Good Headphones For IOS Wanted! Which do you use? (Poll)

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Comments

  • @mAxjUlien said:

    @universe said:

    @ToMess said:
    For mixing and mastering you want open or semi open back headphones. Closed back headphones are for monitoring insteuments/vocals

    I’ve heard this but never understood why ?

    Sound stage is expanded with open back which better emulates studio monitors. Think Space to better hear things like reverb, panning, etc.

    Thanks

  • edited September 2018
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • edited September 2018

    @mAxjUlien said:

    @mannix said:
    And don't buy into the Audio Technica ATH 50 mx hype. Just read this review that I can fully support. And yes, I had these headphones too. The mids are really really awful don't buy them. But yes you should try them and compare them with ie your Beyer DT770 and you'll hear they are really shit.

    Review: Here's Why The Audio Technica ATH-M50X is a Terrible Headphone
    Explains also the trick of Audio Technica's clever marketing and why they are so hyped.
    https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/898207-heres-why-the-audio-technica-ath-m50x-is-a-terrible-headphone/

    Not saying dude is wrong but I certainly disagree...as does like...the whole world.lol. As with all links, opinions and revelations of opposition to years of expert audiophile review...consider the source. Who is this guy and wtf would anyone value his opinion over significantly more notable “experts” and successful people spanning decade?

    I can post links to the same views of Apple products pretty easily. Make em right? Yeah naw.

    Ever heard of the saying "the asymmetry of bullshit". It means if bullshit is produced by big sources you hardly can't refute it because it takes such an effort that most people don't even start to giving their opinions. Welcome to the social media :)
    The Audio Technica M50x is a perfect example of this. Promoted by the biggest tech blogs with an audience every audio magazine can dream of, you only find any serious critique when you start to dig very deep into google. These tech blogs are the perfect marktingtools nowadays. Anyway I talked also about my own experience with these cans. They are unusable if your're into serious music business.
    If we're talking about pricerange. The Sonys are in my eyes the best for that. But undeniable the Beyers are doing also a good job. With the others mentioned here I don't have any experience.
    And with "the whole world" disagreeing with me doesn't make my opinion not true. I adviced try before you buy. With the knowledge of the mids of the 50mx are not very good, you can focus on it and hear it for yourselves. Try before you buy and compare and don't just follow the so called mass opinions.

  • edited September 2018
    The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • @mAxjUlien said:

    @mannix said:

    @mAxjUlien said:

    @mannix said:
    And don't buy into the Audio Technica ATH 50 mx hype. Just read this review that I can fully support. And yes, I had these headphones too. The mids are really really awful don't buy them. But yes you should try them and compare them with ie your Beyer DT770 and you'll hear they are really shit.

    Review: Here's Why The Audio Technica ATH-M50X is a Terrible Headphone
    Explains also the trick of Audio Technica's clever marketing and why they are so hyped.
    https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/898207-heres-why-the-audio-technica-ath-m50x-is-a-terrible-headphone/

    Not saying dude is wrong but I certainly disagree...as does like...the whole world.lol. As with all links, opinions and revelations of opposition to years of expert audiophile review...consider the source. Who is this guy and wtf would anyone value his opinion over significantly more notable “experts” and successful people spanning decade?

    I can post links to the same views of Apple products pretty easily. Make em right? Yeah naw.

    Ever heard of the saying "the asymmetry of bullshit". It means if bullshit is produced by big sources you hardly can't refute it because it takes such an effort that most people don't even start to giving their opinions. Welcome to the social media :)
    The Audio Technica M50x is a perfect example of this. Promoted by the biggest tech blogs with an audience every audio magazine can dream of, you only find any serious critique when you start to dig very deep into google. These tech blogs are the perfect marktingtools nowadays. Anyway I talked also about my own experience with these cans. They are unusable if your're into serious music business.
    If we're talking about pricerange. The Sonys are in my eyes the best for that. But undeniable the Beyers are doing also a good job. With the others mentioned here I don't have any experience.
    And with "the whole world" disagreeing with me doesn't make my opinion not true. I adviced try before you buy. With the knowledge of the mids of the 50mx are not very good, you can focus on it and hear it for yourselves. Try before you buy and compare and don't just follow the so called mass opinions.

    Again...don’t disagree with the base of your adversion to group thought. I dig it actually. But...your personal experience with ATH differs from mine...and apparently...many here...AND...score of PROS I’ve worked with who’ve been very successful using ATH. So there’s that for personal experience vs the guy in the link you supplied that no one even knows has ever been successful at anything.

    You can dive deep into google and find an opposing view about anything including drinking pure water bro. You can find statistics and opinions to support whatever you like. See social, political discourse for how that shitshow works.lmfao.

    Ultimately...I agree with you in that one should use their own ears to decide. I tend to try and find where we agree so that we’re not wasting effort on being disagreeable. Deal?

    Agree!

  • The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • edited September 2018

    @mannix said:
    And don't buy into the Audio Technica ATH 50 mx hype. Just read this review that I can fully support. And yes, I had these headphones too. The mids are really really awful don't buy them. But yes you should try them and compare them with ie your Beyer DT770 and you'll hear they are really shit.

    Review: Here's Why The Audio Technica ATH-M50X is a Terrible Headphone
    Explains also the trick of Audio Technica's clever marketing and why they are so hyped.
    https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/898207-heres-why-the-audio-technica-ath-m50x-is-a-terrible-headphone/

    Thanks for that link... I have to admit, I assumed the m50x was great based on what I saw in Youtube reviews...

  • @universe said:

    @mAxjUlien said:

    @universe said:

    @ToMess said:
    For mixing and mastering you want open or semi open back headphones. Closed back headphones are for monitoring insteuments/vocals

    I’ve heard this but never understood why ?

    Sound stage is expanded with open back which better emulates studio monitors. Think Space to better hear things like reverb, panning, etc.

    Thanks

    That. Also closed back headphones tire your ears faster

  • @ToMess said:

    @universe said:

    @mAxjUlien said:

    @universe said:

    @ToMess said:
    For mixing and mastering you want open or semi open back headphones. Closed back headphones are for monitoring insteuments/vocals

    I’ve heard this but never understood why ?

    Sound stage is expanded with open back which better emulates studio monitors. Think Space to better hear things like reverb, panning, etc.

    Thanks

    That. Also closed back headphones tire your ears faster

    Ah ok. Though @AudioGus saus he found some headphones and experienced zero fatigue. I’m intrigued by those that he mentioned.

  • @supanorton said:

    @Iso said:

    @supanorton said:
    @chandroji
    I used the Focal Spirit Professionals for a few years, but the headband developed cracks, which was a pretty common problem. To their credit, Focal replaced them with another pair, which also developed the same cracks. Focal then sent me their newest closed back headphones, called Focal Listen Professionals. To my ears, they are very flat and detailed. They are also much more comfortable than the Professionals, fold up, and come with a nice travel case.

    Focal’s customer service has been absolutely incredible for me.

    Useful info about the Focal Spirit Professionals. They gave me a pair to use in GAK the other day & completely failed to mention any problems with them. Just checked Gearslutz & lots of posts about this problem on there. Did they fix the problem, or is it still an issue?

    Focal has discontinued the Spirtit Pros and replaced them with the Listen Pros. Totally different design. They appear to be more sturdy and durable than the Spirit Pros. Many users, including @richardyot have been using the Spirit Pros for years without issue.

    I’ve seen many forum threads about the cracks, and people claiming Focal refused to help. That was not my experience. They replaced two sets of headphones for me free of charge. I’m very pleased with the Focal Listen Pros.

    Exact same boat. Two pairs of cracked Spirit Pros and Sweetwater has just recently sent me a new pair of Listen Pros as a replacement. Much happier with this new design. And I’ve been using them with Sonarworks on my iMac through Logic. With that profile they are deadly accurate for mix duties. I read that Sonarworks were planning to release an iOS app. Not sure if that’s still happening but I feel it would be a major step for this platform in the headphone mixing and critical listening department.

  • edited September 2018

    @universe said:

    @ToMess said:

    @universe said:

    @mAxjUlien said:

    @universe said:

    @ToMess said:
    For mixing and mastering you want open or semi open back headphones. Closed back headphones are for monitoring insteuments/vocals

    I’ve heard this but never understood why ?

    Sound stage is expanded with open back which better emulates studio monitors. Think Space to better hear things like reverb, panning, etc.

    Thanks

    That. Also closed back headphones tire your ears faster

    Ah ok. Though @AudioGus saus he found some headphones and experienced zero fatigue. I’m intrigued by those that he mentioned.

    Fatigue is subjective and zero fatigue doesent exist. By design open back causes less of it

  • @ToMess said:

    @universe said:

    @ToMess said:

    @universe said:

    @mAxjUlien said:

    @universe said:

    @ToMess said:
    For mixing and mastering you want open or semi open back headphones. Closed back headphones are for monitoring insteuments/vocals

    I’ve heard this but never understood why ?

    Sound stage is expanded with open back which better emulates studio monitors. Think Space to better hear things like reverb, panning, etc.

    Thanks

    That. Also closed back headphones tire your ears faster

    Ah ok. Though @AudioGus saus he found some headphones and experienced zero fatigue. I’m intrigued by those that he mentioned.

    Fatigue is subjective. By design open back causes less of it

    I listen at pretty low volumes. Most ear fatique i ever experienced had almost everything to do with physical fit and not actual listening.

    But Yah if i were at home more i would absolutely use my open back AKG k702 headphones. Cant use them on the train or at work though so I just never got to know them. Wife uses them on the Roku now lol

  • @ToMess said:

    @universe said:

    @ToMess said:

    @universe said:

    @mAxjUlien said:

    @universe said:

    @ToMess said:
    For mixing and mastering you want open or semi open back headphones. Closed back headphones are for monitoring insteuments/vocals

    I’ve heard this but never understood why ?

    Sound stage is expanded with open back which better emulates studio monitors. Think Space to better hear things like reverb, panning, etc.

    Thanks

    That. Also closed back headphones tire your ears faster

    Ah ok. Though @AudioGus saus he found some headphones and experienced zero fatigue. I’m intrigued by those that he mentioned.

    Fatigue is subjective and zero fatigue doesent exist. By design open back causes less of it

    Btw, i never meant to imply or said that with these headphones i could never experience ear fatigue again just that I have no ear fatique anymore, meaning it is not an issue like it was before with other headphones that did not fit my head/ears as well. I am sure if I put in a solid six or eight hour day attentively mixing i would have it but most of my day is just casual listening with scattered bits of mixing sprinkled in.

  • @AudioGus said:

    @ToMess said:

    @universe said:

    @ToMess said:

    @universe said:

    @mAxjUlien said:

    @universe said:

    @ToMess said:
    For mixing and mastering you want open or semi open back headphones. Closed back headphones are for monitoring insteuments/vocals

    I’ve heard this but never understood why ?

    Sound stage is expanded with open back which better emulates studio monitors. Think Space to better hear things like reverb, panning, etc.

    Thanks

    That. Also closed back headphones tire your ears faster

    Ah ok. Though @AudioGus saus he found some headphones and experienced zero fatigue. I’m intrigued by those that he mentioned.

    Fatigue is subjective. By design open back causes less of it

    I listen at pretty low volumes. Most ear fatique i ever experienced had almost everything to do with physical fit and not actual listening.

    But Yah if i were at home more i would absolutely use my open back AKG k702 headphones. Cant use them on the train or at work though so I just never got to know them. Wife uses them on the Roku now lol

    Yea fatigue is a combination of both sound and fit. The thing is that closed back will create more low/high pressure on your ear drums when the element moves, as air cant escape as freely than with open back.

    I use akg 702 as well(can recommend them and other akg from same range) and that sort of headphones definitely are not for use in public transportation etc. Iphone/pads headphone out cant drive them as well as i would want to, but its like 95% there, usually max vol is right vol, but sometimes i want more. But i use them through interface. This is something to keep in mind tho. Open back with same impedance than closed, will likely have less output to your ears as the sound can freely escape all over

  • @ToMess said:

    @AudioGus said:

    @ToMess said:

    @universe said:

    @ToMess said:

    @universe said:

    @mAxjUlien said:

    @universe said:

    @ToMess said:
    For mixing and mastering you want open or semi open back headphones. Closed back headphones are for monitoring insteuments/vocals

    I’ve heard this but never understood why ?

    Sound stage is expanded with open back which better emulates studio monitors. Think Space to better hear things like reverb, panning, etc.

    Thanks

    That. Also closed back headphones tire your ears faster

    Ah ok. Though @AudioGus saus he found some headphones and experienced zero fatigue. I’m intrigued by those that he mentioned.

    Fatigue is subjective. By design open back causes less of it

    I listen at pretty low volumes. Most ear fatique i ever experienced had almost everything to do with physical fit and not actual listening.

    But Yah if i were at home more i would absolutely use my open back AKG k702 headphones. Cant use them on the train or at work though so I just never got to know them. Wife uses them on the Roku now lol

    Yea fatigue is a combination of both sound and fit. The thing is that closed back will create more low/high pressure on your ear drums when the element moves, as air cant escape as freely than with open back.

    I use akg 702 as well(can recommend them and other akg from same range) and that sort of headphones definitely are not for use in public transportation etc. Iphone/pads headphone out cant drive them as well as i would want to, but its like 95% there, usually max vol is right vol, but sometimes i want more. But i use them through interface. This is something to keep in mind tho. Open back with same impedance than closed, will likely have less output to your ears as the sound can freely escape all over

    What are your thoughts on the Sennheiser hd650? Open backs

  • I will try these because I need headphones both in and off studio!
    https://www.soundcore.com/products/variant/space-nc/A30210F1

  • If you want good and cheap check out this thread on head-fi.org 260 pages and counting
    https://www.head-fi.org/threads/chinese-asian-brand-info-thread-on-or-over-ear-headphones.822184/page-290

  • edited September 2018

    Unless you are going to get really expensive headphones, it's probably not going to be a flat response. For me, my old ears are so bad, it wouldn't matter. I can't hear high range anyway.

    If you can afford it, I recommend Sonarworks headphone calibration. They can take the profile of any of the major headphones and remove "unwanted coloration" Theoretically this balances the frequency response. You get it as a plugin to put in the master out of your DAW. You can also use it for all the sound that comes out of your computer. They have a free demo and they constantly have sales.

    They also sell a version for your studio that works with your speakers and room acoustics.

    I recognize this is not for people who do their final mix and mastering on their iPads or iPhones.

  • edited September 2018

    @Reid said:
    Unless you are going to get really expensive headphones, it's probably not going to be a flat response. For me, my old ears are so bad, it wouldn't matter. I can't hear high range anyway.

    If you can afford it, I recommend Sonarworks headphone calibration. They can take the profile of any of the major headphones and remove "unwanted coloration" Theoretically this balances the frequency response. You get it as a plugin to put in the master out of your DAW. You can also use it for all the sound that comes out of your computer. They have a free demo and they constantly have sales.

    They also sell a version for your studio that works with your speakers and room acoustics.

    I recognize this is not for people who do their final mix and mastering on their iPads or iPhones.

    Toneboosters has what I think is a similar one for cheaper as well, just a vst though...

    https://www.toneboosters.com/tb_morphit_v1.html

  • It would be cool if Sonarworks or IK or somebody would offer a version of this for iOS at an iOS price point.

    I will say that it does take some getting used to. Your headphones don't sound the way you're used to them sounding.

  • Have to agree the Sonly 7506's are workhorses. They sound great, have been consistent over the years, are used everywhere and aren't too expensive ( though they are a bear to get out of the box when they arrive!).

    They fold up well and the coiled cable is good for portable use.

    I always add a $20.00 set of leather ear pads which suit me much better.

    For trips / traveling I have a set of Pioneer Rayz earbuds which sport a Lightning connector and have a decent active EQ built in ... for those of us who have done a bit too much er ... music. Noise cancelling is good and they take up no space.

    Perfect for airplanes, trains, busses .... not final mixing... but no headphone is great for that (IMHO ).

  • Headphones sound different to different people. It’s a very subjective thing. You gotta try and see what works for you.

  • edited September 2018

    @Reid said:
    It would be cool if Sonarworks or IK or somebody would offer a version of this for iOS at an iOS price point.

    I will say that it does take some getting used to. Your headphones don't sound the way you're used to them sounding.

    Very interesting point. I did once search for the same type of app for iOS. But what I understood Apple doesn't let devs do this kind of apps for iOS. Has something to do with control. You can only build such apps for an individual app.

    @Reid and @AudioGus interesting to note Audio Evolution works close together with Toneboosters so I could see that they could come up with such a specific iap for the Audio Evolution app. Toneboosters has the software already as a VST they only have to port it. The VST for headphone profiles is btw called Morphit.

  • @brice said:

    @supanorton said:

    @Iso said:

    @supanorton said:
    @chandroji
    I used the Focal Spirit Professionals for a few years, but the headband developed cracks, which was a pretty common problem. To their credit, Focal replaced them with another pair, which also developed the same cracks. Focal then sent me their newest closed back headphones, called Focal Listen Professionals. To my ears, they are very flat and detailed. They are also much more comfortable than the Professionals, fold up, and come with a nice travel case.

    Focal’s customer service has been absolutely incredible for me.

    Useful info about the Focal Spirit Professionals. They gave me a pair to use in GAK the other day & completely failed to mention any problems with them. Just checked Gearslutz & lots of posts about this problem on there. Did they fix the problem, or is it still an issue?

    Focal has discontinued the Spirtit Pros and replaced them with the Listen Pros. Totally different design. They appear to be more sturdy and durable than the Spirit Pros. Many users, including @richardyot have been using the Spirit Pros for years without issue.

    I’ve seen many forum threads about the cracks, and people claiming Focal refused to help. That was not my experience. They replaced two sets of headphones for me free of charge. I’m very pleased with the Focal Listen Pros.

    Exact same boat. Two pairs of cracked Spirit Pros and Sweetwater has just recently sent me a new pair of Listen Pros as a replacement. Much happier with this new design. And I’ve been using them with Sonarworks on my iMac through Logic. With that profile they are deadly accurate for mix duties. I read that Sonarworks were planning to release an iOS app. Not sure if that’s still happening but I feel it would be a major step for this platform in the headphone mixing and critical listening department.

    After reading your post, I became curious about Sonarworks. From your review and the many more on other audio/recording forums, I’d pay the $80 for an iOS version of True-Fi.

  • @johnfromberkeley said:
    Audio Technica ATH 50mx

    I’m super happy with mine. I mix with monitors but the ATH 50mx’s will get you pretty close, very comfortable, and the highs are clean and accurate. But not all ears will agree, ever.

  • I recommend the Sennheiser HD-380 Pro and since I had the Beyer Dynamic DT 770 Pro in the past my experience for the Sennheiser over the Beyer is

    • Lighter
    • Much more comfortable
    • Less isolation
    • Not so deep and strong bass as the Beyer (the Beyer’s best feature : bass)
    • Not so wide stereo field , but has depth
    • More overall balanced sound (a bit low mid ,but tight)
    • Could listen more hours .

    And my top pick (to understand my subjective taste in sound) is beyerdynamic DT-990 Pro, which in your case I don’t recommend since they are open back ...

  • I really like the Audiotechnica M50X, I also use the Sennheiser HD598 a lot, but you get a lot of noise leakage due to the open back design, but they are the most comfortable headphones I have ever used, ideal for super long sessions where you aren’t going to annoy anyone else, they also tend to let a lot of noise in too. But they sound amazing.

    The Audiotecnica M50X also sound excellent and are closed back so you won’t annoy anyone, but they aren’t as comfortable as the Sennheisers, not uncomfortable though, but after a long time you will feel ear fatigue.

    Plus you won’t need a preamp with either of these, and they will both go pretty loud without any real noticeable difference in sound quality.

  • @richardyot said:
    A word of caution about asking for headphone advice on the internet: the world is split pretty evenly between people who like bright headphones and people who like dark headphones (bright = emphasized treble, lacking in bass, and dark = muted treble and/or emphasized bass). Everyone hears slightly differently and has different tastes, and it's important to know where you are on that spectrum if you are going to take people's advice.

    It's not really possible to make neutral headphones BTW, because a flat sound would sound really thin and lacking in bass because we are used to listening in real spaces where high frequencies get absorbed - for example listening to the same speakers in a room with carpets vs. a room with wooden flooring or tiles is going to be markedly different due to the way that the highs would be absorbed by the carpet and reflected by the harder surfaces. So all headphones need to make some frequency compensation in order not to sound weird. The debate is how much compensation should there be?

    Some people hate bass-heavy cans, and some people hate treble-heavy cans. That's why there is a difference between the house sound of Sennheiser, AKG, Audio-Technica, Sony etc...

    Sennheiser and Beyer Dynamic are traditionally warmer sounding. I wouldn't say that Sennheiser are bass-heavy, but the highs are definitely not tiring to listen too. Beyer tend to have slightly recessed mids and warm, deep lows, with crisp highs. (Neither of these brands are going to be bass-heavy like Beats, which are ridiculous and sound awful.)

    The Sony and the Status Audio cans are brighter, with less bass and a more pronounced treble.

    IMO Sennheiser is like listening to big speakers in a carpeted room, and Sony is like listening to small speakers in a room with wooden floors.

    There is no right or wrong type of headphone, but personal preference plays a very significant part in your final choice, and it's really important to listen to any headphones you plan to buy first so that you can decide if they are right for you.

    Great post filled with excellent analogies (particularly the Sennheiser versus Sony comparison). I'm no sound engineer, but I do think about headphones differently when I'm recording/monitoring instruments versus throwing on an album and just listening to music. For the latter, I probably do prefer a "darker"/warmer sound. There's nothing wrong with favoring certain frequencies when listening to music. I would argue that Beats headphones turned a lot of people into wannabe audiophiles by overemphasizing low frequencies that drown out the rest of the music (similar to how the release of the iPhone made a lot of people feel like "techies" when they really aren't). BUT, if you just happen to prefer how a pair of Beats sounds with the type of music you listen to, who am I to tell you not to enjoy that?

    But music creation and mastering is different. You want something flat, or at least expressive across the entire frequency spectrum so you can actually hear changes to the music you are recording/producing. Also, you may be working on an individual instrument that fits into a mix, and certain instruments are supposed to occupy different frequency ranges so they fit well together.

    This happens a ton with guitar players and perceptions of "tone". Lots of players start out on thin, brittle-sounding cheap amps, so they lust after darker, fuller tones. But guitar frequencies thrive in the mids, and if you're a live player - or even recording and wanting your part to be heard "in the mix", a super full-sounding or dark guitar part that you prefer in isolation is likely to become a mumbled mess with no articulation in the overall sound.

    Good studio monitors can "handle" bass well, but do so in a way that articulates different notes and frequencies. You should be able to hear the changes of notes in the lower frequencies without experiencing the swell and decay of a giant kick or sub bass that drowns everything out.

  • Sennheiser HD7. Ideal if you want to sleep in the train.

  • @anickt said:
    Sony MDR-7506

    +1

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