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Are iOS Producers Looked Down Upon

I sometimes get the feeling that those who use Windows or Mac look down on us iOS producers. I don’t think a lot of them understand what’s out there and how much you can get for so little. Anyone else feeling this?

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Comments

  • @YourJunk said:
    I sometimes get the feeling that those who use Windows or Mac look down on us iOS producers. I don’t think a lot of them understand what’s out there and how much you can get for so little. Anyone else feeling this?

    I wish it was more about the music, not the tools.

  • @YourJunk said:
    I sometimes get the feeling that those who use Windows or Mac look down on us iOS producers. I don’t think a lot of them understand what’s out there and how much you can get for so little. Anyone else feeling this?

    You hang with Windows/Mac producers? Those people are beneath contempt. Lazy and spending on tools like money grows on streaming sites and concert venues and in clubs.

    Friend a better class of loosers.

    (I tried to mark this as humor but can't remember the proper markup text).

    Seriously, I would look down on anyone trying to make money with IOS tools tool. Use the best tools you can afford.

    But I respect anyone that can make convincing music products with IOS. It's always the results that matter and not the tools.

    Imagine 5 musicians showing up and wanting to be recorded quickly with fidelity and I have
    an iPad running Auria Pro. Seriously?

    I use IOS tools to save a lot of money and it's working better than I could have ever imagined and the results speak for themselves... it's not the tools. It's effort and talent. I apply little of the former and have little of the latter but it's still a lot of fun and challenging.

    I also use IOS tools to replace the 5 musicians and have more time to fail on the path to adequate.

  • I look UP on all of you. iOS producers are resilient and creative. 👍👍

  • @analog_matt said:
    I look UP on all of you. iOS producers are resilient and creative. 👍👍

    The heroes are the toolmakers that sell their work at prices we can afford. Like free and near-free synth. They stand on the shoulders of the open source library makers like Aure.

    I also respect Apple for their attention to user-centered products that deliver quality experience... Logic Pro X on a MacBook is amazing tool and only sets you back $1-2K to get started.

    Tradeoffs and decisions.

  • edited January 7

    There are always going to be those who adhere to the idea that professionals only use professional equipment. That's a very basic and close-minded perspective.
    Professionalism can be exhibited by almost anyone, regardless of their means or the tools at their disposal.
    A professional can use the same tools as an amateur and achieve professional results, an amateur can use professional tools and achieve amateurish results.

    That being said, I think the iOS tools available are great for individuals but not so strong that an iPad could realistically be the main machine in a recording studio setup for multiple musicians.

    I think the biggest obstacle for the future of iOS audio production is Apple's inability to significantly acknowledge this community's feedback and input regarding their products and potential for development.

    I remember 20 years ago showing a friend Tuareg by @brambos and they said I was "cheating" because I made beats on the computer instead of using an MPC. That same friend then said an SP-505 wasn't legit enough to be considered "professional" gear (never mind that I was sampling my own drum set, bass, and guitar). We did not stay friends for long and as far as I'm aware he only ever used an MPC and samples from vinyl or tape (he thought sampling CD's or mp3's was cheating too).

    I hope that dude has an iPad or iPhone loaded with apps now and thinks about how silly he sounded back in the day.

  • edited January 7

    The people who have given me the most shit eating grins about it are people who don't even make music. I find the desktop folks I know have for the most part simply conceded that they just lack the patience for it.

  • @3sleeves
    "There are always going to be those who adhere to the idea that professionals only use professional equipment. That's a very basic and close-minded perspective.
    Professionalism can be exhibited by almost anyone, regardless of their means or the tools at their disposal.
    A professional can use the same tools as an amateur and achieve professional results, an amateur can use professional tools and achieve amateurish results.

    That being said, I think the iOS tools available are great for individuals but not so strong that an iPad could realistically be the main machine in a recording studio setup for multiple musicians."

    +1

    iOS is great for individual projects, mockups and
    for many clients the end result is the final result.

    The strengths of iOS is in it's immediacy.
    A session musician for instance can walk into any studio
    and have their tone/sound palette ready at an instant.

    It's weakness is in it's instability.
    It crashes and often.

    When a client is there it's not a good look to have to reboot every five minutes.
    Twenty years ago you could've gotten away with that but now?
    No.

    Still saying that, I've known artists, producers and composers to
    walk into a meeting with only a guitar and get the commission.

    An artist with vision only needs to be there.

    So no I don't think iOS producers are looked down upon.
    If your skill set doesn't match the project?

    Go and study.

    Build up your reputation for quality.

    Don't blame the tools.

  • I’ve been using desktop computers for music production both as a profession and hobby for 40 years .. and now use iPads. No I don’t look down on myself 🙄

  • @cloudswimmer said:
    I’ve been using desktop computers for music production both as a profession and hobby for 40 years .. and now use iPads. No I don’t look down on myself 🙄

    Awesome.

  • It's human nature. Certain people will always look for a reason to look down on someone else. I doubt many people could tell the difference when listening to a well-produced end product not knowing what gear was used.

  • It only means they have not understood the value of mobile apps and the mobility they offer.

  • @cloudswimmer said:
    I’ve been using desktop computers for music production both as a profession and hobby for 40 years .. and now use iPads. No I don’t look down on myself 🙄

    Love it.

  • @Gravitas - +1
    Your points resonated well.

    @YourJunk - Because laptops and PCs have been out for a while, there's no real way to easily catch up to 40 or more years of experience. It's kinda reminiscent of my life where I have to learn so many different things because as someone in his 20s, I wasn't around for the transition of technology, and I wasn't in the optimal position to learn everything.

    But, I make do with what I can. And I appreciate my strengths, while learning whatever I feel will drive my understanding to the next level.

    iPads may not be the true laptop replacement, or a PC Powerhouse, but I appreciate its advantage - Musical Instruments that are designed for the touch interface, easily accessible, and can be accessed by the push of a button.

    Plus, there's no rule that states you can't collaborate with other tools. Ableton Link, working with other samples, and even Cloud Computing and Web Music services help bolster the point that musicians no longer need to spend hours upon hours in a dark room producing music (classical music and even modern producers shared this). We can be mobile, share our experiences, and have our work live on in other works.

  • There will always be those who look down upon others for some thing or another. I find it reflects more on the looker than the looked upon.

  • @3sleeves said:
    That being said, I think the iOS tools available are great for individuals but not so strong that an iPad could realistically be the main machine in a recording studio setup for multiple musicians.

    This is what I think too. I think an individual can make an absolutely first class piece of music on iOS but it would be hard to imagine it working well to multi track a band with live instruments.

    That being said, it’s nearly limitless for one person and a set of headphones which is of course amazing. Hey, I think I heard Madlib did it 😉

  • edited January 8

    One of the tracks from Kendrick’s DAMN. Was done on an iPhone. And he does all his stuff on mobile. Steve Lacy.
    https://www.wired.com/2017/04/steve-lacy-iphone-producer/

    He's also working this way to prove a point: that tools don't really matter. He feelds a tension that's been part of the music industry since the Tascam 424 Portastudio made mobile recording easy in the 80s, and has come up time and again since then. He wants to remind people that the performance, the song, the feeling matter more than the gear you use to record it.

  • @animalelder said:
    One of the tracks from Kendrick’s DAMN. Was done on an iPhone. And he does all his stuff on mobile. Steve Lacy.
    https://www.wired.com/2017/04/steve-lacy-iphone-producer/

    He's also working this way to prove a point: that tools don't really matter. He feelds a tension that's been part of the music industry since the Tascam 424 Portastudio made mobile recording easy in the 80s, and has come up time and again since then. He wants to remind people that the performance, the song, the feeling matter more than the gear you use to record it.

    Thank you for sharing this. That’s awesome!

  • Wouldn’t care if they did 😏

  • If your clients like your music they give to shit what you made it on.............. Let your music speak for you

  • edited January 8

    it's totally true. There is even more - many of them are convinced that can hear "thin" sound of iOS apps lol :)))

    Truth is, people are looking down to other people all the time from all kinds of reasons, it's their nature - music genre, clothing, political view, religion, social status, country of origin, skin color, gender, sexual orientation, anything.. you name it

    important is to not take personally anything other people said. It's not about you, it's about them. It's shit in their heads not in your hands. What they say is telling story about them, not about you,

  • And a person using a neve console recording an orchestra with beautiful mics may “look down” on a person using a Mac or PC. If they do, that’s silly. Every method of making music has things that are easy and things that are difficult. But one thing never changes, and that is the mind and body that are putting out the creativity. Without that, tools are useless.

    I stopped using iOS as my main music tool because I mostly work with live musicians, so multitracking and mixing live shows or sessions is not where the strength of iOS lies. But in the song I was working on tonight, I did the drum loop that runs through the song on patterning, which really worked well for that. The live instruments were recorded on my Mac. It’s working together, and it either sounds good or it doesn’t. Also, once I got my Apollo x8, I heard the difference great preamps and converters make, so I don’t want to go back to any of my interfaces that would connect to my iPad to track live music unless that was my only option or I’d miss capturing the recording- then equipment doesn’t win, the best equipment would be what was there.

    Can I record a live show to auria? yes, I’ve done it when I use the x32, but given that I have way more storage on my mac and also the xlive card, I don’t need to. And when I’m using a digico, it won’t interface to iPad, so I couldn’t do it there. Besides, my iPad is being used as a control surface anyway.

    In the end, if it sounds good, it sounds good. People too hung up on the tools typically don’t ever finish any music.

  • The ones saying that probably aren’t finishing a whole lot of tracks cos they’re too busy being pretentious

  • One thing to add to that soapbox- I have been in the company of some pretty exceptional musicians, engineers, and producers in the past few years, and something I found to be in common was that they are humble and don’t look down on anyone. A very well known, world class bassist was at a church service I mixed last week because his wife was playing cello, and he had only great things to say to everyone. He has played there before as well and was just as wonderful in those cases. That attitude certainly has to more to do with his success than his playing facility, which is quite incredible as well.

  • Once, analog camera owners said "digital is a toy compared to analog". Some time later digital owners said "phone cameras are toys compared to digital". Cubase users said "fruity loops is a toy compared to serious daws". History is full of false future predictions.

  • @YourJunk said:
    I sometimes get the feeling that those who use Windows or Mac look down on us iOS producers. I don’t think a lot of them understand what’s out there and how much you can get for so little. Anyone else feeling this?

    What specifically gives you this feeling?

  • just don't look up or down and you'll be alright

  • “It ain't the toys, its the noise”

  • There was recently a very expensive piece of art made from a Banana and a bit of gaffer tape https://www.vogue.com/article/the-120000-art-basel-banana-explained-maurizio-cattelan

    ... The art, not the tools

  • The part of me that uses a Mac looks down on the part of me that uses an iPad. When I use my iPhone, tablet guy looks down on that. I just tell them to f#$% off, you suck regardless.

  • @DaveMagoo said:

    @YourJunk said:
    I sometimes get the feeling that those who use Windows or Mac look down on us iOS producers. I don’t think a lot of them understand what’s out there and how much you can get for so little. Anyone else feeling this?

    What specifically gives you this feeling?

    I’ve gotten some looks from people when I mention why I bought my iPad, including those “in the biz”. Also had a recent conversation on Reddit with someone shooting down the idea of using iOS professionally.

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