Modern day guitar shredders?

I got into music as a guitar player following the likes of Satch, Vai, Petrucci, etc; though it's been a long time since I really followed instrumental guitar music. Who out there is sort of carrying the torch for that style of guitar playing these days? Doesn't have to be rock music, but I'm wondering are there any new players that have the sort of universal respect that those players had?

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Comments

  • My vote is split between @flo26 & @theconnactic but if @LinearLineman keeps playing around with GeoShredder they may have competition!

  • edited March 9

    I keep seeing marketing that says the current and future great guitar players are female.
    I don’t know if it is true, or if it is just an attempt to target a new, mostly untapped market.

    I recently watched Mohini Dey on YouTube. If what she is doing on Bass is an indication, then it could very well be true.

  • Jeff loomis was going that way until he joined up with Arch Enemy. I see a lot more YouTube axers then mainstream. Got to run but can post some of my favs later. Some of them are street guitarist that just shred an are amazing.

  • Thanks!

  • Fortunately, the young generation is still playing real instruments

  • Mohini Dey incredible Bass solo

  • @Tarekith Animals as leaders bring together a lot of the refreshing developments in shredding of the last 10-15 years: most obviously the extended range (8 strings); but also the right hand work.

    E.g. :

  • edited March 10

    My favorite shredder of the modern generation is Nick Johnston. He can play with the best of them but what sets him apart is that he is a great song writer. He also as restrain unlike many shredders.

  • Recently bought my first Telecaster off of Reverb, and Reverb sent me a cute web page with links to various Tele-related stuff. One of them was a lesson video by Daniel Donato. He's in his 20s but still looks like a high schooler.

    When I was younger, I was only interested in the rock and fusion shredder guitarist and totally overlooked the country players. My eyes have since been opened to the high skill level at the top of the country scene - rivals anything I've heard coming out of metal or fusion. Donato seems to be the young gun of that scene.

  • @GovernorSilver said:
    Recently bought my first Telecaster off of Reverb, and Reverb sent me a cute web page with links to various Tele-related stuff. One of them was a lesson video by Daniel Donato. He's in his 20s but still looks like a high schooler.

    When I was younger, I was only interested in the rock and fusion shredder guitarist and totally overlooked the country players. My eyes have since been opened to the high skill level at the top of the country scene - rivals anything I've heard coming out of metal or fusion. Donato seems to be the young gun of that scene.

    Maybe about 5 years ago, the country guitar folks would have said Johnny Hiland and Andy Wood would be the young guns to watch. Both still monster players though.

  • I just really like Prince. I'm thrilled whenever a live performance gets sneaked on YouTube for a few moments.

  • Chimp Spanner who post on this forum is a really talented guitarist.

  • edited March 10

    Another player I discovered upon my entry into the Telecaster world, one of those damned good, yet obscure guitar masters - Greg Koch:

    It's not all country - he switches to a Led Zeppelin medley around 3:30

  • Jeff> @oat_phipps said:

    I just really like Prince. I'm thrilled whenever a live performance gets sneaked on YouTube for a few moments.

    So so underrated as a guitarist. For him to jump around in those stilettos and nail it he is fabulous. I miss him so much!!! 💦💦💦💦. << purple rain.

  • Prince and Zappa modern day? Somebody is stuck in the 80’s 🤔🤔

  • @GovernorSilver said:
    Another player I discovered upon my entry into the Telecaster world, one of those damned good, yet obscure guitar masters - Greg Koch:

    Thankfully Koch is very famous nowadays!

  • edited March 10

    @ecou said:
    Prince and Zappa modern day? Somebody is stuck in the 80’s 🤔🤔

    Guilty. It's ok though cause it's not nostalgia (born in '85' so I only have a handful of memories). More of 'I was born in the wrong era of music for growing up'.

  • Born in mid 70’s here. The 80’s was just another decade. You did not miss that much.

  • @ohwell said:

    @GovernorSilver said:
    Another player I discovered upon my entry into the Telecaster world, one of those damned good, yet obscure guitar masters - Greg Koch:

    Thankfully Koch is very famous nowadays!

    I actually never heard of him until I started shopping for a Tele, and in the process of shopping checked out Reverend's Tele-copy models. I knew they produced the Pete Anderson Eastsider T, but noticed they had a new Tele-style model called the Gristlemaster. Curiosity led me to discover the man who inspired this model - a Tele style for bigger guys like him, with his signature pickups.

    I'm kind of like the OP, in that I stopped keeping up w/ the guitar virtuoso scene and only discover the young guns through FB feeds from modern-leaning guitar makers like Strandberg who tend to attract those young shredders.

  • @ecou said:
    Born in mid 70’s here. The 80’s was just another decade. You did not miss that much.

    I disagree. First Van Halen album, and the first 2 Ozzy albums with Randy Rhoads.
    And sure, the first Van Halen album was 1978, but its effect lasted well into the 80’s.

    Then there was Ozzy’s next guitarist Jake E. Lee on Bark at the Moon.

    80’s was the guitar hero era, everybody trying to be shredders.
    Steve Vai and Yngwie Malmsteen are from this era.

  • One thing that struck me about a lot of the videos linked above is how similar everyone's tone was, at least for the rock players.

    Just picked up a Line6 HX Stomp, getting closer and closer to shreddom now myself! Next up, the guitar itself.....

  • edited March 11

    @Tarekith , I’m really glad to see this. I’ve grown tired of “synth this” and “synth that” lifeless instruments that are void of human expression. Just ask Mr. Linn, he knows

    I love synths apps but I feel everyone should play a physical instrument of some sort.
    Off my chest, end of rant

    HEY! CHECK THESE TWO OUT, DEFINITELY CAN SHRED.

  • Johnny Hiland trying a headless guitar for the first time. One of a handful of headless guitar demos that don't go djent-djent

  • Not your typical shredder but Tommy rocks.

  • Guthrie Govan and Jeff Kollman are two that I really like.

  • edited March 11

    Guthrie Govan is my current favorite on that tip. He's just incredible:

    The second clip features him playing a fretless guitar (start at 1:54:38)....

  • I don't find shredding very interesting I'm afraid, it all sounds very samey - as do a lot of the more recent guitarists that I've heard (which admittedly is very limited)

    The man (and the track) responsible for a lot of that 'neo-classicism' style - Uli Roth

  • @CracklePot said:

    @ecou said:
    Born in mid 70’s here. The 80’s was just another decade. You did not miss that much.

    I disagree. First Van Halen album, and the first 2 Ozzy albums with Randy Rhoads.
    And sure, the first Van Halen album was 1978, but its effect lasted well into the 80’s.

    Then there was Ozzy’s next guitarist Jake E. Lee on Bark at the Moon.

    80’s was the guitar hero era, everybody trying to be shredders.
    Steve Vai and Yngwie Malmsteen are from this era.

    Maybe I should have been clearer. I was talking about the current obsession with the 80’s that people seem to have.

    I would agree that the 80’s was a great decade for guitar gymnastics. Don’t get me wrong I am a fan of guitar gymnastics but the 90’s proved gymnastic does not equal good music.

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