Audiobus: Your virtual music studio.

What is Audiobus?Audiobus is an award-winning music app for iPhone and iPad which lets you use your other music apps together. Chain effects on your favourite synth, run the output of apps or Audio Units into an app like GarageBand or Loopy, or select a different audio interface output for each app. Route MIDI between apps — drive a synth from a MIDI sequencer, or add an arpeggiator to your MIDI keyboard — or sync with your external MIDI gear. And control your entire setup from a MIDI controller.

Download on the App Store

Audiobus is the app that makes the rest of your setup better.

I want to dabble in electronic music

So I think I want to dabble in electronic music. Questions:

  1. So many genres! I think I’d be good at slow jams, almost smooth jazz like.

2 I come from acoustic music background. So I’m used to playing every part in with a keyboard. However do most people program notes in? Or use a sequencer?

  1. If so to #2, how to use a sequencer with a DAW or host? I feel I need to maybe buy stuff

My apps
Audiobus 2
AudioShare
Auria Pro with Q2, C, L, R, Timeless Saturn Volcano
Cubasis 2 with no extras
Garageband
SampleTank with American Acoustic
Patterning
Neosoul keys
iGrand
Galileo 2
Synthkit
Synthmaster player
Syntronic free
Animoog
Model 15
Nanologue
TF7 with one IAP
EOS2
Haaze
Notion

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Comments

  • Get AUM. Get Rozeta. Keep it simple to start. Explore and have fun. Music is fun.

  • That does sound fun😁. Seems like generative sequencing is the main workflow?

  • edited July 2018

    no need for aum
    audiobus 3 will do

    a) play live
    b) use some midi plugin (rosetta, polystep arp, what have you)
    c) both

  • Get audiokit SynthOne. Free!

  • @Max23 said:
    no need for aum
    audiobus 3 will do

    a) play live
    b) use some midi plugin (rosetta, polystep arp, what have you)
    c) both

    Subjective but I find AUM has a much more smooth workflow.

  • Keep it simple, just use a few elements and spend time adding effects as part of the performance. You have everything you need already it’s just needs your time.

  • edited July 2018

    @99476598326 said:

    @Max23 said:
    no need for aum
    audiobus 3 will do

    a) play live
    b) use some midi plugin (rosetta, polystep arp, what have you)
    c) both

    Subjective but I find AUM has a much more smooth workflow.

    im rocking audiobus 3.1 since month (released yesterday)
    workflow fucking rocks, I helped tweaking it ;)

  • @Max23 said:

    @99476598326 said:

    @Max23 said:
    no need for aum
    audiobus 3 will do

    a) play live
    b) use some midi plugin (rosetta, polystep arp, what have you)
    c) both

    Subjective but I find AUM has a much more smooth workflow.

    im rocking audiobus 3.1 since month (released yesterday)
    workflow fucking rocks, I helped tweaking it ;)

    Good for you! :)
    I had a BIG anti-climax with AB3.1 where Pro-Q 2 simply refuses to work properly :(
    (Every time I add it as an effect it kills the audio and also messes with the midi-clock?!).

    It works perfectly in all other hosts on my Air 2, iOS11.4.1...

  • @Jmcmillan said:
    That does sound fun😁. Seems like generative sequencing is the main workflow?

    I don’t use rozeta for the generative plugins but you can.> @Max23 said:

    @99476598326 said:

    @Max23 said:
    no need for aum
    audiobus 3 will do

    a) play live
    b) use some midi plugin (rosetta, polystep arp, what have you)
    c) both

    Subjective but I find AUM has a much more smooth workflow.

    im rocking audiobus 3.1 since month (released yesterday)
    workflow fucking rocks, I helped tweaking it ;)

    If it works for you then great.

  • edited July 2018

    @Samu said:

    @Max23 said:

    @99476598326 said:

    @Max23 said:
    no need for aum
    audiobus 3 will do

    a) play live
    b) use some midi plugin (rosetta, polystep arp, what have you)
    c) both

    Subjective but I find AUM has a much more smooth workflow.

    im rocking audiobus 3.1 since month (released yesterday)
    workflow fucking rocks, I helped tweaking it ;)

    Good for you! :)
    I had a BIG anti-climax with AB3.1 where Pro-Q 2 simply refuses to work properly :(
    (Every time I add it as an effect it kills the audio and also messes with the midi-clock?!).

    It works perfectly in all other hosts on my Air 2, iOS11.4.1...

    go to settings
    press get support
    will be fixed asap( if its a bug in ab and not the plugin)
    (I dont have every plugin in the world)
    its rock solid for me

  • edited July 2018

    Or Korg Gadget. I think Gadget is a perfect way to force yourself to think in repeating/evolving loops - which is probably the hardest thing if you’re coming from a live performance keys background.

    I know from (jazz) piano-playing friends that the minimalism aspect of electronic music is quite difficult to submit to. :)

  • @brambos said:
    Or Korg Gadget. I think Gadget is a perfect way to force yourself to think in repeating/evolving loops - which is probably the hardest thing if you’re coming from a live performance keys background.

    Gadget’s on sale and is tempting. My only hang up is the closed system. I’ve got DAWs and synths so it kinda feels like buying what I already have🤔

    I know from (jazz) piano-playing friends that the minimalism aspect of electronic music is quite difficult to submit to. :)

    You said it perfectly! I’m having that feeling of “I’m not really playing this therefore it’s not enough”, Feels like cheating if arpegiators are doing most of the work! but I think I have to just jump in and try😬

  • edited July 2018

    @Jmcmillan said:

    @brambos said:
    Or Korg Gadget. I think Gadget is a perfect way to force yourself to think in repeating/evolving loops - which is probably the hardest thing if you’re coming from a live performance keys background.

    Gadget’s on sale and is tempting. My only hang up is the closed system. I’ve got DAWs and synths so it kinda feels like buying what I already have🤔

    Virtually everything on iOS is suitable for electronic music, so using what you already have makes a lot of sense. I just mentioned Gadget because the designs of some apps are more conducive or guiding into the direction of electronic music than others. For example, using a linear timeline UI like Cubasis will likely tempt you to play much more like you're used to than a loop/pattern-based UI. So you're looking for a UI that will give you culture-shock (to shock you out of your comfort zone), but not necessarily a long learning curve. :)

  • @brambos said:

    @Jmcmillan said:

    @brambos said:
    Or Korg Gadget. I think Gadget is a perfect way to force yourself to think in repeating/evolving loops - which is probably the hardest thing if you’re coming from a live performance keys background.

    Gadget’s on sale and is tempting. My only hang up is the closed system. I’ve got DAWs and synths so it kinda feels like buying what I already have🤔

    Virtually everything on iOS is suitable for electronic music, so using what you already have makes a lot of sense. I just mentioned Gadget because the designs of some apps are more conducive or guiding into the direction of electronic music than others. For example, using a linear timeline UI like Cubasis will likely tempt you to play much more like you're used to than a loop/pattern-based UI. So you're looking for a UI that will give you culture-shock (to shock you out of your comfort zone), but not necessarily a long learning curve. :)

    Makes since. Thanks for the advice! I wonder if Rosetta would help with that culture shock

  • @brambos said:

    @Jmcmillan said:

    @brambos said:
    Or Korg Gadget. I think Gadget is a perfect way to force yourself to think in repeating/evolving loops - which is probably the hardest thing if you’re coming from a live performance keys background.

    Gadget’s on sale and is tempting. My only hang up is the closed system. I’ve got DAWs and synths so it kinda feels like buying what I already have🤔

    Virtually everything on iOS is suitable for electronic music, so using what you already have makes a lot of sense. I just mentioned Gadget because the designs of some apps are more conducive or guiding into the direction of electronic music than others. For example, using a linear timeline UI like Cubasis will likely tempt you to play much more like you're used to than a loop/pattern-based UI. So you're looking for a UI that will give you culture-shock (to shock you out of your comfort zone), but not necessarily a long learning curve. :)

    Also some of the great electronic music was not done on DAW’s and very little gear.

  • edited July 2018

    @Jmcmillan said:

    @brambos said:
    Or Korg Gadget. I think Gadget is a perfect way to force yourself to think in repeating/evolving loops - which is probably the hardest thing if you’re coming from a live performance keys background.
    I know from (jazz) piano-playing friends that the minimalism aspect of electronic music is quite difficult to submit to. :)

    You said it perfectly! I’m having that feeling of “I’m not really playing this therefore it’s not enough”, Feels like cheating if arpegiators are doing most of the work! but I think I have to just jump in and try😬

    I started on guitar/ bass, have always mainly been a singer. And I dont care too much about the 'cheating' sense, what I appreciate as a listener is the final product. But that includes the human elements, the human nuances in accents, swing (not the swing knob, but really playing with a more complex groove), and even subtle imperfections if you will. But often incorporating some velocity effect in a patch and just playing parts without quantization gets me there. So yes it is recorded into a sequencer if you will, but recording it, from a user, functional perspective, is not much different than recording audio. But correcting midi mistakes is easier than audio. This is quite style dependent, so not a 'right v. wrong' answer I realize.

    Relatedly, arpeggiators, I intellectually appreciate the value of arpeggiators. But I don't often write anything that has a straight arpeggio. Or if I do, it is more counter-melodic and thus not too fast just to play (again back to the nuance). But where they are super handy....I just use simple ones, e.g. no note change 16ths or 8ths as pseudo strumming/fast picking.

  • This chap, Eddie Cochran, in an alternative timeline where he hadn’t died young would quite clearly have abandoned his guitar and wholesale adopted synths and sequencers as soon as he would be introduced to them a few years after he died in our timeline. Listen to the systems oriented composition and performance in his music – quite clearly crying out for sequencing. In this alternate timeline, he becomes famous again for his synth style, and Kraftwerk become more influenced by him than The Beach Boys (which in our timeline is a primary influence of theirs).

  • I would say if you can play, that's the best way to write any kind of music, including EDM and electronica. Play the riffs, the basslines, the melodies, and the chords. That's were the joy is to be found anyway, and the best tunes as well.

    If you write by playing/performing the process is a lot more organic than drawing notes into a piano roll or letting the arpeggiator or randomizer do it for you. You might occasionally come up with something cool with generative processes, but it's a lot less fun and engaging than actually performing the music yourself IMO.

  • @richardyot said:
    I would say if you can play, that's the best way to write any kind of music, including EDM and electronica. Play the riffs, the basslines, the melodies, and the chords. That's were the joy is to be found anyway, and the best tunes as well.

    If you write by playing/performing the process is a lot more organic than drawing notes into a piano roll or letting the arpeggiator or randomizer do it for you. You might occasionally come up with something cool with generative processes, but it's a lot less fun and engaging than actually performing the music yourself IMO.

    That’s my struggle in trying to decide to buy a sequencer or not. Seems like I don’t need one. If there’s a terribly difficult passage I can’t play, I could draw it in

  • edited July 2018

    @Jmcmillan said:

    @richardyot said:
    I would say if you can play, that's the best way to write any kind of music, including EDM and electronica. Play the riffs, the basslines, the melodies, and the chords. That's were the joy is to be found anyway, and the best tunes as well.

    If you write by playing/performing the process is a lot more organic than drawing notes into a piano roll or letting the arpeggiator or randomizer do it for you. You might occasionally come up with something cool with generative processes, but it's a lot less fun and engaging than actually performing the music yourself IMO.

    That’s my struggle in trying to decide to buy a sequencer or not. Seems like I don’t need one. If there’s a terribly difficult passage I can’t play, I could draw it in

    You've already got GarageBand, that has a sequencer. I write most of my music in GarageBand, it's an awesome writing environment. Rather than draw in the difficult passages just use the quantization tools to fix the timing mistakes (or just move the bad notes manually in the piano roll), best of both worlds that way.

  • I play everything live direct into the sequencer, always. Have done for years.

    …at about 72% speed, of course.

  • edited July 2018

    @Jmcmillan said:

    @richardyot said:
    I would say if you can play, that's the best way to write any kind of music, including EDM and electronica. Play the riffs, the basslines, the melodies, and the chords. That's were the joy is to be found anyway, and the best tunes as well.

    If you write by playing/performing the process is a lot more organic than drawing notes into a piano roll or letting the arpeggiator or randomizer do it for you. You might occasionally come up with something cool with generative processes, but it's a lot less fun and engaging than actually performing the music yourself IMO.

    That’s my struggle in trying to decide to buy a sequencer or not. Seems like I don’t need one. If there’s a terribly difficult passage I can’t play, I could draw it in

    Why not start with the most classic of sequencers, iOS version of the Roland sh-101, you sort of play the sequence yourself via a keyboard. You can learn a lot from this method.

    https://appsto.re/de/pQIS7.i?uo=4&at=10l4Ky&ct=forum

  • Every time I have played some keyboard riffs in front of an EDM-based musician they would usually say "I wish I had learned to do that as a kid."

    Then they play me their music and I really get that there's more than one way to do anything. Keyboard skills are like touch typing in a sense. Very productive for writing in the pre-computer world but not the only way to produce text and communicate.

    I shared my Korg keyboard with my nephew in 1990 and today he
    builds and sells vintage Analog Synth products, runs a EDM Music Label with mostly vinyl and some downloadable products and has a music studio with $10,000 worth of gear. He says my playing of that Korg and what could be done with it changed his life. He still can't play keys or read music but he found a way to get his muse organized and has really done well following his path without a single "music lesson". Teenage Engineering sends him new products to beta every year and he works their booth at NAMM every year since he lives close. He lives and dies with sequencers.

    You sir do NOT need one but you could certainly program one
    because you know how harmony, rhythm and melody combine to move people.

  • edited July 2018

    Agree with @richardyot Jam the notes in live and then use that to create a base to create with. It’s easy to sort out timing and bumb notes, but not so easy to try to program music with feeling.

    Yeah random sequences have their place too, but they are often just idea starters for when the brain really isn’t playing ball lol :p

    Obviously this is what I suggest, but do whatever works for you - it’s only yourself you have to please at least until it becomes a business

  • The user and all related content has been deleted.
  • edited July 2018

    hm, maybe you are thinking in a much to classic way about music?
    harmony, melody, rhythm ...

    start thinking about sound and texture and how it makes you feel

    this is just two chords if you would look at it as written notes it would look like nothing (well not much, a little counterpoint I guess) and its absolutely brillant


    this is just sound, more or less, how to get away with 2 sequencer lines & 4 soundsources,
    (a good synthesizer and an ear for sound)

  • If like myself you find you never quite reach a destination, just make sure that you are really enjoying the journey. If it’s a fun journey than the end result becomes less dominant. You will just keep coming back for new experiences. New journeys. More fun :)

  • I wish I could really play keys, but not necessarily for electronic music.

    For most [not all!] subgenres of EM it's simply too easy to overdo it when you're actually playing it...
    I would really try to experiment with the minimum number of 'notes' you can get away with - and then try to find other ways to 'fill the voids': create syncopated rhythms using hamfisted multitap delays, ratchet a few drums, layer a kick with a bass (or tune the kick to double as a bassline). Use some subtle (detuning) pads in the background.

    And it's all about the buildup. Add up layers, then peel them away, rinse, repeat...

    B)

  • @u0421793 said:
    I play everything live direct into the sequencer, always. Have done for years.

    …at about 72% speed, of course.

    That’s my preferred workflow on circuit and Digitone too, but unfortunately within AUM there is no sequencer that can be played and recorded live... or please tell me I am missing one. SPA does not do the trick

    I discovered that, when I turn @brambos Kosmonaut into looper mode and set the 4 heads to 0, 25, 50, and 75% percent I kinda have a little live looper I can use like that. Tell me which app I am overseeing :wink:

    BTW, really great advices here, everyone!!!

  • @brambos said:
    For most [not all!] subgenres of EM it's simply too easy to overdo it when you're actually playing it...

    I think that applies to most genres of music (although of course this is a personal and subjective statement). Simple melodies are usually the best, and overplaying muddies the message. All of the really great, truly memorable, riffs are dead simple, melodically and harmonically. You need to be able to sing it in your head and remember it after the first listen for it to be really effective.

    I think what composing by jamming achieves is more inspiring rhythms, that you don't get from machines. IMO rhythm is the the thing that makes a riff or melody groove.

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