Audiobus: Use your music apps together.

What is Audiobus?Audiobus is an award-winning music app for iPhone and iPad which lets you use your other music apps together. Chain effects on your favourite synth, run the output of apps or Audio Units into an app like GarageBand or Loopy, or select a different audio interface output for each app. Route MIDI between apps — drive a synth from a MIDI sequencer, or add an arpeggiator to your MIDI keyboard — or sync with your external MIDI gear. And control your entire setup from a MIDI controller.

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Audiobus is the app that makes the rest of your setup better.

Spectral Editing in iOS... does it exist? Is it possible? Is there a need for it?

Spectral Editing in iOS... does it exist? Is it possible? Is there a need for it? Anyone care?

I’ve looked and can’t find any. Plenty of spectrum ANALYZERS, but not EDITORS, per se. Is this just too darn CPU intensive for iOS in general? (Except for maybe the latest iPad pro). Too niche? Many options on desktop, even capability in the free DAW Audacity. Here is Reaper’s take on it:

And Izotope RX:

Comments

  • edited August 11

    The only thing I can think of is cs Spectral, it hammers my iPad mini 3.

    6 spectral effects in there. Good fun for the few minutes before the crash!! Maybe more powerful devices don’t suffer?

    Don’t think RX will ever appear on iOS, it’s the only product that Izotope doesn’t offer much discount on. I have been waiting but RX5 does most of what I need.

    Edit: Would recommend getting Iris 2 for a very good price at plugin boutique before 31st August for some spectral fun.

  • @BlueGreenSpiral said:
    The only thing I can think of is cs Spectral, it hammers my iPad mini 3.

    6 spectral effects in there. Good fun for the few minutes before the crash!! Maybe more powerful devices don’t suffer?

    Yes, the more powerful my ipad gets the more stable csspectral gets. It isn’t really a surgical editor though like I think the OP wants. I have enjoyed it a lot though. Would make a nifty AU.

  • Not quite what you are looking for, but you have some spectral editing with the delays in apeDelay.

  • Virtual ANS 3 has a sonogram editor - "you can draw the spectrum and play it at the same time". Also converts wav or jpeg to sonogram. AUv3. Not sure how deep the editing is though.

  • @BlueGreenSpiral @AudioGus
    Thanks for the info about Csspectral. True, not the effect i was necessarily looking for, but glad to hear it is worth investigating. I had given up on it, thinking it was perhaps abandoned. I’ll reconsider. 👍

  • @bleep said:
    Not quite what you are looking for, but you have some spectral editing with the delays in apeDelay.

    Hmmm... will check it out.

  • @StudioES said:
    Virtual ANS 3 has a sonogram editor - "you can draw the spectrum and play it at the same time". Also converts wav or jpeg to sonogram. AUv3. Not sure how deep the editing is though.

    Holy crepè! I completely forgot about Virtual Ans 3! It’s intended more as a “music/sound maker”, but with the AUv3, importing, and editing tools it might perhaps be fashioned into a editing tool. If not, it is obviously a unique sounding app. (I had the first version, and was equally bemused and bewitched by it). Thanks for the idea! 💡 😊

  • Don't be mislead by screen graphics - desktop vendors like Izotope, Celemony and Zynaptiq operate at a frequency resolution that can't even be displayed.
    (iirc 1/100 cent, or 1/10000 of a semitone)
    Such amount of detail requires dedicated software routines to keep up with (near)realtime demands.

  • As some mentioned, Virtual ANS3 can load samples with various import options and it really is one unique sounding mangler with plenty of drawing tools to manipulate the spectrum.

    Especially nice is the touch to use the 'spectrum' as a polyphonic synth, totally awesome!

  • I just use it for correction noise issues in Reaper. I guess I haven't thought about how I could creatively use it like I should. If I thought about that more, I'd use it on iOS. I find the accurate touchscreen is more enjoyable for fine sample editing usually.

  • PPG Infinite, kinda. Load the wave table and make edits to individual frequency slices or the whole thing.

    Not sure how wavetable editing aligns or differed from spectral editing, but it’s a thought.

  • @Telefunky said:
    Don't be mislead by screen graphics - desktop vendors like Izotope, Celemony and Zynaptiq operate at a frequency resolution that can't even be displayed.
    (iirc 1/100 cent, or 1/10000 of a semitone)
    Such amount of detail requires dedicated software routines to keep up with (near)realtime demands.

    I figured such a thing to be a CPU hog. I wonder if it is not different from effects and such though. This imaginably could be used without much else “going on” CPU-wise, do its thing, and then switch off, so to speak. Unlike real time effects and instruments piled high, perhaps? Or so I’m guessing. (As a complete amateur on DSP).

  • @audiblevideo said:
    PPG Infinite, kinda. Load the wave table and make edits to individual frequency slices or the whole thing.

    Not sure how wavetable editing aligns or differed from spectral editing, but it’s a thought.

    I am sure there is no universality of terms but what Spectral editing is in Reaper is a more elaborate way to edit audio. Like zoom in a see the frequency and time domain and you can fix noises, little blips and bloops. I am guessing it can be used creatively but I just haven't gone there.

  • @Multicellular said:
    I just use it for correction noise issues in Reaper. I guess I haven't thought about how I could creatively use it like I should. If I thought about that more, I'd use it on iOS. I find the accurate touchscreen is more enjoyable for fine sample editing usually.

    Oh yea... pinch-and-zoom... it’s a beautiful thing! 😊

  • But not a very convenient operation in this context: while you zoom into one frequency range, it's harmonics (on screen) get further and further away from the choosen point of interest ;)

    The hint by @audiblevideo about Infinite fits this context. Such 'harmonics' may not be exactly where you'd expect them by math rules. This natural displacement is a main feature of Infinite, subtle, but essential.
    But Infinite works reverse to spectral editing: it has methods to generate such content, while spectral editing kind of tries to discover rules from whatever output is presented on screen.
    It can't do this fully on it's own, so usually one has to mark areas supposedly belonging together on the screen.
    Machine learning might improve the handling when it gets more popular.

    Imh understanding (at the moment) spectral editing is handled in a form of re-synthesis.
    This doesn't come without artifacts or at least with a significant change of the original's sound character. It's a thin line between nice and exaggerated.

  • @Telefunky said:
    But not a very convenient operation in this context: while you zoom into one frequency range, it's harmonics (on screen) get further and further away from the choosen point of interest ;)

    The hint by @audiblevideo about Infinite fits this context. Such 'harmonics' may not be exactly where you'd expect them by math rules. This natural displacement is a main feature of Infinite, subtle, but essential.
    But Infinite works reverse to spectral editing: it has methods to generate such content, while spectral editing kind of tries to discover rules from whatever output is presented on screen.
    It can't do this fully on it's own, so usually one has to mark areas supposedly belonging together on the screen.
    Machine learning might improve the handling when it gets more popular.

    Imh understanding (at the moment) spectral editing is handled in a form of re-synthesis.
    This doesn't come without artifacts or at least with a significant change of the original's sound character. It's a thin line between nice and exaggerated.

    Good to know :) Thank you.

  • Toneboosters TB Equalizer plus automation.
    The built-in spectrum analyzer is essential to do spectrum-based editing, and the piano keyboard can really help in spotting areas of interest.

  • Steinberg could release something like this for Cubasis, right? I’m thinking around $20. I may have forgotten a decimal place. 😄

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