Audiobus: Your virtual music studio.

What is Audiobus?Audiobus is an award-winning music app for iPhone and iPad which lets you use your other music apps together. Chain effects on your favourite synth, run the output of apps or Audio Units into an app like GarageBand or Loopy, or select a different audio interface output for each app. Route MIDI between apps — drive a synth from a MIDI sequencer, or add an arpeggiator to your MIDI keyboard — or sync with your external MIDI gear. And control your entire setup from a MIDI controller.

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Audiobus is the app that makes the rest of your setup better.

Documents by readdle to AudioShare workflow?

Is there a way to move files from documents by readdle into audioshare or put them into the audioshare directory or in a file path where audioshare can access them without having to copy them/create duplicate files through an importing process?

Comments

  • No but you can open the ios files app and copy the folder from readdle into audioshare folder most likely

  • The biggest drawback on iOS for file management is all of the duplicate files. Having to duplicate sample libraries for NS2, BM3, Gadget, Cubasis etc is just nuts and anything but 'pro'. Yah I'm lookin at you sexy 10.5 Pro.

  • Technically APFS doesn't create a duplicate when you copy a file. There is still only one "copy" of the file. All the instances point to the same data on the disk. They're kind of like aliases on the Mac.

    If you modify any of those copies, only then will an actual copy of that particular one be made. You could make 1000 copies of a 200MB file in different folders, and if you don't modify any of them, only 200MB will be filled up.

    It's clever, but confusing as hell.

  • wimwim
    edited June 8

    Humm. I wonder what happens if you delete the original file. Are there then 1000 copies, or does another become the “real” one.

  • edited June 8

    @wim said:
    Humm. I wonder what happens if you delete the original file. Are there then 1000 copies, or does another become the “real” one.

    Deleting the original file while a linked copy still exists will just remove the file system reference of the original file to the actual data stored in the file system. As long as the file remains unchanged, the actual data will always be the same storage block, no matter how many copies >0 exist.

  • Incidentally @Retronyms Audiocopy seems to be broken again. It’s unable to do a simple copy without needing to connect to the App Store to link the copied audio to the destination app.

  • @rs2000 said:

    @wim said:
    Humm. I wonder what happens if you delete the original file. Are there then 1000 copies, or does another become the “real” one.

    Deleting the original file while a linked copy still exists will just remove the file system reference of the original file to the actual data stored in the file system. As long as the file remains unchanged, the actual data will always be the same storage block, no matter how many copies >0 exist.

    If that’s true, it’s great. I just might have to do some tests, skeptic that I am. ;)

  • @wim said:

    @rs2000 said:

    @wim said:
    Humm. I wonder what happens if you delete the original file. Are there then 1000 copies, or does another become the “real” one.

    Deleting the original file while a linked copy still exists will just remove the file system reference of the original file to the actual data stored in the file system. As long as the file remains unchanged, the actual data will always be the same storage block, no matter how many copies >0 exist.

    If that’s true, it’s great. I just might have to do some tests, skeptic that I am. ;)

    I'd like to hear about your results. One tricky thing is that it's hard to accurately find out how much storage is being used.

  • The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • @EyeOhEss said:

    @mistercharlie said:
    Technically APFS doesn't create a duplicate when you copy a file. There is still only one "copy" of the file. All the instances point to the same data on the disk. They're kind of like aliases on the Mac.

    If you modify any of those copies, only then will an actual copy of that particular one be made. You could make 1000 copies of a 200MB file in different folders, and if you don't modify any of them, only 200MB will be filled up.

    It's clever, but confusing as hell.

    Wow, is this for real? I’ve aways been really reluctant to copy long stems between apps etc. But sounds like they don’t take any space unless destructively edited at some point down the line? Wish I’d known this sooner! Thanks for the insight :)

    And even after you edit some of them, the files will continue to share the unmodified blocks

  • The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • I'm already seeing myself using Files.app in iOS/iPadOS13 to store and manage all my samples and then using Drag'n'Drop from the 'files fly-over' to load the samples and other files.

    Currently I keep all my samples stored and organised inside BM3 but that may change when iOS/iPadOS13 drops.

    I can easily access the files from most apps that support the document picker or accept files sent to them using 'open in...' and in those cases I can use Files.app already.

    Since iOS13 will support external storage I will be able to keep a USB-Drive hooked to my hub and access files from there and import them to the current project and thus avoiding 'trashing' the original files...

    And yeah APFS is pretty awesome in avoiding 'real duplicates' and creates virtual copies and a 'real' copy is made only when changes are made to one of the copies.

  • More on this. It's called APFS cloning if you want to read up on it.

    Everything you need to know about Carbon Copy Cloner and APFS | Carbon Copy Cloner | Bombich Software

    APFS cloning allows the user to instantly create copies of files on the same volume without consuming extra storage space. When cloning a file, the file system doesn’t create copies of the data, rather it creates a second reference to the file that can be modified independently of the first file. The two files will share storage on the disk for portions of the files that remain identical, but changes to either file will be written to different parts of the disk. APFS file cloning only works when you make copies of a file on the same volume (e.g. duplicate a file or folder in the Finder). CCC is typically copying files between volumes, so APFS cloning isn't applicable for that kind of task.

  • @mistercharlie said:
    More on this. It's called APFS cloning if you want to read up on it.........

    Thanks!

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