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How do I remove Slide Over App?

I have L7 and ChordPolyPad in slide over mode but I can’t figure out how to remove them. I know how to close them by sliding them out but they’re still in the background taking up resources. Thanks!

Comments

  • Slide up on the 'bar' under the slide over window, after that swipe up to close the apps just like swiping up to close regular apps.

  • The same way you close any app running in the background. Double-tap the home button (or whatever the equivalent if there is no home button) and swipe up on any running apps.

    If ChordPolyPad doesn't show up as running, then I'm pretty sure it isn't taking up any resources. Do a memory reset (good thing to do always whenever you've used any IAA/Standalone app) if you want to be double sure.

  • None show up as running when i swipe up but if I slide over in AUM they’re there still.

  • @Tones4Christ said:
    None show up as running when i swipe up but if I slide over in AUM they’re there still.

    Slide over will remember the last app that was slid over sometimes even if it isn't currently running or using any resources and restore it.

  • When you slide over it will reload the last used app. Doesn’t mean it was running all the time.

    Also iOS aggressively shuts down apps in the background. There’s no need to quit anything other than apps that have background audio enabled. Apps like chordpolyapp are just midi. Not worth worrying about with respect to resources.

    Quitting apps is often used more resources as reloading the app takes more cycles than awakening a sleeping app.

    So yeah. Unless it’s an audio app with background mode turned on, or a troublesome app in some other respect there’s no need to quit anything. In fact it’s best not to.

  • Awesome! Thank you all😀

  • wimwim
    edited March 6

    I totally disagree with the above post from @klownshed. There are out-standing long-time issues with IAA apps not releasing resources. I’m not going to go dig up posts because I don’t care enough to argue the point. However, I know for sure based on real evidence, having investigated my own iPad carefully, that crap gets left behind. I’m also (subjectively) convinced that I suffer far fewer problems than I seem to see others experiencing with audio apps, which I directly attribute to my instinctive habit of clearing memory after every music session.

    I can also remember at least a dozen instance of finding a dead battery in the morning, even though I had force quitted each running app. When investigating, I found MIDI connectors still open even though the apps had been quit.

    Not trying to start an argument, and won’t refute if you don’t believe me, but just offering an opposing point of view which I’m pretty sure is accurate.

  • wimwim
    edited March 6

    Come to think of it ... @klownshed , you are one of the people I think who I’ve seen that seem to have issues hard for others to reproduce with NS2 (and maybe BM3? I forget). Or maybe I’m confused as usual.

    I’m not being aggressive here, but objectively I have to wonder if maybe thinking differently about trusting Apple’s ability, and trying clearing apps and resetting memory regularly for awhile might help. Maybe you already have though. I won’t assume.

    -cheers and peace. I mean no harm. :#

  • @wim said:
    I totally disagree with the above post from @klownshed. There are out-standing long-time issues with IAA apps not releasing resources. I’m not going to go dig up posts because I don’t care enough to argue the point. However, I know without a shadow of a doubt based on real evidence, having investigated my own iPad carefully, that crap gets left behind. I’m also (subjectively) convinced that I suffer far fewer problems than I seem to see others experiencing with audio apps, which I directly attribute to my instinctive habit of clearing memory after every music session.

    I can also remember at least a dozen instance of finding a dead battery in the morning, even though I had force quitted each running app. When investigating, I found MIDI connectors still open even though the apps had been quit.

    Not trying to start an argument, and won’t refute if you don’t believe me, but just offering an opposing point of view which I’m pretty sure is accurate.

    @wim and @klownshed are both right (kinda). It is true that GENERALLY the OS manages processes and resources and doesn't let processes use resources when they haven't been active for a few minutes and will eventually purge them from memory. HOWEVER, while that is generally true, as wim says, with IAA apps all bets are off. The OS lets audio apps keep running in the background (usually a good thing, you don't want your synth running in the background to get tossed while you are waiting to step in and play your lead) and can let them take up resources when they shouldn't. So, with audio apps, you kinda have to periodically manage them and toss them when you know that you are done with them.

    Zombies are real

  • That’s why i wish ChordPolyPad pad was AU. But I’m going to use TonalityAU instead, what an awesome app too!

  • IAA apps use background audio to run. So they need to be quit manually.

  • edited March 6

    .

  • @wim said:
    The same way you close any app running in the background. Double-tap the home button (or whatever the equivalent if there is no home button) and swipe up on any running apps.

    If ChordPolyPad doesn't show up as running, then I'm pretty sure it isn't taking up any resources. Do a memory reset (good thing to do always whenever you've used any IAA/Standalone app) if you want to be double sure.

    Slide Over apps actually don't show up in the normal pool of apps - this is even if they are active (e.g. AudioShare in Slide Over playing audio)

    As @Samu mentioned, you have to slide up from the bottom bar in the Slide Over app to see the pool of open Slide Over apps to be able to close one

    I would like to take this opportunity to rant about how awkward Apple have made opening apps in Silde Over that aren't in your Dock in iOS 13.

    In iOS 12 it was still a bit awkward, but more manageable:
    1. go to the home screen and find the app you want to open in Slide Over
    2. tap and drag (as if rearranging your Home Screen)
    3. tap the main app that you want to be under the Slide Over app to open it
    4. then move your dragging finger a bit to see the icon change to the Slide Over and release

    Awkward, somewhat complex, but when you're used it it's actually a pretty fluid set of actions.
    It also meant that you could open a Slide Over app over an app that wasn't currently running, since you would be opening that main app in step 3.

    With iOS 13 if you get to step 3 and tap the main app to open, what actually happens is that you are now "holding" both icons to rearrange your screen.

    So with iOS 13 the process is:
    1. make sure your main app is open and running.
    2. go to the home screen and find the app you want to open in Slide Over
    3. tap and drag (as if rearranging your Home Screen)
    4. swipe up from the bottom of the screen to get the task switcher
    5. find the main app and drag the Slide Over app on top of it
    6. then move your dragging finger a bit to see the icon change to the Slide Over and release

    Swiping up is always an awkward gesture, especially if you you're trying to do this one handed. It typically takes a couple of attempts to get right.

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