Headphone splitter with headset input for iPhone?

Hello

I am looking for a headphone splitter for use during a performance playing music from my iPhone

The performance requires that I use my standard 3.5 apple headphones with the microphone that is attached to the headphone wire, but I would like to run another 3.5 aux cable to a powered speaker

Is anyone aware of a decent quality splitter that will take the iPhone output signal and split it between the iPhone headset and the aux cable while still allowing the iPhone to receive audio from the microphone built into the iPhone headset?

I’ve seen a lot of splitters on amazon that seem to allow you to separate the mic input channel from the headphone out channel, but I’d like to purchase a splitter that sends audio out to the headphones as well as the secondary 3.5 connection while still receiving audio from the headphone mic

Thanks so much!!

Comments

  • edited June 9

    Put something like this:

    or this

    to headphone out of something like this hooked to your iphone

    Its just wires, so there is no difference to sound really, unless you are using some extremely poor poorly shielded cables

  • I would recommend looking at the Roland Go Mixer as well.

  • @ToMess said:
    Put something like this:

    or this

    to headphone out of something like this hooked to your iphone

    Its just wires, so there is no difference to sound really, unless you are using some extremely poor poorly shielded cables

    Thank you!

    Will this do what I was describing re: output audio to the headphone and receive input from the mic on one line, but also output the audio signal to a second set of headphones or a speaker on one line?

  • If you run the cable-split setup (which is correct) in live conditions, you may experience severe feedback problems from the main speakers. The headset mic is non-directional which increases the problem.

  • no way - that adapter is to connect a smartphone headset to the audio inputs of a PC soundcard.

  • @LucidMusicInc said:
    I would recommend looking at the Roland Go Mixer as well.

    Roland Go is for input. The only output is a single 3.5 mm jack.

  • @Telefunky said:
    If you run the cable-split setup (which is correct) in live conditions, you may experience severe feedback problems from the main speakers. The headset mic is non-directional which increases the problem.

    Thank you for this! Do you have any recommendations for inexpensive alternative solutions? The quality of the iPhone headset microphone is adequate for my purposes so I would like to avoid purchasing expensive microphones/io solutions if at all possible

  • edited June 9

    @mistercharlie said:

    @LucidMusicInc said:
    I would recommend looking at the Roland Go Mixer as well.

    Roland Go is for input. The only output is a single 3.5 mm jack.

    You could plug your IOS device into the Go Mixer and use any microphone you want. It's a mixer with digital audio out and it's lightning/USB compatible.

  • @Telefunky said:
    no way - that adapter is to connect a smartphone headset to the audio inputs of a PC soundcard.

    Sort of .
    Plug iphone earbuds and mic into this lead

    Plug mic output from this into pink socket above
    Plug earphone connection to doubler above

  • The problem isn't the microphone itself but that it's mixed into main system output without it's dedicated monitor path. Under headphones it doesn't matter, but on stage the main PA's output is picked up by the mic and may trigger a feedback loop.
    Usually a mixer returns the mic signal more emphasized to the artist's monitor (your headphones) than to the main PA output.
    The very same will happen with any microphone if there's only 1 path to control volume.
    It work, though - under certain conditions (depends on location/volume), you just have very few control.

    An interface (more cables, more 'luggage') solves this problem in a reliable way.
    While you can in fact spend a fortune on great recording microphones, in most cases a simple live mic does the job just fine - unless you have a high quality PA system and the location is acoustically above average.

    The 'standard' Shure SM58 (or the SM57 if you can handle it) are worth the extra expense and still a good buy.
    They have a stunning retail value and deliver a very nice signal on high quality gear, which none of the clones does.
    Many will doubt the last sentence, but who of them did the A/B on Neve or Telefunken preamps ? ;)

  • Rode has some good quality stuff but not sure if it would meet your needs

    http://www.rode.com/accessories/sc6
    https://www.rode.com/accessories/sc6-l

  • @annahahn said:

    @ToMess said:
    Put something like this:

    or this

    to headphone out of something like this hooked to your iphone

    Its just wires, so there is no difference to sound really, unless you are using some extremely poor poorly shielded cables

    Thank you!

    Will this do what I was describing re: output audio to the headphone and receive input from the mic on one line, but also output the audio signal to a second set of headphones or a speaker on one line?

    @annahahn said:

    @ToMess said:
    Put something like this:

    or this

    to headphone out of something like this hooked to your iphone

    Its just wires, so there is no difference to sound really, unless you are using some extremely poor poorly shielded cables

    Thank you!

    Will this do what I was describing re: output audio to the headphone and receive input from the mic on one line, but also output the audio signal to a second set of headphones or a speaker on one line?

    That setup won't do what you are describing, if you use your Apple headphones the mic input and headphone output are all on one jack. The splitter with the red and green ends allows you to take a set of headphones with a boom mic that has separate jacks for mic in and headphone out and combine them to use with an iPhone.

    You'd need the reverse- a splitter, which would then go into that combiner that also used the headphone jack Y cable on the headphone side. That's a lot of adapters live but it would work. Working well and sounding good might be a different story, but the connections world go where they needed.

    So, split the apple cable to mic and headphone plugs, then plug the mic plug directly into the combiner that puts them back to trrs for the iPhone input, and plug a headphone splitter into the headphone side of the combiner, plug the headphone side of the Apple headphone splitter into one side and your trs cable to the other that would go to your powered speaker (a 1/8" trs to xlr cable would be your friend there).

  • edited June 9

    @annahahn said:

    @ToMess said:
    Put something like this:

    or this

    to headphone out of something like this hooked to your iphone

    Its just wires, so there is no difference to sound really, unless you are using some extremely poor poorly shielded cables

    Thank you!

    Will this do what I was describing re: output audio to the headphone and receive input from the mic on one line, but also output the audio signal to a second set of headphones or a speaker on one line?

    It will give one input for mic and 2 identical stereo outputs, one for headphones and one for speakers/other headphones/whatever. The one you plug to phone sepapares combined mic in/stereo output plug to separate mic and stereo jacks, the other one splits the stereo output to 2 stereo outputs

  • @mrufino1 said:

    @annahahn said:

    @ToMess said:
    Put something like this:

    or this

    to headphone out of something like this hooked to your iphone

    Its just wires, so there is no difference to sound really, unless you are using some extremely poor poorly shielded cables

    Thank you!

    Will this do what I was describing re: output audio to the headphone and receive input from the mic on one line, but also output the audio signal to a second set of headphones or a speaker on one line?

    @annahahn said:

    @ToMess said:
    Put something like this:

    or this

    to headphone out of something like this hooked to your iphone

    Its just wires, so there is no difference to sound really, unless you are using some extremely poor poorly shielded cables

    Thank you!

    Will this do what I was describing re: output audio to the headphone and receive input from the mic on one line, but also output the audio signal to a second set of headphones or a speaker on one line?

    That setup won't do what you are describing, if you use your Apple headphones the mic input and headphone output are all on one jack. The splitter with the red and green ends allows you to take a set of headphones with a boom mic that has separate jacks for mic in and headphone out and combine them to use with an iPhone.

    You'd need the reverse- a splitter, which would then go into that combiner that also used the headphone jack Y cable on the headphone side. That's a lot of adapters live but it would work. Working well and sounding good might be a different story, but the connections world go where they needed.

    So, split the apple cable to mic and headphone plugs, then plug the mic plug directly into the combiner that puts them back to trrs for the iPhone input, and plug a headphone splitter into the headphone side of the combiner, plug the headphone side of the Apple headphone splitter into one side and your trs cable to the other that would go to your powered speaker (a 1/8" trs to xlr cable would be your friend there).

    A simpler approach is to start with a trrs splitter like this: https://www.amazon.com/CablesOnline-Female-Stereo-Splitter-IP-Y02/dp/B00IKMSMWI. Plug your headphone-mic combination into one side. Then plug a pink/green mic/headphone splitter like shown in the previous post into the other side of that, and use the green (headphone) side to feed your speaker (leave the mic side empty).

  • @Rebus_Knebus said:

    @mrufino1 said:

    @annahahn said:

    @ToMess said:
    Put something like this:

    or this

    to headphone out of something like this hooked to your iphone

    Its just wires, so there is no difference to sound really, unless you are using some extremely poor poorly shielded cables

    Thank you!

    Will this do what I was describing re: output audio to the headphone and receive input from the mic on one line, but also output the audio signal to a second set of headphones or a speaker on one line?

    @annahahn said:

    @ToMess said:
    Put something like this:

    or this

    to headphone out of something like this hooked to your iphone

    Its just wires, so there is no difference to sound really, unless you are using some extremely poor poorly shielded cables

    Thank you!

    Will this do what I was describing re: output audio to the headphone and receive input from the mic on one line, but also output the audio signal to a second set of headphones or a speaker on one line?

    That setup won't do what you are describing, if you use your Apple headphones the mic input and headphone output are all on one jack. The splitter with the red and green ends allows you to take a set of headphones with a boom mic that has separate jacks for mic in and headphone out and combine them to use with an iPhone.

    You'd need the reverse- a splitter, which would then go into that combiner that also used the headphone jack Y cable on the headphone side. That's a lot of adapters live but it would work. Working well and sounding good might be a different story, but the connections world go where they needed.

    So, split the apple cable to mic and headphone plugs, then plug the mic plug directly into the combiner that puts them back to trrs for the iPhone input, and plug a headphone splitter into the headphone side of the combiner, plug the headphone side of the Apple headphone splitter into one side and your trs cable to the other that would go to your powered speaker (a 1/8" trs to xlr cable would be your friend there).

    A simpler approach is to start with a trrs splitter like this: https://www.amazon.com/CablesOnline-Female-Stereo-Splitter-IP-Y02/dp/B00IKMSMWI. Plug your headphone-mic combination into one side. Then plug a pink/green mic/headphone splitter like shown in the previous post into the other side of that, and use the green (headphone) side to feed your speaker (leave the mic side empty).

    That is simpler.

    I'm not sure why the original post states that using the iPhone headset is a requirement, maybe it's for a play or something, bit having to use the iPhone headset does complicate things. Also, passive splitters like this can cause some issues live with ground loops, signal loss, etc. Not that it can't be done, but certainly not the ideal situation.

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