it just doesn't work for me like this

    Probably needs some complex spectra content which makes me think of Scythe Synth for a sound source.
    Anything based on complex physical input like a overdriven guitar or a complex wavetable synthesis approach. Any good sampled content?

    Are you using the EQ550 app to test the approach?

    Is the EQ550 the only FX app with Proportional EQ implemented? When I change the Q in Pro-Q3 or Paramtric EQ is that similar to a "proportional"... the slope of the EQ curve narrows around the tent pole?
    Isn't that what he describes? Like a scalper you can remove a bad note this way, with a high Q.

    I wonh a be-uh 'igh Q, mate.

  • edited May 26

    @McD said:

    @Max23 said:
    I don't know, maybe these tips work better if you have vocals and guitars and stuff ...
    my stuff is all synthesized, it just doesn't work for me like this

    Probably needs some complex spectra content which makes me think of Scythe Synth for a sound source.
    Anything based on complex physical input like a overdriven guitar or a complex wavetable synthesis approach. Any good sampled content?

    Are you using the EQ550 app to test the approach?

    Is the EQ550 the only FX app with Proportional EQ implemented? When I change the Q in Pro-Q3 or Paramtric EQ is that similar to a "proportional"... the slope of the EQ curve narrows around the tent pole?
    Isn't that what he describes? Like a scalper you can remove a bad note this way, with a high Q.

    I wonh a be-uh 'igh Q, mate.

    I use whatever parametrics, the proportional thing just means the more u cut or boost the narrower the bands gets, nothing a parametric can't do ...

    thinking about it I guess Im using eq mostly more creative to add additional resonances instead of removing something, ( well obviously I dont want a bassy HH or something)
    but if I really have some annoying frequency in a complex sound I would use a notchfilter set to follow pitch, so what is cut out moves with the notes played - an eq simply cant do that

  • EQ550, EQ550b and the graphic EQ560.

    You can test them all for free.

  • Another good one from Hiwatt

  • The next EQ session

  • Damn it. Didn't need another channel subscription!

    :) <3

  • This is a must have ;)

    @vitocorleone123 said:
    Damn it. Didn't need another channel subscription!

    :) <3

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