PSA: Don't update to iOS 12.4 if you use apps in AB output slot or IAA apps that use the mic.
https://forum.audiob.us/discussion/34030/urgent-psa-hold-off-updating-to-ios-12-4-if-you-use-apps-in-output-slot-in-audiobus

Nanostudio 2 update

1246733

Comments

  • @anickt said:

    I agree it wasn’t ideal. Looks like it’s been updated significantly.

    https://forum.audiob.us/uploads/editor/4w/taw7y9c1khfw.png

    Yeah, it looks a lot cleaner and more manageable :)

    It will be interesting to check NS2 out for sure when it finally drops and in particular the sampling work-flow.
    I'm an 'old school' sampling & synthesis person and if NS2 nails that I'll be a happy camper for sure!

    I'd be happy with a single sample, basic trim, normalise, fade in/out, a few mods (envelopes, lfos and other performance parmeters) routable to any parameter. A filter and a few alternate pitch-interpolation algorithms could be neat. Bonuses would be re-arranging the processing blocks (ie. for example apply bit-reduction prior to filtering or pitch interpolation or maybe even use two samples together and let one process the other (for ring-mod, x-mod etc). Then again I can do those things in SunVox when needed...

  • @Samu said:
    Worst example on how to not do preset management is the Roland JD-Xi :D

    JD-Xi manages sounds inside Programs which consist of 4 tracks (Digital Synth 1 & 2, Analog Synth and Drums), Effects, etc. You could try an editor like JD-Xi Manager or Patch Base app to see if they allow to copy paste tracks from one program to another or use Finder to copy/paste individual files while connected to the synth.

    I'm a big fan of 80's and early of 90's and Hi-NRG and love the DJ-style features in JD-Xi.

    Roland JD-Xi - songs from the 80's demo - Part 1
    (I liked the Terminator signature tune in this one at 2:43)

    Roland JD-Xi - songs from the 80's demo - Part 2
    (I liked the Broken Wings in this one at 2:08)

    Time

    Visitors

    Day of the Dead - The Dead Walk

  • @MobileMusic said:

    @Samu said:
    Worst example on how to not do preset management is the Roland JD-Xi :D

    JD-Xi manages sounds inside Programs which consist of 4 tracks (Digital Synth 1 & 2, Analog Synth and Drums), Effects, etc. You could try an editor like JD-Xi Manager or Patch Base app to see if they allow to copy paste tracks from one program to another or use Finder to copy/paste individual files while connected to the synth.

    I'm aware of that and it leads to crazy patch duplication. It's the same 'issue' with for example the Electribe 2 where the presets are locked inside patterns and it's a real pita to copy a part from one pattern to another.
    (It's problematic especially of switching between patterns/programs and wanting to make changes to sounds that are present in multiple patterns/programs).

    Sure presets on the JD-Xi can be copied but in many cases I'd prefer the old-school 'link to patch'(like the access to the the 'factory patches') In the case of the JD-Xi there is no way to save presets to the 'global bank' similar to the factory patches which are easily accessible from any 'program'.

    I'm a big fan of 80's and early of 90's and Hi-NRG and love the DJ-style features in JD-Xi.

    Me too, there's no faulting the JD-Xi when it comes to sounds but the 'interface' is not for me (and thus I have not bought it). I just can't cope with it especially since it needs an alternate front-plate to even be readable (UI nightmare with the dark red on black and tiny fonts to boot).

    Thankfully I do not have hardware GAS, apps are another thing...

  • @anickt said:

    @Samu said:

    @anickt said:

    In NS1 you did have the choice to save Eden patches globally or with the project. Same with samples. Not sure what you’re saying here.

    It was the Eden 'bank' system. Some of the banks were available globally some tied to the active project.
    I never properly managed to import sound banks with samples into Eden either where it 'just worked' and always got these 'missing samples' and yada yada. I still have NS1 installed on my desktop though...

    I agree it wasn’t ideal. Looks like it’s been updated significantly.

    https://forum.audiob.us/uploads/editor/4w/taw7y9c1khfw.png

    Oooh. Not helping self-regulating-hype-internal-hotness-scale-perceptor Nurse.

  • @Samu said:
    It was the Eden 'bank' system. Some of the banks were available globally some tied to the active project.
    I never properly managed to import sound banks with samples into Eden either where it 'just worked' and always got these 'missing samples' and yada yada. I still have NS1 installed on my desktop though...

    Depending upon the version, NS1 had global banks A-G and 1 project bank called bank P. You never need to use bank P if you never change banks A-G. To make sure any presets used in a project were not inadvertantly changed by later tweaks to the global banks it was just a wise move to save the presets to bank P as they would be saved with the project and not be changed 6 mo later when a gobal preset is tweaked.

    The problem with samples was in the file structure of how they were saved. The samples need to be in a root folder that all presets in any bank can easily find. The problem was when samples were saved to the P bank only - if the project files are later moved to a different location then the global banks couldn’t find the needed sample. This situation was avoided by loading samples into a root folder that all banks could find.

  • @Slam_Cut said:

    The problem with samples was in the file structure of how they were saved. The samples need to be in a root folder that all presets in any bank can easily find. The problem was when samples were saved to the P bank only - if the project files are later moved to a different location then the global banks couldn’t find the needed sample. This situation was avoided by loading samples into a root folder that all banks could find.

    Ok, I only have the desktop version left since I'm on iOS12 Air 2 but the folder-structure is about the same for that.
    At the 'root level' there is the Instruments folder (with /Instruments/Eden/ and the *. bnk files) and there's also the 'User' folder with '/User/Samples/Eden Factory/''.

    Back in the days when I still had in on my iPad I put the files 'everywhere' where I thought they would make sense but no go. (Like copy the *.bnk files to /Instruments/Eden/ (that worked, the presets popped up if I added proper bank name to them A,B,C etc) and then tried to copy the samples to /User/Samples/Eden Factory/ but from there the presets that showed up could not find the samples?! I finally gave up since I tried most of the 'logical' places for them.(It would have helped if the app 'hinted' where it expected the samples to be found at but nope). I tried to with both 'Nano Sync' app and 'iFunBox' but it made no difference...

    Oh well, I presume NS2 has undergone rigorous testing before it get's released but I would not be surprised if I bump into issues with it as well ;)

  • @CRAKROX said:
    I think perhaps people who weren’t there at the time probably just don’t get how amazing NS1 was at the time. To my memory it was incredibly stable whilst being at the bleeding edge of what was available on iOS at the time.
    Now if NS2 is like my memory of the original it will do everything promised on the box and hopefully be pretty much bug free.

    I don't think NS2 could possibly be like our collective initial memory of the original — at least not for those of us who got it when it came out (ish). Because, like you said, opening NS on your iPhone at that point felt like you were just handed Syncalvier when everything else you'd tried up to that point was a casiotone.

  • @Samu said:
    Sure presets on the JD-Xi can be copied but in many cases I'd prefer the old-school 'link to patch'(like the access to the the 'factory patches') In the case of the JD-Xi there is no way to save presets to the 'global bank' similar to the factory patches which are easily accessible from any 'program'.

    The old school synths I used in or from the 80s had a fixed set of slots. If you wanted to tweak a patch a little for a different song, you either overwrote the slot (changing it for both songs) or saved the tweaked version into a new slot. This is the way NS1 works.

    It adds two niceties on top of that.

    The first is the project bank (J?). This way you can save your tweaked versions of patches that you know you only really want for a given project to that bank and not potentially mess up a global slot.

    The second works more like the old "dump the patch parameters as sysex to the top of your Voyetra DOS sequencer track and have then sent out to the synth on playback." But without all the headaches. :) That's the thing you were talking about earlier where if you tweak some global preset but don't save it, it will recall the tweaked state when you open the project next time. And it doesn't mess with the actual global preset in case you were using it in another project.

    For me, this is best of all worlds.

    The pain in the ass part of NS1 you were getting at was (is) importing third party preset packs because those could only be loaded/shared via a project's project bank. And you can't load/import a preset from one project bank into another project. You'd have to load the preset pack project and then save the preset into one of the global banks to make it available to other projects. Not fun. Looking at that new preset screenshot and knowing IAP patches are a part of the plan, I think it would be safe to speculate that importing third party patches is solved.

  • edited September 2018

    @syrupcore said:

    @CRAKROX said:
    I think perhaps people who weren’t there at the time probably just don’t get how amazing NS1 was at the time. To my memory it was incredibly stable whilst being at the bleeding edge of what was available on iOS at the time.
    Now if NS2 is like my memory of the original it will do everything promised on the box and hopefully be pretty much bug free.

    I don't think NS2 could possibly be like our collective initial memory of the original — at least not for those of us who got it when it came out (ish). Because, like you said, opening NS on your iPhone at that point felt like you were just handed Syncalvier when everything else you'd tried up to that point was a casiotone.

    I got Nanostudio around six years ago but never got into it as I was pretty myopic about my desktop audio chopper process, which I did eventually expand on in iOS, eventually getting more into synths etc. I can respect the roots but for me it is more about a seasoned dev taking another swing with the iOS bat. The bar has been raised on iOS in general so I am super curious how it works out.

  • @AudioGus said:

    @syrupcore said:

    @CRAKROX said:
    I think perhaps people who weren’t there at the time probably just don’t get how amazing NS1 was at the time. To my memory it was incredibly stable whilst being at the bleeding edge of what was available on iOS at the time.
    Now if NS2 is like my memory of the original it will do everything promised on the box and hopefully be pretty much bug free.

    I don't think NS2 could possibly be like our collective initial memory of the original — at least not for those of us who got it when it came out (ish). Because, like you said, opening NS on your iPhone at that point felt like you were just handed Syncalvier when everything else you'd tried up to that point was a casiotone.

    I got Nanostudio around six years ago but never got into it as I was pretty myopic about my desktop audio chopper process, which I did eventually expand on in iOS, eventually getting more into synths etc. I can respect the roots but for me it is more about a seasoned dev taking another swing with the iOS bat. The bar has been raised on iOS in general so I am super curious how it works out.

    I think blip interactive is fully aware of how much the bar has been raised and that is the reason why he has taken so long to develop his second app

    It especially explains why he has delayed release by almost a year

    I suggest that NS2 itself will raise the bar much higher

    It will not need AUV3 as obsidian synth is exceptional, yet he has included AUV3 protocol to appeal to those who want to use other apps within it

    It will not need sample import as it ships with a rather large amount of decent samples anyway, yet it will include sample import

    Blip is a serious dev who doesn’t release app after app, he only made one app and that made him a lot of cash cause he did it right and ns1 did raise the bar back in 2010

    Prior to that, nothing came close to it really

  • @syrupcore said:

    The pain in the ass part of NS1 you were getting at was (is) importing third party preset packs because those could only be loaded/shared via a project's project bank. And you can't load/import a preset from one project bank into another project. You'd have to load the preset pack project and then save the preset into one of the global banks to make it available to other projects. Not fun. Looking at that new preset screenshot and knowing IAP patches are a part of the plan, I think it would be safe to speculate that importing third party patches is solved.

    Bingo! And I'm looking forward to NS2 when it drops :)

    Ideal for me would be a simple, record/select a sample, normalise & trim it and off to sequencing with it and in case it's needed add some modulation to it, filters, envelopes effects etc. but the 'path' from sampling to sequencing should be very straight forward. (renaming & saving samples etc. should not interrupt the flow).

    If I decide the project goes nowhere, I'll just create a new 'session' and the previous one including recordings should vanish without need to do 'house-keeping'. Naturally it should keep a 'back up' if the app would crash or when I decide to return to the app after hiding/closing it.(ie. restore last session).

    Since very little has 'leaked' about NS2's features I do hope it will include seamless support for multi-input&output interfaces and include both mono & stereo sampling with input selection and monitoring and maybe even alternate interpolation modes for it's pitch-shifting/tuning and maybe even adaptive over-sampling :)
    (I'm too 'attached' to Renoise).

  • @mindscaper said:

    @AudioGus said:

    @syrupcore said:

    @CRAKROX said:
    I think perhaps people who weren’t there at the time probably just don’t get how amazing NS1 was at the time. To my memory it was incredibly stable whilst being at the bleeding edge of what was available on iOS at the time.
    Now if NS2 is like my memory of the original it will do everything promised on the box and hopefully be pretty much bug free.

    I don't think NS2 could possibly be like our collective initial memory of the original — at least not for those of us who got it when it came out (ish). Because, like you said, opening NS on your iPhone at that point felt like you were just handed Syncalvier when everything else you'd tried up to that point was a casiotone.

    I got Nanostudio around six years ago but never got into it as I was pretty myopic about my desktop audio chopper process, which I did eventually expand on in iOS, eventually getting more into synths etc. I can respect the roots but for me it is more about a seasoned dev taking another swing with the iOS bat. The bar has been raised on iOS in general so I am super curious how it works out.

    I think blip interactive is fully aware of how much the bar has been raised and that is the reason why he has taken so long to develop his second app

    It especially explains why he has delayed release by almost a year

    I suggest that NS2 itself will raise the bar much higher

    It will not need AUV3 as obsidian synth is exceptional, yet he has included AUV3 protocol to appeal to those who want to use other apps within it

    It will not need sample import as it ships with a rather large amount of decent samples anyway, yet it will include sample import

    Blip is a serious dev who doesn’t release app after app, he only made one app and that made him a lot of cash cause he did it right and ns1 did raise the bar back in 2010

    Prior to that, nothing came close to it really

    I think NS2 will address most if not all of the shortcomings of the current selection of DAW’s for many users. I expect so for myself.

  • Has there been any mention of timestretch?

  • @anickt said:

    @mindscaper said:

    @AudioGus said:

    @syrupcore said:

    @CRAKROX said:
    I think perhaps people who weren’t there at the time probably just don’t get how amazing NS1 was at the time. To my memory it was incredibly stable whilst being at the bleeding edge of what was available on iOS at the time.
    Now if NS2 is like my memory of the original it will do everything promised on the box and hopefully be pretty much bug free.

    I don't think NS2 could possibly be like our collective initial memory of the original — at least not for those of us who got it when it came out (ish). Because, like you said, opening NS on your iPhone at that point felt like you were just handed Syncalvier when everything else you'd tried up to that point was a casiotone.

    I got Nanostudio around six years ago but never got into it as I was pretty myopic about my desktop audio chopper process, which I did eventually expand on in iOS, eventually getting more into synths etc. I can respect the roots but for me it is more about a seasoned dev taking another swing with the iOS bat. The bar has been raised on iOS in general so I am super curious how it works out.

    I think blip interactive is fully aware of how much the bar has been raised and that is the reason why he has taken so long to develop his second app

    It especially explains why he has delayed release by almost a year

    I suggest that NS2 itself will raise the bar much higher

    It will not need AUV3 as obsidian synth is exceptional, yet he has included AUV3 protocol to appeal to those who want to use other apps within it

    It will not need sample import as it ships with a rather large amount of decent samples anyway, yet it will include sample import

    Blip is a serious dev who doesn’t release app after app, he only made one app and that made him a lot of cash cause he did it right and ns1 did raise the bar back in 2010

    Prior to that, nothing came close to it really

    I think NS2 will address most if not all of the shortcomings of the current selection of DAW’s for many users. I expect so for myself.

    Well said

  • @Eclipxe said:
    Has there been any mention of timestretch?

    I’d expect this feature in the sample editor 100 percent

  • @Samu said:
    Ideal for me would be a simple, record/select a sample, normalise & trim it and off to sequencing with it and in case it's needed add some modulation to it, filters, envelopes effects etc. but the 'path' from sampling to sequencing should be very straight forward. (renaming & saving samples etc. should not interrupt the flow).

    Other than the need to name it, think this is pretty much the way NS1 works, no? Sample, edit+save, tweak away with all of the synthesis bits.

    I like the idea of ephemeral sampling where if you decide you don't need it—and don't save the project—it just goes away. Doesn't seem very Matt-like though. Part of the 'Just Works' appeal of NS would seem to necessitate not allowing for that sort of thing so that users don't get confused about what happened to their sample if they made a mistake or the machine's battery dies or, god forbid, a crash... Maybe samples could be auto-named based on the date/time and/or project name or something though? Would still require the housekeeping part but would keep cover for crashes/mistakes and could grease the 'path' between sampling and sequencing a bit.

  • @mindscaper said:

    @AudioGus said:

    @syrupcore said:

    @CRAKROX said:
    I think perhaps people who weren’t there at the time probably just don’t get how amazing NS1 was at the time. To my memory it was incredibly stable whilst being at the bleeding edge of what was available on iOS at the time.
    Now if NS2 is like my memory of the original it will do everything promised on the box and hopefully be pretty much bug free.

    I don't think NS2 could possibly be like our collective initial memory of the original — at least not for those of us who got it when it came out (ish). Because, like you said, opening NS on your iPhone at that point felt like you were just handed Syncalvier when everything else you'd tried up to that point was a casiotone.

    I got Nanostudio around six years ago but never got into it as I was pretty myopic about my desktop audio chopper process, which I did eventually expand on in iOS, eventually getting more into synths etc. I can respect the roots but for me it is more about a seasoned dev taking another swing with the iOS bat. The bar has been raised on iOS in general so I am super curious how it works out.

    I think blip interactive is fully aware of how much the bar has been raised and that is the reason why he has taken so long to develop his second app

    It especially explains why he has delayed release by almost a year

    I suggest that NS2 itself will raise the bar much higher

    It will not need AUV3 as obsidian synth is exceptional, yet he has included AUV3 protocol to appeal to those who want to use other apps within it

    It will not need sample import as it ships with a rather large amount of decent samples anyway, yet it will include sample import

    Blip is a serious dev who doesn’t release app after app, he only made one app and that made him a lot of cash cause he did it right and ns1 did raise the bar back in 2010

    Prior to that, nothing came close to it really

    I don't disagree! Just saying I don't think it's possible for any music app these days to represent the leap from Casiotones to Synclaviers in the way NS1 seemed to when it was released. That is, the difference between NS1 and the second best music app I had on my phone in 2010 will likely feel far greater than the difference between NS2 and the second best music app I have on my phone today. They've all had a chance to learn from NS1, obviously. :)

  • @mindscaper said:

    @AudioGus said:

    @syrupcore said:

    @CRAKROX said:
    I think perhaps people who weren’t there at the time probably just don’t get how amazing NS1 was at the time. To my memory it was incredibly stable whilst being at the bleeding edge of what was available on iOS at the time.
    Now if NS2 is like my memory of the original it will do everything promised on the box and hopefully be pretty much bug free.

    I don't think NS2 could possibly be like our collective initial memory of the original — at least not for those of us who got it when it came out (ish). Because, like you said, opening NS on your iPhone at that point felt like you were just handed Syncalvier when everything else you'd tried up to that point was a casiotone.

    I got Nanostudio around six years ago but never got into it as I was pretty myopic about my desktop audio chopper process, which I did eventually expand on in iOS, eventually getting more into synths etc. I can respect the roots but for me it is more about a seasoned dev taking another swing with the iOS bat. The bar has been raised on iOS in general so I am super curious how it works out.

    I think blip interactive is fully aware of how much the bar has been raised and that is the reason why he has taken so long to develop his second app

    What I meant by 'the bar has been raised on iOS in general so I am super curious how it works out' means I am curious which areas it will meet the bar and in which areas it will surpass it. No app does it all. I have no doubt that it will reflect the general bar raising of the platform and be a solid product. However, the personal, minor dice roll is whether or not it is raised in the areas / ways that specifically matter to me. It is not like it is going to cost a ton so I am going to get it just to satisfy my curiosity and support a cool dev. In the end I may or may not end up using it a lot. If i don't, no big deal, no harm, no foul, just another payment on the iOS subscription. ;)

  • @syrupcore said:

    @mindscaper said:

    @AudioGus said:

    @syrupcore said:

    @CRAKROX said:
    I think perhaps people who weren’t there at the time probably just don’t get how amazing NS1 was at the time. To my memory it was incredibly stable whilst being at the bleeding edge of what was available on iOS at the time.
    Now if NS2 is like my memory of the original it will do everything promised on the box and hopefully be pretty much bug free.

    I don't think NS2 could possibly be like our collective initial memory of the original — at least not for those of us who got it when it came out (ish). Because, like you said, opening NS on your iPhone at that point felt like you were just handed Syncalvier when everything else you'd tried up to that point was a casiotone.

    I got Nanostudio around six years ago but never got into it as I was pretty myopic about my desktop audio chopper process, which I did eventually expand on in iOS, eventually getting more into synths etc. I can respect the roots but for me it is more about a seasoned dev taking another swing with the iOS bat. The bar has been raised on iOS in general so I am super curious how it works out.

    I think blip interactive is fully aware of how much the bar has been raised and that is the reason why he has taken so long to develop his second app

    It especially explains why he has delayed release by almost a year

    I suggest that NS2 itself will raise the bar much higher

    It will not need AUV3 as obsidian synth is exceptional, yet he has included AUV3 protocol to appeal to those who want to use other apps within it

    It will not need sample import as it ships with a rather large amount of decent samples anyway, yet it will include sample import

    Blip is a serious dev who doesn’t release app after app, he only made one app and that made him a lot of cash cause he did it right and ns1 did raise the bar back in 2010

    Prior to that, nothing came close to it really

    I don't disagree! Just saying I don't think it's possible for any music app these days to represent the leap from Casiotones to Synclaviers in the way NS1 seemed to when it was released. That is, the difference between NS1 and the second best music app I had on my phone in 2010 will likely feel far greater than the difference between NS2 and the second best music app I have on my phone today. They've all had a chance to learn from NS1, obviously. :)

    I hear U syrupcore

    Prior to ns1 there was a build up and expectation of “when will we finally be able to create a fully fledged track on our device?”

    Ns1 fulfilled that need for a long time even though we had to acp stuff into it

    Ahh the memories lol

    Then things just developed gradually from there with ab and more complex synths and waaay too many fx apps and cheaper synths etc

    So the leap, I agree when NS2 comes out won’t have such an impact as before

    It will simply be another ( but wiser) choice for those wanting a more complete experience

  • @AudioGus said:

    @mindscaper said:

    @AudioGus said:

    @syrupcore said:

    @CRAKROX said:
    I think perhaps people who weren’t there at the time probably just don’t get how amazing NS1 was at the time. To my memory it was incredibly stable whilst being at the bleeding edge of what was available on iOS at the time.
    Now if NS2 is like my memory of the original it will do everything promised on the box and hopefully be pretty much bug free.

    I don't think NS2 could possibly be like our collective initial memory of the original — at least not for those of us who got it when it came out (ish). Because, like you said, opening NS on your iPhone at that point felt like you were just handed Syncalvier when everything else you'd tried up to that point was a casiotone.

    I got Nanostudio around six years ago but never got into it as I was pretty myopic about my desktop audio chopper process, which I did eventually expand on in iOS, eventually getting more into synths etc. I can respect the roots but for me it is more about a seasoned dev taking another swing with the iOS bat. The bar has been raised on iOS in general so I am super curious how it works out.

    I think blip interactive is fully aware of how much the bar has been raised and that is the reason why he has taken so long to develop his second app

    What I meant by 'the bar has been raised on iOS in general so I am super curious how it works out' means I am curious which areas it will meet the bar and in which areas it will surpass it. No app does it all. I have no doubt that it will reflect the general bar raising of the platform and be a solid product. However, the personal, minor dice roll is whether or not it is raised in the areas / ways that specifically matter to me. It is not like it is going to cost a ton so I am going to get it just to satisfy my curiosity and support a cool dev. In the end I may or may not end up using it a lot. If i don't, no big deal, no harm, no foul, just another payment on the iOS subscription. ;)

    That’s the point mate- no app at present does it all, and that really sucks and this has cost appaholics likely thousands of pounds or dollars or yen, trying to get a satisfying and stable set up

    Knowing this, some devs keep releasing pieces of the puzzle and we are left with tons of pieces that either fit or don’t

    Fun for some, not for all

    Ns1 did it all at the time, then we realised things could be better

    NS2 seems to be another solution for the present day then maybe in a year or two we may outgrow that

    Who knows

    The journey is interesting on iOS for sure and I’ll never go back to desktop lol

  • edited September 2018

    @mindscaper said:

    @AudioGus said:

    @mindscaper said:

    @AudioGus said:

    @syrupcore said:

    @CRAKROX said:
    I think perhaps people who weren’t there at the time probably just don’t get how amazing NS1 was at the time. To my memory it was incredibly stable whilst being at the bleeding edge of what was available on iOS at the time.
    Now if NS2 is like my memory of the original it will do everything promised on the box and hopefully be pretty much bug free.

    I don't think NS2 could possibly be like our collective initial memory of the original — at least not for those of us who got it when it came out (ish). Because, like you said, opening NS on your iPhone at that point felt like you were just handed Syncalvier when everything else you'd tried up to that point was a casiotone.

    I got Nanostudio around six years ago but never got into it as I was pretty myopic about my desktop audio chopper process, which I did eventually expand on in iOS, eventually getting more into synths etc. I can respect the roots but for me it is more about a seasoned dev taking another swing with the iOS bat. The bar has been raised on iOS in general so I am super curious how it works out.

    I think blip interactive is fully aware of how much the bar has been raised and that is the reason why he has taken so long to develop his second app

    What I meant by 'the bar has been raised on iOS in general so I am super curious how it works out' means I am curious which areas it will meet the bar and in which areas it will surpass it. No app does it all. I have no doubt that it will reflect the general bar raising of the platform and be a solid product. However, the personal, minor dice roll is whether or not it is raised in the areas / ways that specifically matter to me. It is not like it is going to cost a ton so I am going to get it just to satisfy my curiosity and support a cool dev. In the end I may or may not end up using it a lot. If i don't, no big deal, no harm, no foul, just another payment on the iOS subscription. ;)

    That’s the point mate- no app at present does it all, and that really sucks

    No app ever will on any platform unless we are talking the Matrix.

  • @mindscaper said:

    @anickt said:

    @mindscaper said:

    @AudioGus said:

    @syrupcore said:

    @CRAKROX said:
    I think perhaps people who weren’t there at the time probably just don’t get how amazing NS1 was at the time. To my memory it was incredibly stable whilst being at the bleeding edge of what was available on iOS at the time.
    Now if NS2 is like my memory of the original it will do everything promised on the box and hopefully be pretty much bug free.

    I don't think NS2 could possibly be like our collective initial memory of the original — at least not for those of us who got it when it came out (ish). Because, like you said, opening NS on your iPhone at that point felt like you were just handed Syncalvier when everything else you'd tried up to that point was a casiotone.

    I got Nanostudio around six years ago but never got into it as I was pretty myopic about my desktop audio chopper process, which I did eventually expand on in iOS, eventually getting more into synths etc. I can respect the roots but for me it is more about a seasoned dev taking another swing with the iOS bat. The bar has been raised on iOS in general so I am super curious how it works out.

    I think blip interactive is fully aware of how much the bar has been raised and that is the reason why he has taken so long to develop his second app

    It especially explains why he has delayed release by almost a year

    I suggest that NS2 itself will raise the bar much higher

    It will not need AUV3 as obsidian synth is exceptional, yet he has included AUV3 protocol to appeal to those who want to use other apps within it

    It will not need sample import as it ships with a rather large amount of decent samples anyway, yet it will include sample import

    Blip is a serious dev who doesn’t release app after app, he only made one app and that made him a lot of cash cause he did it right and ns1 did raise the bar back in 2010

    Prior to that, nothing came close to it really

    I think NS2 will address most if not all of the shortcomings of the current selection of DAW’s for many users. I expect so for myself.

    Well said

    Until the inevitable list of "omissions" and backlash. BM3 is a giant piece of impressive kit that most got for less than $30 or free! And yet...

  • wimwim
    edited September 2018

    And then the dopes who bitch about all the “hype” as if the developer pumped it up himself. I kinda wish everyone would cool it just a little.

  • @lukesleepwalker said:

    @mindscaper said:

    @anickt said:

    @mindscaper said:

    @AudioGus said:

    @syrupcore said:

    @CRAKROX said:
    I think perhaps people who weren’t there at the time probably just don’t get how amazing NS1 was at the time. To my memory it was incredibly stable whilst being at the bleeding edge of what was available on iOS at the time.
    Now if NS2 is like my memory of the original it will do everything promised on the box and hopefully be pretty much bug free.

    I don't think NS2 could possibly be like our collective initial memory of the original — at least not for those of us who got it when it came out (ish). Because, like you said, opening NS on your iPhone at that point felt like you were just handed Syncalvier when everything else you'd tried up to that point was a casiotone.

    I got Nanostudio around six years ago but never got into it as I was pretty myopic about my desktop audio chopper process, which I did eventually expand on in iOS, eventually getting more into synths etc. I can respect the roots but for me it is more about a seasoned dev taking another swing with the iOS bat. The bar has been raised on iOS in general so I am super curious how it works out.

    I think blip interactive is fully aware of how much the bar has been raised and that is the reason why he has taken so long to develop his second app

    It especially explains why he has delayed release by almost a year

    I suggest that NS2 itself will raise the bar much higher

    It will not need AUV3 as obsidian synth is exceptional, yet he has included AUV3 protocol to appeal to those who want to use other apps within it

    It will not need sample import as it ships with a rather large amount of decent samples anyway, yet it will include sample import

    Blip is a serious dev who doesn’t release app after app, he only made one app and that made him a lot of cash cause he did it right and ns1 did raise the bar back in 2010

    Prior to that, nothing came close to it really

    I think NS2 will address most if not all of the shortcomings of the current selection of DAW’s for many users. I expect so for myself.

    Well said

    Until the inevitable list of "omissions" and backlash. BM3 is a giant piece of impressive kit that most got for less than $30 or free! And yet...

    Goodyear sidles up, falls into stride: "Keep moving Sergeant. Stick to one side. No need to poke that bear while we're still deep in the wood..."

    :)

  • @lukesleepwalker said:

    @mindscaper said:

    @anickt said:

    @mindscaper said:

    @AudioGus said:

    @syrupcore said:

    @CRAKROX said:
    I think perhaps people who weren’t there at the time probably just don’t get how amazing NS1 was at the time. To my memory it was incredibly stable whilst being at the bleeding edge of what was available on iOS at the time.
    Now if NS2 is like my memory of the original it will do everything promised on the box and hopefully be pretty much bug free.

    I don't think NS2 could possibly be like our collective initial memory of the original — at least not for those of us who got it when it came out (ish). Because, like you said, opening NS on your iPhone at that point felt like you were just handed Syncalvier when everything else you'd tried up to that point was a casiotone.

    I got Nanostudio around six years ago but never got into it as I was pretty myopic about my desktop audio chopper process, which I did eventually expand on in iOS, eventually getting more into synths etc. I can respect the roots but for me it is more about a seasoned dev taking another swing with the iOS bat. The bar has been raised on iOS in general so I am super curious how it works out.

    I think blip interactive is fully aware of how much the bar has been raised and that is the reason why he has taken so long to develop his second app

    It especially explains why he has delayed release by almost a year

    I suggest that NS2 itself will raise the bar much higher

    It will not need AUV3 as obsidian synth is exceptional, yet he has included AUV3 protocol to appeal to those who want to use other apps within it

    It will not need sample import as it ships with a rather large amount of decent samples anyway, yet it will include sample import

    Blip is a serious dev who doesn’t release app after app, he only made one app and that made him a lot of cash cause he did it right and ns1 did raise the bar back in 2010

    Prior to that, nothing came close to it really

    I think NS2 will address most if not all of the shortcomings of the current selection of DAW’s for many users. I expect so for myself.

    Well said

    Until the inevitable list of "omissions" and backlash. BM3 is a giant piece of impressive kit that most got for less than $30 or free! And yet...

    exactly ...and yet AU paramter 1 still can’t be automated! I know! Wink. ;). Ass. ( | )

  • @JohnnyGoodyear said:

    @lukesleepwalker said:

    @mindscaper said:

    @anickt said:

    @mindscaper said:

    @AudioGus said:

    @syrupcore said:

    @CRAKROX said:
    I think perhaps people who weren’t there at the time probably just don’t get how amazing NS1 was at the time. To my memory it was incredibly stable whilst being at the bleeding edge of what was available on iOS at the time.
    Now if NS2 is like my memory of the original it will do everything promised on the box and hopefully be pretty much bug free.

    I don't think NS2 could possibly be like our collective initial memory of the original — at least not for those of us who got it when it came out (ish). Because, like you said, opening NS on your iPhone at that point felt like you were just handed Syncalvier when everything else you'd tried up to that point was a casiotone.

    I got Nanostudio around six years ago but never got into it as I was pretty myopic about my desktop audio chopper process, which I did eventually expand on in iOS, eventually getting more into synths etc. I can respect the roots but for me it is more about a seasoned dev taking another swing with the iOS bat. The bar has been raised on iOS in general so I am super curious how it works out.

    I think blip interactive is fully aware of how much the bar has been raised and that is the reason why he has taken so long to develop his second app

    It especially explains why he has delayed release by almost a year

    I suggest that NS2 itself will raise the bar much higher

    It will not need AUV3 as obsidian synth is exceptional, yet he has included AUV3 protocol to appeal to those who want to use other apps within it

    It will not need sample import as it ships with a rather large amount of decent samples anyway, yet it will include sample import

    Blip is a serious dev who doesn’t release app after app, he only made one app and that made him a lot of cash cause he did it right and ns1 did raise the bar back in 2010

    Prior to that, nothing came close to it really

    I think NS2 will address most if not all of the shortcomings of the current selection of DAW’s for many users. I expect so for myself.

    Well said

    Until the inevitable list of "omissions" and backlash. BM3 is a giant piece of impressive kit that most got for less than $30 or free! And yet...

    Goodyear sidles up, falls into stride: "Keep moving Sergeant. Stick to one side. No need to poke that bear while we're still deep in the wood..."

    :)

    Ha, whatever gets you through the forest. I'm unduly grouchy today. The early fall is lovely, the creative juices are lactating with aplomb, the local sports teams pull through. And YET...

  • edited September 2018

    “Like copy the *.bnk files to /Instruments/Eden/ (that worked, the presets popped up if I added proper bank name to them A,B,C etc) and then tried to copy the samples to /User/Samples/Eden Factory/ but from there the presets that showed up could not find the samples?! I finally gave up since I tried most of the 'logical' places for them.(It would have helped if the app 'hinted' where it expected the samples to be found at but nope). I tried to with both 'Nano Sync' app and 'iFunBox' but it made no difference...”

    If I get your old problem, there is the need to save the preset from within Eden synth so that it sets a folder path to be used. The User can adjust that folder path. For example I saved all of my samples for presets into a folder called Presets. But there was a part of the saving process (I don’t have NS1 accessible at the moment so I’m not a precise as I should be) that was key to make sure if you moved samples to the Preset folder that you re-saved the preset so the folder path was clear to Eden. This caused a lot of confusion for people (including me). I don’t know how NS2 will work but I’d bet this sample folder path situation has been changed.

  • @lukesleepwalker said:

    @mindscaper said:

    @anickt said:

    @mindscaper said:

    @AudioGus said:

    @syrupcore said:

    @CRAKROX said:
    I think perhaps people who weren’t there at the time probably just don’t get how amazing NS1 was at the time. To my memory it was incredibly stable whilst being at the bleeding edge of what was available on iOS at the time.
    Now if NS2 is like my memory of the original it will do everything promised on the box and hopefully be pretty much bug free.

    I don't think NS2 could possibly be like our collective initial memory of the original — at least not for those of us who got it when it came out (ish). Because, like you said, opening NS on your iPhone at that point felt like you were just handed Syncalvier when everything else you'd tried up to that point was a casiotone.

    I got Nanostudio around six years ago but never got into it as I was pretty myopic about my desktop audio chopper process, which I did eventually expand on in iOS, eventually getting more into synths etc. I can respect the roots but for me it is more about a seasoned dev taking another swing with the iOS bat. The bar has been raised on iOS in general so I am super curious how it works out.

    I think blip interactive is fully aware of how much the bar has been raised and that is the reason why he has taken so long to develop his second app

    It especially explains why he has delayed release by almost a year

    I suggest that NS2 itself will raise the bar much higher

    It will not need AUV3 as obsidian synth is exceptional, yet he has included AUV3 protocol to appeal to those who want to use other apps within it

    It will not need sample import as it ships with a rather large amount of decent samples anyway, yet it will include sample import

    Blip is a serious dev who doesn’t release app after app, he only made one app and that made him a lot of cash cause he did it right and ns1 did raise the bar back in 2010

    Prior to that, nothing came close to it really

    I think NS2 will address most if not all of the shortcomings of the current selection of DAW’s for many users. I expect so for myself.

    Well said

    Until the inevitable list of "omissions" and backlash. BM3 is a giant piece of impressive kit that most got for less than $30 or free! And yet...

    BM3 is very powerful. But the workflow just doesn’t click with me. So a “giant piece of impressive kit” isn’t always the answer. :D

  • As usual, I disagree with everything syrupcore wrote!
    Oh, no wait! I actually agree....
    What syrupcore said!

    As many have pointed out, no app does it all, and this is a point that it would be wise to keep in mind for any new app that comes out. For me I just need a main app that I can focus my efforts into a workflow that works for me, bringing all he various apps together, either directly (AUv3) or indirectly (IAA & AB with work-arounds). In one way, all the specialized apps on the iOS platform allows us to focus on the tools we want, rather than be overwhelmed with a Desktop DAW that almost does it all but is too complex for the creativity to shine through. iOS music production is quite an interesting challenge, while also being a creative inspiraton.

  • @Slam_Cut said:
    As usual, I disagree with everything syrupcore wrote!
    Oh, no wait! I actually agree....
    What syrupcore said!

    As many have pointed out, no app does it all, and this is a point that it would be wise to keep in mind for any new app that comes out. For me I just need a main app that I can focus my efforts into a workflow that works for me, bringing all he various apps together, either directly (AUv3) or indirectly (IAA & AB with work-arounds). In one way, all the specialized apps on the iOS platform allows us to focus on the tools we want, rather than be overwhelmed with a Desktop DAW that almost does it all but is too complex for the creativity to shine through. iOS music production is quite an interesting challenge, while also being a creative inspiraton.

    No IAA in NS2 from what I recall reading on the NS forum.

This discussion has been closed.