PSA: Don't update to iOS 12.4 if you use apps in AB output slot or IAA apps that use the mic.
https://forum.audiob.us/discussion/34030/urgent-psa-hold-off-updating-to-ios-12-4-if-you-use-apps-in-output-slot-in-audiobus

USB Powered Hub: Types Differences or none really?

What is your experience?

Latency?

Efficiency?

Differences of what you used?

I have a cheap as f_ck one and works lovely.

What say you?

Comments

  • edited December 2018

    Interested in the thread as I wouldnt mind a smaller spare for my mini board, but not too much to add personally. I read reviews, looked at specs, and got a Vantec that has a 2.0 A power out so I can keep the iPad charged as well.

    https://www.amazon.com/Vantec-Aluminum-10-Port-Adapter-UGT-AH100U3/dp/B00J8LW04Q?th=1

    Latency, must be low, havent tested, not enough to notice.

    So far so good.

  • The main thing I can see worth consideration is the supply voltage. I have a couple of hubs that run off 5v which makes it easy to power them off a power bank with a USB-to-appropriate-size-barrel-connector cable.

  • @Liquidmantis said:
    The main thing I can see worth consideration is the supply voltage. I have a couple of hubs that run off 5v which makes it easy to power them off a power bank with a USB-to-appropriate-size-barrel-connector cable.

    Sure. But remember 5V is voltage. You'll want to insure you provide enough current (Amps) to run everything you connect at one time before you burn something out. Daisy chaining 2-3 device at 5V's will likely over run one of them for current carrying.

    It's like connecting 1500 Watt hair dryers (1500watts/110V = 13Amps) to a power strip and blowing the internal 15A circuit breaker with 2. Many have seen this effect connecting their older iPads using 3rd party 5V iPhone adapters and burning them out.
    Apple started detecting their use and refusing to power up to protect the device.

    Anyway... run some numbers and remember:

    Power (watts) = Current (Amps) X Voltage

    FUTURE PROOFING POWER HUB NEEDS FOR MANY DEVICES:

    USB Type-C alone can support up to 5 volts at 3 amps (15 W), while USB Type-C with USB Power Delivery (PD) allows the ecosystem to support several power levels up to a maximum of 20 volts at 5 amps (100 W).

    That's a huge boost from USB power levels ranging from the original 5 volts at 100 milliamps (.5 Watts) up to 20 volts at 5 amps (100 Watts).

    Busses of all types can connect devices, apps, commuters but they are designed with maximum limitations.

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