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Stop iOS downloading update

Is there any way to stop my iPad downloading the flipping iOS update? I’m still on 12x - I will update soon, but when I decide to, not when Apple forces me to.

It keeps downloading the installer and knocking my storage over its limit, and obviously slowing the iPad performance while it’s doing it. I’ve deleted it twice now.

Automatic updates are off.

Cheers.

Comments

  • There's no way to turn off automatic downloading of an update, but if the constant nagging pisses you off mate, just delete the downloaded update. Settings>General>iPad Storage and find the son of a gun that has the gear icon. Delete that like you would any app from that page, and boom. No more nagging until the next update number downloads automatically. ;)

  • This method has worked perfectly for me, my iPhone 7 Plus is blocked on 12.3.1.

    https://www.idownloadblog.com/2017/12/11/block-ios-updates/

  • edited October 2019

    It used to be possible to block access to the firmware update server using Weblock, but I haven’t tried it recently. If you only charge when in airplane mode, that usually blocks firmware updates too.

  • edited October 2019

    It’s useful to have something large and unwanted to delete when storage space gets low on a device that’s frozen for security/alchemical reasons!

  • Cheers guys, couple of things to try there.

  • I think, on my iPad Pro 9.7 with iOS 12.4, I deleted the iPadOS download one or two times and after that, it did not download this again!

    Can delete from the iPad Storage section for all Apps

  • @tja said:
    I think, on my iPad Pro 9.7 with iOS 12.4, I deleted the iPadOS download one or two times and after that, it did not download this again!

    Can delete from the iPad Storage section for all Apps

    I’ve been deleting updates on a regular basis for years on my iPad mini 3 iOS 10.3. Have no clue if anything has changed at Apple but I would be very surprised if it was this easy!

  • I always turn off wifi when I charge my iPad. Never had an iOS update download automatically yet!

  • @Halftone said:
    I always turn off wifi when I charge my iPad. Never had an iOS update download automatically yet!

    Yeah, a couple of people have told me that now, so I’ll see if that works next time I charge it up.

  • @Janosax said:
    This method has worked perfectly for me, my iPhone 7 Plus is blocked on 12.3.1.

    https://www.idownloadblog.com/2017/12/11/block-ios-updates/

    +1

  • meanwhile I became used to the routine to switch off WiFi whenever the iPad isn't in use or network isn't needed anyway.

  • wimwim
    edited October 2019

    @thenonanonymous said:

    @Janosax said:
    This method has worked perfectly for me, my iPhone 7 Plus is blocked on 12.3.1.

    https://www.idownloadblog.com/2017/12/11/block-ios-updates/

    +1

    I feel like I should mention this, even though I have no evidence whatsoever that the two things were related ...

    I took this step on my iPad. It worked. A few days later I noticed that app updates were accumulating on my devices, but would not install. I could buy new apps. I could delete and reinstall apps. But I couldn’t install updates. The little circle would just spin for a second then go back to saying “update”. This was on all my devices, not just the iPad. I literally spent about 30 hours on the phone with Apple tech support over the course of three weeks. I updated iOS on other devices, reset them, restored from backups, completely wiped the phone and started from scratch ... literally walked through dozens of ways Apple support required me to try. They were baffled. Finally, after they exhausted every idea to put me through, they sent it up to some level of engineering that magically fixed my account (but didn’t tell me how).

    It had to be some kind of obscure flag that got thrown on my account because it was for all devices. It could have been related to having updated the expiration date on the credit card linked to my Apple account around the same time. But, I could purchase apps with no issues, so I tend to think that wasn’t it.

    So ... I really can’t say that the steps in that article caused the issue. And I’m not saying you should’t do it. But I thought I should relate what happened to me. I’d feel bad not having said something if anyone else went through what I did.

  • @wim said:

    @thenonanonymous said:

    @Janosax said:
    This method has worked perfectly for me, my iPhone 7 Plus is blocked on 12.3.1.

    https://www.idownloadblog.com/2017/12/11/block-ios-updates/

    +1

    I feel like I should mention this, even though I have no evidence whatsoever that the two things were related ...

    I took this step on my iPad. It worked. A few days later I noticed that app updates were accumulating on my devices, but would not install. I could buy new apps. I could delete and reinstall apps. But I couldn’t install updates. The little circle would just spin for a second then go back to saying “update”. This was on all my devices, not just the iPad. I literally spent about 30 hours on the phone with Apple tech support over the course of three weeks. I updated iOS on other devices, reset them, restored from backups, completely wiped the phone and started from scratch ... literally walked through dozens of ways Apple support required me to try. They were baffled. Finally, after they exhausted every idea to put me through, they sent it up to some level of engineering that magically fixed my account (but didn’t tell me how).

    It had to be some kind of obscure flag that got thrown on my account because it was for all devices. It could have been related to having updated the expiration date on the credit card linked to my Apple account around the same time. But, I could purchase apps with no issues, so I tend to think that wasn’t it.

    So ... I really can’t say that the steps in that article caused the issue. And I’m not saying you should’t do it. But I thought I should relate what happened to me. I’d feel bad not having said something if anyone else went through what I did.

    Good to know. I’m going to try the wifi off when charging - doesn’t seem to download anything with general use, so I reckon that’s when it kicks in.

    I’m going to update soon anyway, but I like to be able to make the decision when to do so rather than having it forced on me.

  • In my case I had zero issues with apps update with this procedure. It’s certainly very hard to troubleshoot those things.

  • wimwim
    edited October 2019

    Me too. I’ve noticed my iPad gets sluggish screen reaction sometimes when I’m using it and it’s plugged in. I believe this is because of download activity.

    Deleting updates seems to make it settle down until the next point-update is released, then it downloads the latest.

    Filling up your iPad with some dummy files so there’s no room to download an update can work too. But that’s not a good solution, obviously.

  • I also have had no issues with the "profile" solution. Maybe it was a combo? (updating the profile + credit card info)

  • @thenonanonymous said:
    I also have had no issues with the "profile" solution. Maybe it was a combo? (updating the profile + credit card info)

    Or completely unrelated to either. I tried pretty hard to get Apple to cough up what they did to solve it, but it was like talking to a plant. I gave up.

  • @wim said:
    I feel like I should mention this, even though I have no evidence whatsoever that the two things were related ...

    I took this step on my iPad. It worked. A few days later I noticed that app updates were accumulating on my devices, but would not install. I could buy new apps. I could delete and reinstall apps. But I couldn’t install updates. The little circle would just spin for a second then go back to saying “update”. This was on all my devices, not just the iPad. I literally spent about 30 hours on the phone with Apple tech support over the course of three weeks. I updated iOS on other devices, reset them, restored from backups, completely wiped the phone and started from scratch ... literally walked through dozens of ways Apple support required me to try. They were baffled. Finally, after they exhausted every idea to put me through, they sent it up to some level of engineering that magically fixed my account (but didn’t tell me how).

    It had to be some kind of obscure flag that got thrown on my account because it was for all devices. It could have been related to having updated the expiration date on the credit card linked to my Apple account around the same time. But, I could purchase apps with no issues, so I tend to think that wasn’t it.

    So ... I really can’t say that the steps in that article caused the issue. And I’m not saying you should’t do it. But I thought I should relate what happened to me. I’d feel bad not having said something if anyone else went through what I did.

    Yikes!... I have to update my response to this issue. I was recommending it before, and had zero issues for 2 or 3 months, but now I would recommend people NOT to use this fake profile method for blocking updates... OR go ahead and do use it (to help send a message to Apple that we want control over this)... but be warned that I just went through what @wim went through. Luckily, it didn't take NEARLY as long since I recalled reading this in this forum here, and therefore I knew what the issue was, and sent a link to this forum discussion to Apple. But it took several hours across last week, phone calls to Apple support, on hold, troubleshooting procedures (they make you go through basic procedures several times before they can "escalate" you up to higher level support), scheduling support appointments, and more procedures including sending diagnostic information about my device. Now it's resolved, but quite a bit of wasted time... or not (if you take the perspective of this whole exercise being "sending a message" to Apple that we do not want that automatic download).

    Interesting to note: one senior support advisor at Apple didn't realize (or didn't believe me) that even if you have "Automatic Updates" turned off... that the download still happens. Maybe he just keeps his on? Maybe they try and hide that fact? (but then why would they show the download to you and allow you to delete it?) A little odd though.

  • Automatic updates off. Update downloaded itself and tells me it will auto install unless I cancel it.....

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