Audiobus: Use your music apps together.

What is Audiobus?Audiobus is an award-winning music app for iPhone and iPad which lets you use your other music apps together. Chain effects on your favourite synth, run the output of apps or Audio Units into an app like GarageBand or Loopy, or select a different audio interface output for each app. Route MIDI between apps — drive a synth from a MIDI sequencer, or add an arpeggiator to your MIDI keyboard — or sync with your external MIDI gear. And control your entire setup from a MIDI controller.

Download on the App Store

Audiobus is the app that makes the rest of your setup better.

JAF Collection by Jens Guell (DIGITSTER.COM)

https://apps.apple.com/dk/app/jaf-collection/id1472896422

The JAF Collection is an exciting set of digital modeled classic analog synthesizer filters (VCFs) for iOS. The emphasis of this collection of audio unit effects is professional analog sounding and optimized behavior with touchscreen usage, features that not many currently available apps and plugins do really offer.

The collection is exclusively available for the mobile iOS (version 11 and higher). The apps and the included audio units are “universal”, so they work on iPhones and iPads the same way and also have basically the same appearance and functionality.

Note: These apps are so-called “audio units” (aka plugins), which usually require hosting audio applications to operate. Although, they come with their own basic host applications, which includes for instance IAA (inter-app-audio) connectivity, like mic input and also have
inbuilt MIDI support, to use the filters out of the box, like external hardware devices, without requiring another host application.

The JAF Collection Filters can also act as a synthesizer module due to the fact, that there is an unison oscillator section (VCOs) built in for testing and for live performances. The analog modeled synthesizer has no advanced control or modulators. It just runs the oscillators continuously and can be controlled by MIDI messages.

A manual is shipped in the IAA enabled distribution app.

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Comments

  • Oh my!

  • It looks like their next releases will be:

    DRM-505 : THE CLASSIC DRUM COMPUTER FOR iOS

    THE JAX STEREO TOOL

    Analyze, correct and improve your stereophonic audio material and recover lostmono-compatibility.

    MODULE I6 [ MI6 ]

    A powerful iOS MIDI Sound Module of a special sort.

    We are proud to announce the release of our new powerful MIDI sound module, that at same time is a synthesizer module and an advanced MIDI file player. The app can play MIDI files and playlists and you can send realtime MIDI messages to the integrated (or external) synthesizer modules on its 16 sweet MIDI channels, supporting GM2 Standard Sets. Advanced MIDI connectivity via Inter-app-MIDI, Bluetooth-MIDI and Network-MIDI sessions are also supported. MODULE I6 provides flawless iOS file system integration, also user-defined soundfonts can be loaded and much more...

  • edited July 20

    best thing on that filter is audio rate LFO modulation - sounds very good..

    not sure with resonance, on high level sounds a bit thin in all modes, but need check it more deeply especially in combination with ovedrive.. Anyway for that price nice plugin.. With nice UI :-)

  • NOT designed for the vision challenged or even reg vision 🙄
    Low contrast teeny-tiny interface elements. They look nice just not cognitively immediate. 🙃

  • @audiblevideo you can adjust background color with slider from complete black to complete white...


  • edited July 20

    Are these 'Midi CC Only' or do they also expose the parameters as AUParameters?

  • @AudioGus was it you looking for the one big knob filter ? Maybe this is it, haven't dug in yet

  • Trying the free version first! Love this concept of try before you buy

  • Feels like the iVCS3 or auGenX would make a good 'drone oscillator' companion to these?

  • @Samu said:
    Feels like the iVCS3 or auGenX would make a good 'drone oscillator' companion to these?

    didn't tried it yet but there is also "oscillator" section inside...

  • @dendy said:

    @Samu said:
    Feels like the iVCS3 or auGenX would make a good 'drone oscillator' companion to these?

    didn't tried it yet but there is also "oscillator" section inside...

    True, but if it's a monophonic one multiple instances of iVCS3 or auGenX could turn these filters into dronemonsters :)

  • edited July 20

    Just read the manual for JAF Collection but there is one question that remains...

    When using midi to set the pitch of the oscillator does it also have a 'gate' option so it plays the oscillator as long as note note is held? It does feel likes StepBud will be a a very good companion for this app or maybe even Cubasis with some extreme automation or some synced rozeta LFOs :)

  • edited July 20

    Well well...

    So I got it and the first 'thing' I bump into are screen rendering issues in AUM.

    Especially when changing the contrast, only a small part of the UI...

    And to answer my own question about a gate option the answer is no, the oscillator is either on or off and can not be controlled via note on/off.

    But it sounds quite fat so good for droning :)

  • Interesting, the GUI could do with some work.

  • @TrevorLlewellyn said:
    Interesting, the GUI could do with some work.

    True, will test with some other hosts. It's quite good for feeding the Spectrum modules too.
    I could not hear any audible aliasing with the built-in oscillator and the unison is quite fat.

  • This happens in Audiobus 3 when adjusting the contrast...

  • Despite the UI glitches this app is one heck of a 'alien spaceship engine drone thing' :)

  • Well, it's FUN that's all I can say :)
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/a8co017flpol420/Alienship.wav?dl=0

    It's 'just a drone' from the JAF Collection thru Blackhole, MicroPitch thru Pro-L2 all in apeMatrix...
    (And yeah, the same UI issues are present there as well).

  • @reasOne said:
    @AudioGus was it you looking for the one big knob filter ? Maybe this is it, haven't dug in yet

    Wasn’t me buy yah I do recall the thread. I was in saying it sounded like the Circuits filter knob which would be nice.

  • Can somebody list the filters, it is not on the store description, specifically notch filters ?

  • @Turntablist said:
    Can somebody list the filters, it is not on the store description, specifically notch filters ?

    THE JAF MODELS

    JAF Model One LP/HP
    Model One is a quite aggressive sounding filter model, which technically resembles a 24 dB Full Ladder Filter. It is identical with the free version of the Model One.
    The goal was to create a hybrid kind of filter model, that does not reduce the input volume with higher resonance levels, a fact that usually occurs with Ladder type filters. Its self oscillation with high resonance is very strong and tends to overdriven saturation and even distortion and analog clipping, which makes the filter so aggressive and screaming with higher resonances. The filter is adjusted in a way, that the bass response is emphasized and the feedback is band- limited with higher cutoff frequencies.
    The high pass version was difficult to create, because of the fact that the filter response could not just be inverted due to the none linear approach of the low pass model.

    JAF L50 LP/HP
    This is a So-called Half Ladder Filter with a 12 dB filter slope. It is modeled after the classic Moog Ladder Models (which are all full ladders). It is in principle the half version of the Full Ladder Moog emulation

    JAF L100 LP/HP.
    These filters produce a near perfect sine feedback tone with higher resonances, that often is used as an extra oscillator. There was some adjusting made, that prevents the filter to decrease the input volume with high resonance values.

    JAF L100 LP/HP
    A Full Ladder Filter model that was created to emulate the classic Moog Filter and its descendants. The filter slope is 24 dB.
    The Sound of these filters is generally very clear and well balanced and does not so much overdrive or distort. The bass response is excellent. This type of filter has many lovers, which do not like filter saturation and distortion effects that much. It is therefore mostly implemented in clean sounding classic analog synthesizers to follow the success of a Mini Moog sound.

    JAF K35 LP/HP
    This Filter Model uses a audible different filter design architecture as the Moog-modeled filters. Technically spoken it implements the Sallen- Key filter model. The Korg Synthesizer MS20 used for instance such filters, which are well known (loved and hated) for their aggressive, mostly distorted and screaming sound.
    Usually Moog lovers do not like these Filters and vice versa. But this filter model was the key ingredient for the huge success of the Korg analog synthesizers in the 80s, that had distinctive sound, somewhat separated from the established quite clean Moog sound.

    JAF T30 LP /HP
    There is always a certain rave about a synthesizer filter of the late 80s, that was built into a famous sequenced bass synthesizer from the Roland Corporation. This filter has a Diode Ladder type design, that was certainly not the best sounding filter ever made. Budget was probably one of the reasons and the fact that the synth aimed to simulate a real bass. But the huge success of these electronic transistor bass synthesizers formed a legend about its filter.
    The T30 is a 18 dB Filter, that has a very special squelch in its resonance tone. The filter saturates only slightly, but usually does not overdrive or distort. But the iconic bass synthesizer was often (mis)used in combination with additional overdrive and distortion effects, to compensate the somewhat lame sound of this filter. So the famous “acid sound” comes not from the synthesizer itself but from the heavily stack distorted tones afterwards.
    The filter has a quite obvious problem: It reduces the input volume extremely with higher resonance values. This is probably the reason, why this synthesizer is nearly always connected to a chain of additional amplifiers, compressors and distortion units.
    However, our model was heavily tweaked to overcome some of the obvious design flaws of this filter model. The high pass version is actually a hybrid creation, which never really existed.

    JAF O100 LP/HP
    This filter model is also a Full Ladder implementation with somewhat changed resonance response. The company Oberheim obviously was very fascinated by the clean Moog filter design and sound, but did not like the filter feedback so much. This filter model has nice bass response and has its lovers.

    JAF F24 LP/HP
    An optimized 24 dB State Variable general purpose filter with a rich spectrum resonance tone and a good bass response.

    JAF F6 LP/HP
    A 6 dB variant with a more aggressive resonance tone.

    JAF Model2 ...
    JAF Model7 LP/HP
    These are different, mostly hybrid implementations, that have all different flavor, resonance tuning, saturation and frequency responses.

    JAF C20 - Comb Filter
    The JAF C20 does not have an analog role model like the other filters. It is basically a digital micro delay, where the frequency of the delay buffer can be adjusted in realtime and used like a usual filter module. There is also a resonance parameter, which adjusts the feedback.
    Comb filters have tonal character, because the delays are so short, that the audible result corresponds to audio frequencies rather than to perceptible time measures. These are often used as tunable resonators.
    Our Comb filter model uses double logarithmic frequency scaling and is smoothed by internal windowing, to make the filter sounding more analog rather than digital.

    JAF APF - Static Phaser
    This filter is a very special multi stage all pass model with variable phase adjustment and feedback. The phase adjustment (cutoff parameter) shifts the frequencies of the audio input in a special way so that it can be used like a coloring filter. The frequency response is affine to a resonator, especially in the lower frequency range.
    Although it often sounds similar to a variable band stop filter, the result is generally somewhat different. It is rather a “static”or ‘frozen” phaser effect, that misses integrated LFOs, making the frequency sweeps freely adjustable and controllable by manual interaction and special modulation.

    JAF DUAL PRO
    While the standard modules in the JAF (Just A Filter) collection produce single filter effects, the PRO collection includes combinations of 2 filters in serial or parallel connection.
    A serial connection of a HPF and a LPF for instance, will produce a band pass filter, where the frequencies can be adjusted in free manner. This is for instance used on the popular Korg MS20 semi modular synthesizer, which used a fixed serial connection of a high pass an a low pass filter.
    These dual filters combine freely selectable filter models in serial or parallel connection. The parameters for drive, resonance and cutoff frequency can be adjusted independently. The cutoff parameters can be linked together, so that a width-variable band pass or band stop filter can be constructed.
    A serial connection means that the first filter result is completely passed to the second filter, while a parallel connection processes independently and mixes the two results together with a final balance parameter. Thus, serial connection practically produces a band pass filter and parallel connection produces a band stop filter, if a high pass and a low pass filter are connected together.
    The additional balance parameter is active in both connections to adjust the relations of the 2 filter modules. This is more effective with the parallel connection, of course.
    Please note, that the Dual Pro Collection has slightly different MIDI implementation to make everything controllable via MIDI.

  • @White said:

    @Turntablist said:
    Can somebody list the filters, it is not on the store description, specifically notch filters ?

    THE JAF MODELS

    JAF Model One LP/HP
    Model One is a quite aggressive sounding filter model, which technically resembles a 24 dB Full Ladder Filter. It is identical with the free version of the Model One.
    The goal was to create a hybrid kind of filter model, that does not reduce the input volume with higher resonance levels, a fact that usually occurs with Ladder type filters. Its self oscillation with high resonance is very strong and tends to overdriven saturation and even distortion and analog clipping, which makes the filter so aggressive and screaming with higher resonances. The filter is adjusted in a way, that the bass response is emphasized and the feedback is band- limited with higher cutoff frequencies.
    The high pass version was difficult to create, because of the fact that the filter response could not just be inverted due to the none linear approach of the low pass model.

    JAF L50 LP/HP
    This is a So-called Half Ladder Filter with a 12 dB filter slope. It is modeled after the classic Moog Ladder Models (which are all full ladders). It is in principle the half version of the Full Ladder Moog emulation

    JAF L100 LP/HP.
    These filters produce a near perfect sine feedback tone with higher resonances, that often is used as an extra oscillator. There was some adjusting made, that prevents the filter to decrease the input volume with high resonance values.

    JAF L100 LP/HP
    A Full Ladder Filter model that was created to emulate the classic Moog Filter and its descendants. The filter slope is 24 dB.
    The Sound of these filters is generally very clear and well balanced and does not so much overdrive or distort. The bass response is excellent. This type of filter has many lovers, which do not like filter saturation and distortion effects that much. It is therefore mostly implemented in clean sounding classic analog synthesizers to follow the success of a Mini Moog sound.

    JAF K35 LP/HP
    This Filter Model uses a audible different filter design architecture as the Moog-modeled filters. Technically spoken it implements the Sallen- Key filter model. The Korg Synthesizer MS20 used for instance such filters, which are well known (loved and hated) for their aggressive, mostly distorted and screaming sound.
    Usually Moog lovers do not like these Filters and vice versa. But this filter model was the key ingredient for the huge success of the Korg analog synthesizers in the 80s, that had distinctive sound, somewhat separated from the established quite clean Moog sound.

    JAF T30 LP /HP
    There is always a certain rave about a synthesizer filter of the late 80s, that was built into a famous sequenced bass synthesizer from the Roland Corporation. This filter has a Diode Ladder type design, that was certainly not the best sounding filter ever made. Budget was probably one of the reasons and the fact that the synth aimed to simulate a real bass. But the huge success of these electronic transistor bass synthesizers formed a legend about its filter.
    The T30 is a 18 dB Filter, that has a very special squelch in its resonance tone. The filter saturates only slightly, but usually does not overdrive or distort. But the iconic bass synthesizer was often (mis)used in combination with additional overdrive and distortion effects, to compensate the somewhat lame sound of this filter. So the famous “acid sound” comes not from the synthesizer itself but from the heavily stack distorted tones afterwards.
    The filter has a quite obvious problem: It reduces the input volume extremely with higher resonance values. This is probably the reason, why this synthesizer is nearly always connected to a chain of additional amplifiers, compressors and distortion units.
    However, our model was heavily tweaked to overcome some of the obvious design flaws of this filter model. The high pass version is actually a hybrid creation, which never really existed.

    JAF O100 LP/HP
    This filter model is also a Full Ladder implementation with somewhat changed resonance response. The company Oberheim obviously was very fascinated by the clean Moog filter design and sound, but did not like the filter feedback so much. This filter model has nice bass response and has its lovers.

    JAF F24 LP/HP
    An optimized 24 dB State Variable general purpose filter with a rich spectrum resonance tone and a good bass response.

    JAF F6 LP/HP
    A 6 dB variant with a more aggressive resonance tone.

    JAF Model2 ...
    JAF Model7 LP/HP
    These are different, mostly hybrid implementations, that have all different flavor, resonance tuning, saturation and frequency responses.

    JAF C20 - Comb Filter
    The JAF C20 does not have an analog role model like the other filters. It is basically a digital micro delay, where the frequency of the delay buffer can be adjusted in realtime and used like a usual filter module. There is also a resonance parameter, which adjusts the feedback.
    Comb filters have tonal character, because the delays are so short, that the audible result corresponds to audio frequencies rather than to perceptible time measures. These are often used as tunable resonators.
    Our Comb filter model uses double logarithmic frequency scaling and is smoothed by internal windowing, to make the filter sounding more analog rather than digital.

    JAF APF - Static Phaser
    This filter is a very special multi stage all pass model with variable phase adjustment and feedback. The phase adjustment (cutoff parameter) shifts the frequencies of the audio input in a special way so that it can be used like a coloring filter. The frequency response is affine to a resonator, especially in the lower frequency range.
    Although it often sounds similar to a variable band stop filter, the result is generally somewhat different. It is rather a “static”or ‘frozen” phaser effect, that misses integrated LFOs, making the frequency sweeps freely adjustable and controllable by manual interaction and special modulation.

    JAF DUAL PRO
    While the standard modules in the JAF (Just A Filter) collection produce single filter effects, the PRO collection includes combinations of 2 filters in serial or parallel connection.
    A serial connection of a HPF and a LPF for instance, will produce a band pass filter, where the frequencies can be adjusted in free manner. This is for instance used on the popular Korg MS20 semi modular synthesizer, which used a fixed serial connection of a high pass an a low pass filter.
    These dual filters combine freely selectable filter models in serial or parallel connection. The parameters for drive, resonance and cutoff frequency can be adjusted independently. The cutoff parameters can be linked together, so that a width-variable band pass or band stop filter can be constructed.
    A serial connection means that the first filter result is completely passed to the second filter, while a parallel connection processes independently and mixes the two results together with a final balance parameter. Thus, serial connection practically produces a band pass filter and parallel connection produces a band stop filter, if a high pass and a low pass filter are connected together.
    The additional balance parameter is active in both connections to adjust the relations of the 2 filter modules. This is more effective with the parallel connection, of course.
    Please note, that the Dual Pro Collection has slightly different MIDI implementation to make everything controllable via MIDI.

    Well this list made me buy this while on the crapper

  • Got the free version, but it's lacking AU parameters. :/ Sounds sweet though on KQ Dixie.

  • edited July 20

    @nondes said:
    Got the free version, but it's lacking AU parameters. :/ Sounds sweet though on KQ Dixie.

    Yeah, that is a 'bummer' but it supports Midi CC so using for example Midi Send AUv3 (part of apeMatrix) solves that.

    I'm more bummed by the UI rendering issues which should have been sorted out before release...

    The oscillator in it is pretty sweet with fat unison and audio-rate modulation.
    Rozeta LFO can be used with ramp wave to add pulsating sound to it if needed.

    A 'gate' option would be handy as well (ie. play the oscillator while a note is held down).

    I do like the sound of the filters :)

  • @Samu said:
    Despite the UI glitches this app is one heck of a 'alien spaceship engine drone thing' :)

    The contrast is deff jacked up and I couldn't close the modulation window on the free version... But you can pinch to zoom inside the AUM window to make it fit better

  • I’m liking the sound so far. My only UI issue has been the brightness setting. It gets in the way sometimes when I’m resizing and trying to click on something in the middle of the screen. I’ll mess around with it more when I’m not at work

  • Is the documentation off by one for cc? Seems like cutoff is 1 not 2. Also would like to see the GUI respond to CC.

  • edited July 21

    So, anyone wanna help me before I go off the deep end?
    I’m just being an idiot!

    UI goofiness still stands:

    • modal panels that that don't appear in the same place (middle of the app - is where I'd expect it)
    • the brightness control not being labeled and too close to the cutoff dial
    • swiping left and right to change filters when the interface element to the right of it indicates a list drop down or maybe swipe up and down (ARG)
    • grey borders on the top and bottom after changing UI contrast
    • No two finger or any finger swipe to move the interface (from being cut off ) in landscape mode <— pinch and zoom WTF!

    I apologize, I had a moment.

  • Erf, wait, so does the paid version have AU automation working in BM3 but the free one does not?

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