Audiobus: Use your music apps together.

What is Audiobus?Audiobus is an award-winning music app for iPhone and iPad which lets you use your other music apps together. Chain effects on your favourite synth, run the output of apps or Audio Units into an app like GarageBand or Loopy, or select a different audio interface output for each app. Route MIDI between apps — drive a synth from a MIDI sequencer, or add an arpeggiator to your MIDI keyboard — or sync with your external MIDI gear. And control your entire setup from a MIDI controller.

Download on the App Store

Audiobus is the app that makes the rest of your setup better.

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Comments

  • Is that… you?

  • You get the weirdest tweets when a cat walks over your keyboard.

  • Synthesisers and electronic music. I can’t decide where they fit in history. I suspect they are part of an obsolete part of history, one that isn’t here any more. I suspect they’re part of the hippie movement. They’re not part of the Victorian era, although perhaps should be. They’re not part of the punk nihilism and destruction. I think they’re basically the television age, which is over now.

  • That begs the questions:

    What ISN'T obsolete, besides things that don’t often exist yet?

    Do you find “everything” unpalatable?
    (Sometimes I do)

  • wimwim
    edited February 20

    @brambos said:
    You get the weirdest tweets when a cat walks over your keyboard.

    It's true though. Thank God I still have my Kazoo.

  • I think the whole electronic music thing has stalled. It had a heyday just prior to MIDI, had a good few years of revival (808; 303; 101 – early House music), and frankly just lives on further revivals now.

  • Even the output – the song, or tune, is obsolete. Maybe songs, albums, single tracks, are remnants of the days of a recorded music heyday. You all know I despise ‘jams’ and ‘noodling’ but that’s probably more a legitimate product than writing and releasing songs now.

  • As for drums and percussion~! How can anyone say it is not the most obsolete part of electronic music. On one hand, samples of any drum that has ever existed. On the other, actual artificial constructed synthesis of drum sounds. As long as it’s an 808.

  • Awww, you're just sore because you can't sell your ARP. :p

  • The synthesis methods and architectures. The usual normalised or patchable 1, 2 VCO subtractive architectures, thousands of those this year alone. I think we can safely say that synthesis architecture peaked before this century. No shortage of echoes of 303 like boxes, but that’s not peak subtractive, that’s just some folklore that became a cargo cult.

    Wave sequencing, wavetabling, granular shredding, none of it bringing a new dawn, mostly just reminding of days gone. Additive synthesis still not adding up to a game changer. FM still not the thing that compels everyone. It’s all dead-end.

  • edited February 20

    @kinkujin said:
    Awww, you're just sore because you can't sell your ARP. :p

    I can, I’m arranging something even now! Can’t spill the beans on that yet.

    The Roland SH-09 and CSQ-600 too. Probably all three Oberheim Matrix 1000s (when I put the new 1.20 EPROMs in, I have lying around here)

    I am not only glad to get shot of all my analogue gear, I’m seeing it as moving forward. Those days are gone, and should have gone long ago. There’s new forms to gravitate to. Or at least, there should be. I expect there to be.

  • edited February 20

    @u0421793 said:
    I am not only glad to get shot of all my analogue gear, I’m seeing it as moving forward. Those days are gone, and should have gone long ago. There’s new forms to gravitate to. Or at least, there should be. I expect there to be.

    Which new forms? In the absence of any really new instruments in the last 70 years, surely all music is now obsolete to you, or is it just synthesizers and music created with them?

    edit - my original comment said 100 years, but I amended that ;)

  • Everything is obsolete. Always been. Never was.

  • edited February 20

    The Beatles could have said the same about guitars in 1962.

    It’s not the instrument that plays the tune (aside from self-generating apps and sequencers), it’s the person twiddling the knobs.

    Personally I’m more excited about synths and electronic music now, than I was in 1979 when I took my brand new MS20 home on the bus.

  • I understand the Solomon moment, i have them myself sometimes. Useless, useless, everything is chasing after the wind. There is nothing new under the sun.

    But, there is. How many times have you stumbled upon a new synth, or a new plugin, or a new piece of hardware, and you are moved to create something that is totally fresh, totally new, to you?

    I'm ready for these moments. Maybe you've just not had one in awhile? Anyhow, good luck with the sales Ian K.

  • I always will be motivated by FM synthesis, I understand it well, and I appreciate the potential. There’s surprisingly few new FM instruments though. If I were to place a bet on it back in the previous century as to what the landscape would be like in 2020, I’d have lost.

    I really wouldn’t have been prepared for the insane and senseless survival of the 303 type, let alone nearly identical clones of it down to the irksome sequencer interface.

  • What I’m getting at, though, is that these things are a product of a culture, which is a product of an age.

    Remember when I mentioned in another thread about the lead instrument prior to rock and roll being a trumpet? It got me thinking that the 20th century 1930s-1950s dance band with trumpets, drums, etc was a product of the end of modernism, the guitar band was the start of post modernism, electronic music was also around that cusp too, but not initially as mainstream.

    In the early 70s you could see that Kraftwerk were tearing themselves away from the hippie (rejection of collapse of modernism) days they were growing up in, into something less reactionary but not yet congruent as a movement. I think by now we’re seeing what that movement is, and I hate to say it but I regard the signpost of modern music and the direction we go in as

    Beyoncé

  • This isn’t actually it, this is the predecessor, the prototype, the parent, but this contains what the next music will have or be the essence of:

    ‪Beyoncé - Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It) (Video Version)

  • Music for me is about getting away from other people. Synths/computers etc are about getting away from other musicians and culture.

  • But, the Beyoncé work mentioned above is still quite traditional and old-school in many ways. Verse, chorus, bridge. Release through record industry. Videos. All dead. Still alive, but all dead.

  • Oh and don’t get me started on Eurorack.

    Eurowank, more like!

  • Don't get me started on tweets and clickbait!

  • Maybe if we all change to 432 hz tuning?

  • @u0421793 said:
    But, the Beyoncé work mentioned above is still quite traditional and old-school in many ways. Verse, chorus, bridge. Release through record industry. Videos. All dead. Still alive, but all dead.

  • edited February 20

    For what it is worth (not much) I think as a person with ‘beginners mind’ where making music is concerned that, although they are currently used primarily for cookie cutter EDM, new control/performance paradigms like the grid instrument (Push, Launchpad, Deluge et al) and, yes, the interactive touch surface of an IPad or similar are signs of something wonderful struggling into being. Married to multiwarpable synth/sample/effected signal paths these devices are yet capable of extending the forms of music and sound in ways that will result in new virtuosos emerging and musics yet unheard of coming into being.

    The range and uniqueness of apps now available for this relatively cheap little gadget, the iPad, and what marvellous noises they make, and make possible, is beyond all dreams of what could have been accomplished with the all the hardware of electronic music’s first age.

    My own first interest fifty or more years ago was in the electro acoustic noises of Ircam and in some ways when I see someone like Hainbach (https://www.hainbachmusik.com/ ) repurposing vintage electronic nuclear test equipment and tape loops married to weird devices like the Ciat Lonbarde stuff, or the Koma electro acoustic kit, it feels like a first cycle already moving into the next phase. This, for me anyway, is a time of excitement and promise.

  • @MonzoPro said:
    The Beatles could have said the same about guitars in 1962.

    It’s not the instrument that plays the tune (aside from self-generating apps and sequencers), it’s the person twiddling the knobs.

    Yes!
    A good musician doesn't depend on one specific instrument to create something great.

    @u0421793 said:
    Synthesisers and electronic music. I can’t decide where they fit in history. I suspect they are part of an obsolete part of history, one that isn’t here any more. I suspect they’re part of the hippie movement. They’re not part of the Victorian era, although perhaps should be. They’re not part of the punk nihilism and destruction. I think they’re basically the television age, which is over now.

    Why does music have to satisfy the measures of a certain epoc, a certain movement, a certain group of people?

  • Yep, „Linux is obsolete“. This was said by Prof. Tannenbaum to Linus Torvalds. The rest is history. Now Linux is the most ubiquitous operating system on the planet.

  • @krassmann said:
    Yep, „Linux is obsolete“. This was said by Prof. Tannenbaum to Linus Torvalds. The rest is history. Now Linux is the most ubiquitous operating system on the planet.

    And any year now, it’ll be the ‘year of the Linux desktop’!

  • Proclamations of obsolescence is antediluvian.

  • @AudioGus said:
    Proclamations of obsolescence is antediluvian.

    Nostalgia is a thing of the past

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