CD manufacturing question...

Notice quite a few of the music bods on the Twittersphere are doing their own short run CD production, using inkjet printers for the covers and labels.

Anyone here doing anything like that? Would be interesting in hearing how you get on, and any recommendations for kit.

Comments

  • I did this in high school for a small batch of CDs - probably around 75 CDs. As you've mentioned, I used an inkjet printer for the label - and it turned out to be a very high quality label that easily stuck on to the CD. The label "paper" was just something I bought at an office supply store - I'm sure there are plenty to find on the internet now. I can't remember what we used, but it worked out very well.

  • Memories...

  • Same memories for me, I bought many of those kits 15 years ago. Downside is that a lot of CD players would not be tall enough for the cd and label and they could potentially get stuck. I had a fan get,pretty upset when one of my cds got stuck in this car player for 2 years 😂

  • Hmm..thanks yeah, I remember those old label printers, just wondering if they'd come up with a better way. I remember they brought out CD's that could be printed on directly, without a label, but it worked out expensive.

  • Sharpies work great.
    Low tech, punk rock aesthetic.
    B)

  • I'd just use a service nowadays to press/print em. I think that was the last one I did around ten years ago.

  • I used to print directly to disc, it looked great but not worth it in the end especially because of color ink prices. I also made booklets but I’m too anal and spent way too much time chasing perfection.
    I helped a friend do a 50 cd run at Diskmakers and they did a great job. They can also print to blanks so you can burn the discs yourself.

  • Are CDs still a thing?
    Seemed like they were killed off by online steaming.

    I mean, I still own a few hundred of ‘em, but I haven’t bought a new one in years. Still buy used ones occasionally, though. From thrift stores, not music stores.

  • WOW - I had that same kit. Memories for sure!

    @AudioGus said:
    Memories...

  • @CracklePot said:
    Are CDs still a thing?
    Seemed like they were killed off by online steaming.

    I mean, I still own a few hundred of ‘em, but I haven’t bought a new one in years. Still buy used ones occasionally, though. From thrift stores, not music stores.

    Seems to be a bit of a thing for collectors, particularly for short-run type stuff. Just toying with the idea really, but the guys I follow on Twitter seem to sell all theirs.

    @dougdi said:
    I used to print directly to disc, it looked great but not worth it in the end especially because of color ink prices. I also made booklets but I’m too anal and spent way too much time chasing perfection.
    I helped a friend do a 50 cd run at Diskmakers and they did a great job. They can also print to blanks so you can burn the discs yourself.

    Thanks, I'll check their prices. These are pretty good: https://www.vponline.info/ - it's about £30 for 25 CD's, with colour printing on the disks and a colour cardboard sleeve, then you burn them yourself. Bit pricey of your disk burner starts playing up though...

    @AudioGus said:
    I'd just use a service nowadays to press/print em. I think that was the last one I did around ten years ago.

    Yeah I think I'd probably get them to do the whole thing. Might do a short run just for the fun of it, and give them as presents to people I don't like.

  • @CracklePot said:
    Are CDs still a thing?
    Seemed like they were killed off by online steaming.

    I mean, I still own a few hundred of ‘em, but I haven’t bought a new one in years. Still buy used ones occasionally, though. From thrift stores, not music stores.

    I haven't had to do a CD master in probably 7 years now. Kind of amazing how quickly they died off, I went from doing around a 100 a year to almost nothing with a year or so.

    I still have maybe 30 or so of my all time favorite albums on CD, but I look at them mainly as hard copy back ups more than anything these days. The rest I either sold for a penny or (sadly) threw away because no one wanted them.

  • Yep I use an inkjet printer which prints the label on a cd and then print the cover etc on photo paper . Not so much anymore, but occasionally. Did a run for my partners release last year. Quality is very good and costs me maybe an aussie dollar each. Cd s are still a good thing to have for sale at a gig..some people like a tangible product not just a downloaad link on a piece of paper. Old school for sure but hey...so is vinyl...
    Those old cd stompers were a worry though..my mums car cd changer was totally locked up for years by a label of a cd I had sent her..I felt terrible when I inherited her car and finally worked out why she hadnt been able to play her beloved Chopin and Rachmaninoff for all that time.

  • Paper labels were a bad idea, they can throw the disc off balance and yes can peel off over time. They were handy in post studios to hand clients dvds but they weren’t intended for long time storage.

  • Microboards stuff is what I used for years. It automates the burn & print. You can probably get them dirt cheap these days too

  • Light scribe was cool.

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