Semi-Serious Question: Is It My Music or Bram’s?

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Comments

  • @CracklePot said:
    I wonder if Jackson Pollock ever stopped to wonder exactly what the hell he was up to?

    I flick and spray notes like he does with paint lol

  • I completely NAILED the Discord 4 settings, which ought to count for something considering I’m using an iPhone 6.

    It’s great to see so many opinions on this. My first post made this seem more of a personal crisis than it is — I have utilized a number of different randomizers in my day (ranging from algorithms to throwing darts to taking drugs to enforcing arbitrary decisions). Some of the best songs I’ve written came “out of the blue” from a gnarly fuzztone or a stupid time signature, and most of the worst came out of a deliberate “artistic vision” or goal. Although a lot of the worst came from smoking weed, too.

    There is also more curation to this than I let on. Tapping “Generate” until I find something I like isn’t much different from strumming chords until I find something I like, and as in my other musical pursuits, I’m very particular about the drums. But all the same, my last three days of music making have been completely facilitated by one other person (two if you count Liljedahl) — certainly a photographer wouldn’t owe his art to the camera maker, and a painter doesn’t owe his art to the brushmaker, but at what point does a brush become a stencil?

    The real test is whether I can harness it and get better.

  • @Kühl said:

    Man, I thought you meant Johannes Brahms and I clicked like a maniac :smile:
    Bram is fantastic, no doubt there, but the life and love of Brahms is so totally fascinating.
    The young Johannes coming to the Schumann household, becomes in love with the older Clara (the best pianist in Europe besides Liszt) and Robert Schumanns suicide attempt in the Rhine, the madness, death, unfulfilled love... his struggle with symphony nr 1 (everyone awaited the 10th Beethoven & they got it) his walks and discussions with Mahler at the Toblach Sea, cancer, last concert... atheism, death... legacy. He was a beautiful human being.
    So I just froze. Someone here interested in that LoL
    Carry on guys.

    Brahms is cool. Have you ever read/seen Bernstein's analysis of Brahms' Fourth? I first read the written version, but there is also an audio version:

  • @RUST( i )K said:
    Does it make you happy?

    Then that is your answer.

    This.

    Simple.

  • Why do you make music? Only you know if what you create expresses what you want to express and fulfills you as a composer, performer, jammer, producer, dj or whatever you call yourself.

  • I am perfectly happy giving the credit for the montage’s that come chirping out of my speakers to Bram. In fact, that’s what I am going to start telling the wife. Bram did it, Audio Damage screwed it up, FAC made it louder so don’t blame me. She should just feel lucky I didn’t get that Amazing Noise or ApeSoft guy involved.... yet....

  • @u0421793 said:
    Many years ago when I was a street photographer at lunchtimes and teaching at college during the other times, I posed a question to my students.

    If I go out to Trafalgar Square (as I often did) and hand a person my camera (as tourists often do) and then instead of posing for the person to shoot my picture, I pointed at a scene over there and asked them to take the photo while I stood beside them, am I the photographer?

    That’s auteurism, baby! Let’s do lunch

  • @JudgeDredd said:
    I am perfectly happy giving the credit for the montage’s that come chirping out of my speakers to Bram. In fact, that’s what I am going to start telling the wife. Bram did it, Audio Damage screwed it up, FAC made it louder so don’t blame me. She should just feel lucky I didn’t get that Amazing Noise or ApeSoft guy involved.... yet....

    I like this. It makes me realize what a big iOS music nerd I have become, since I find your comment so amusing. :)

  • And to respond to the OP, I have this copy paste from a quick Google search:

    A player piano can be played by hand in the usual way. The pedals and keyboard are identical to an ordinary piano. It just has the additional capacity to play by itself.

  • @CracklePot said:

    @JudgeDredd said:
    I am perfectly happy giving the credit for the montage’s that come chirping out of my speakers to Bram. In fact, that’s what I am going to start telling the wife. Bram did it, Audio Damage screwed it up, FAC made it louder so don’t blame me. She should just feel lucky I didn’t get that Amazing Noise or ApeSoft guy involved.... yet....

    I like this. It makes me realize what a big iOS music nerd I have become, since I find your comment so amusing. :)

    Thank you, not everyone gets my weird sense of humor, especially my wife. I usually just get the eye roll.

  • Listening to other people's music makes us happy, right? Hit the play button and enjoy. So being happy doesn't answer the question. Is the music "mine?"

    I've been involved in music one way or another since I was a teenager. Most often these days I'm a tinkerer, doodler, student and sound explorer. There are so many apps, or functions within apps, that will generate something to listen to, possibly to inspire, maybe to incorporate into a larger whole. "Drummer" or "Smart Drums" is like hiring someone who plays, telling him or her the gist of what you want, then letting them do their thing. I've got some cool Kontakt apps that are like hiring a good studio musician. I can still edit and be the final arbiter.

    One way to look at it is like, a piano or violin maker builds the instrument, but you make the music. Are algorithms the instrument or the composer? It depends on how much my decision-making plays a role in the final piece. Choosing a few settings? Picking from a sampling of those outcomes? That's at best a beginning. Primarily, the app programmer's decisions contributed to the making of music or whatever one chooses to call it. That's my feeling about it, but if you like what you've got, feel it's yours, be happy.

  • @u0421793 said:
    Many years ago when I was a street photographer at lunchtimes and teaching at college during the other times, I posed a question to my students.

    If I go out to Trafalgar Square (as I often did) and hand a person my camera (as tourists often do) and then instead of posing for the person to shoot my picture, I pointed at a scene over there and asked them to take the photo while I stood beside them, am I the photographer?

    I think you are. The other person is presumably just another unthinking piece of gear. Like you're using a remote trigger. If you adjusted the camera to get the exposure you want, and they frame it as you direct, you made the image.

  • If it was indeed your finger that pushed the Random button, then yes, you are to blame. ;)

  • Lovely thread.

  • @JudgeDredd said:
    I am perfectly happy giving the credit for the montage’s that come chirping out of my speakers to Bram. In fact, that’s what I am going to start telling the wife. Bram did it, Audio Damage screwed it up, FAC made it louder so don’t blame me. She should just feel lucky I didn’t get that Amazing Noise or ApeSoft guy involved.... yet....

    I like your strategy.

  • There is more than one way to make any kind of artistic expression. Bram’s tools are amazing and you could certainly argue that making them (and making them so well!) is its own art form, but they’re still just tools - curating and directing their output is where you come in to the picture.

    To take an analogy all the way out to hyperbole - I don’t think anyone would seriously contend that Roland Barthes, Andy Warhol, or Ai Weiwei weren’t artists on the grounds that their most famous works are assemblages of objects found or made to spec at their direction.

  • edited March 3 Vote Up0

    @richardyot said:
    Maybe I'm just superstitious, but I really believe art has to have something of the intangible to make it, well, art. Otherwise it's just wallpaper.

    >

    Correct. It’s the magic sauce.

    RTM uses lots of professionally recorded samples, our own stuff, bits of live playing, and sometimes generated notes also go into the mix. Lyrics and vocals are always original. But it’s the putting this together - making those infinitely variable choices on our own - that makes it ours; an original sum of many parts, and something that no machine or app could wholly generate.

    With reference to those pro samples, which we pay for, we see this as not much different to hiring pro musicians. They play the notes, but in our case at least, no one sample is the song. Arranging and composing all those elements is just today’s equivalent of what someone like Phil Spector pioneered.

  • @CracklePot said:
    I wonder if Jackson Pollock ever stopped to wonder exactly what the hell he was up to?

    >

    Unlikely. If he’d stopped to analyse it, whatever sub-conscious thing that made it work so well might have stopped.

  • edited March 3 Vote Up0

    @magnusxe said:
    Also, does a 90's rap producer making beats for Jay-z with a 4 bar soul sample and a few breaks count as an original piece or a remix?

    >

    A bit of both. Remixing the soul sample and Jay-Z’s original input, which together make something that did not exist before.

    It only gets silly when chancers like Sean Combs try to claim royalties for speaking over what is, in terms of the music being played, exactly what someone else did.

  • @Wrlds2ndBstGeoshredr said:

    @Kühl said:

    Man, I thought you meant Johannes Brahms and I clicked like a maniac :smile:
    Bram is fantastic, no doubt there, but the life and love of Brahms is so totally fascinating.
    The young Johannes coming to the Schumann household, becomes in love with the older Clara (the best pianist in Europe besides Liszt) and Robert Schumanns suicide attempt in the Rhine, the madness, death, unfulfilled love... his struggle with symphony nr 1 (everyone awaited the 10th Beethoven & they got it) his walks and discussions with Mahler at the Toblach Sea, cancer, last concert... atheism, death... legacy. He was a beautiful human being.
    So I just froze. Someone here interested in that LoL
    Carry on guys.

    Brahms is cool. Have you ever read/seen Bernstein's analysis of Brahms' Fourth? I first read the written version, but there is also an audio version:

    Thank you man. This was a treasure for me. I haven’t seen this before, and I love Lenny.
    I’m so in love with Clara Schumann that I’m almost freaking out :wink:
    She’s the picture on my iPhone.

    Have you seen the movie?

  • If your song sounds like any of the ones of the link I posted, there's no escape: it's Brahms'!

  • @u0421793 said:

    Liszt is a favorite of mine. He was the rock star of his day - long hair, black cape, ladies swooning and screaming. What a performer and composer.

  • @dvlmusic said:

    @u0421793 said:

    Liszt is a favorite of mine. He was the rock star of his day - long hair, black cape, ladies swooning and screaming. What a performer and composer.

    Do you watch Mozart in the Jungle? There was some really great references to Liszt on that show.

  • @CracklePot said:

    @dvlmusic said:

    @u0421793 said:

    Liszt is a favorite of mine. He was the rock star of his day - long hair, black cape, ladies swooning and screaming. What a performer and composer.

    Do you watch Mozart in the Jungle? There was some really great references to Liszt on that show.

    No but my wife did. Can't remember if she liked it or not.....

  • @Kühl said:

    Thank you man. This was a treasure for me. I haven’t seen this before, and I love Lenny.
    I’m so in love with Clara Schumann that I’m almost freaking out :wink:
    She’s the picture on my iPhone.

    Have you seen the movie?

    It really is a stunning analysis. I learned a lot about composition from it when I first read it back in the early 1980s and became quite inspired. I have not seen the Clara movie. I don't have any German, and my Spanish is only at B1, but I can get the gist of the subtitles.

  • @Wrlds2ndBstGeoshredr said:

    @Kühl said:

    Thank you man. This was a treasure for me. I haven’t seen this before, and I love Lenny.
    I’m so in love with Clara Schumann that I’m almost freaking out :wink:
    She’s the picture on my iPhone.

    Have you seen the movie?

    It really is a stunning analysis. I learned a lot about composition from it when I first read it back in the early 1980s and became quite inspired. I have not seen the Clara movie. I don't have any German, and my Spanish is only at B1, but I can get the gist of the subtitles.

    Ups, sorry man. I’m so used to us Europeans being multilingual. So being Norwegian I speak 4 germanic languages plus English. But I suck in Spanish and the Latin languages.
    The German is clearly dubbed here, so I wonder if it’s also available in English.

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