Procreate - drawing and sketching

Having just bought an Apple Pencil to play around with sketching and drawing using Procreate I can certainly see what makes the iPad Pro a pro-level tool. This is really impressively awesome stuff and the experience with the pencil is very fluid and convincing.

I'm just beginning to dabble with it, but for me the hardest part so far is the complete lack of friction between the pencil and the glass screen. It makes even the simplest things - like drawing a circle - a lot harder than I'm used to on real paper. I hope it doesn't take too long to get used to that :)

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  • Also the adobe sketch and draw are brilliant apps for the pencil

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  • @brambos said:
    Having just bought an Apple Pencil to play around with sketching and drawing using Procreate I can certainly see what makes the iPad Pro a pro-level tool. This is really impressively awesome stuff and the experience with the pencil is very fluid and convincing.

    I'm just beginning to dabble with it, but for me the hardest part so far is the complete lack of friction between the pencil and the glass screen. It makes even the simplest things - like drawing a circle - a lot harder than I'm used to on real paper. I hope it doesn't take too long to get used to that :)

    I haven't got a Pro or Apple Pencil so not sure if you can do this, but I usually put a sheet of paper on my Wacom tablet, which gives it a more realistic feel.

  • My other half is learning pro create and had the same problem till we got a paper-like screen protector. It feels matte to the touch and makes all the difference apparently.
    https://paperlike.com/

    I’m not affiliated, just thought I’d log back in for brambos cos you are a legend ;-)

  • You get used to it eventually. :)

    I've been using Wacoms since 2001, and a Cintiq since 2008. I actually stopped using paper for the longest time, eventually returning back to it a couple of years ago. In the end the flexibility of digital is so much more convenient that I don't really miss the the more tactile feel of paper. With digital it's so easy to fix mistakes: head too big? Just lasso it and scale it down. Need to rotate an arm? Done.

    I spent a few years from 2009 to 2014 drawing storyboards professionally, and I used a Tablet PC for that (way before the Apple Pencil existed). I would be working at advertising agencies under enormous pressure, and being able to edit stuff made a huge difference. Whenever the art directors made changes, my colleagues working on paper would have to start again from scratch, but I could just edit my existing frames, and it saved a lot of time.

    But it does take some time to get used to the feel of drawing on glass, I always thought it was closer to inking with a brush rather than drawing with a pencil. Practice will get you there though.

  • @BiancaNeve said:
    Anyone tried this?

    https://paperlike.com/

    haha, great minds think alike ;-) ...

    Yes its really good

  • @no1normal said:

    @BiancaNeve said:
    Anyone tried this?

    https://paperlike.com/

    haha, great minds think alike ;-) ...

    Yes its really good

    Interesting, thanks I might try that.
    I've gotten used to it but the initial feeling of the hard tip of the Pencil against the glass is counterintuitive so this might do the trick :)

  • as richardyot said, you will learn to draw on a glass surface soon. I come from traditional arts, started digital painting with graphic tablets, and now also with iPad Pro. Digital painting is still a bit abstract for me, but it's convenient to work without paper or canvas, especially if you don't have an atelier to store all the material.

    Thanks for the tip with Paperlike. I immediately ordered a set. For me it's the missing part. I like to draw and paint outdoors, and the reflections on the glass surface are disturbing during sunshine. It appears that this screen protector will solve this problem. And gives some rough texture to the surface.

  • Apple Pencil + iPad Pro + Procreate has been literally life changing for me. I’ve done a lot of comics over the last few decades and this was the real wheelhouse of my inner and projected self, but in 2013 I crammed a comics deadline too tight during a period where I was also doing a prodigious amount of Excel at my day job, and bang, the cubital nerve in my right arm gave up the game. Could no longer do anything that involved firmly gripping a narrow or thin object in my right hand without incurring lasting pain, hot and coldness, numbness etc.

    Did no comics 2013-2017. Kind of died inside.

    Was hanging out with cartoonist friends in September and tried one of their pencil + pro + procreate setups. Kept going for an hour - almost no pain. It seems the much lesser pressure demanded by the Apple Pencil, plus the frictionless surface action, are within the bounds of what mr cubital can tolerate.

    Maxed out my PC Richard credit card to get my own. Have new weekly strip debuting later this month. When I showed the pages to a cartoonist friend, he thought I’d only colored it in procreate and the linework was all analog, but it’s 100% procreate. Joy.

    Incidentally, the same injury drastically reduced my tolerance for picking and strumming guitar in a similar way. This actually led to my delving into iOS synthesis and composition which then became an obsession that almost stood in for the missing comics activity for a few years there (except there are a few people out there who want new comics from me but nobody who's waiting for new tracks, lol) Now they have to compete with each other for mental space; a good problem to have.

  • Two things that are useful to know. One; editing the pressure curve settings to get it to a place where you feel comfortable.. having to press so hard on the screen doesn’t feel natural to me and has put me off of potentially great apps like Adobe Sketch etc. Two; editing the brush behavior can also help with flow and control. If you find you’re needing a more controlled smooth line, turn the line smoothing way up and this will help with slow controlled drawing.

    I use Procreate on almost a daily basis professionally and it’s fantastic. I think a big part of their success is that the UI gets out of your way and just let’s you create (not unlike bram’s apps).

    @no1normal Ive heard the matte screen protectors wear down the nib of the pencil, is there a significant amount of wear or does it still last a long while?

  • Procreate is awesome. As for the Pencil/friction, once I got used to it, my handwriting hasn’t been this neat in years. Which is mostly due to writing regularly again, something I can thank the Pencil for. I think it’s a fine piece of work, though for handwriting the smoothest response is hands-down Apple’s barebones Notes app.

  • @brambos said:
    Having just bought an Apple Pencil to play around with sketching and drawing using Procreate I can certainly see what makes the iPad Pro a pro-level tool. This is really impressively awesome stuff and the experience with the pencil is very fluid and convincing.

    I'm just beginning to dabble with it, but for me the hardest part so far is the complete lack of friction between the pencil and the glass screen. It makes even the simplest things - like drawing a circle - a lot harder than I'm used to on real paper. I hope it doesn't take too long to get used to that :)

    You should also try affinity photo for ipad. That app is basically photoshop, and it kicks ass. I use it for illustration all the time.

  • @Keenan said:
    Two things that are useful to know. One; editing the pressure curve settings to get it to a place where you feel comfortable.. having to press so hard on the screen doesn’t feel natural to me and has put me off of potentially great apps like Adobe Sketch etc. Two; editing the brush behavior can also help with flow and control. If you find you’re needing a more controlled smooth line, turn the line smoothing way up and this will help with slow controlled drawing.

    I use Procreate on almost a daily basis professionally and it’s fantastic. I think a big part of their success is that the UI gets out of your way and just let’s you create (not unlike bram’s apps).

    @no1normal Ive heard the matte screen protectors wear down the nib of the pencil, is there a significant amount of wear or does it still last a long while?

    Only had the screen protector on for a couple of weeks (used daily but not professionally) so its too early to see any wear on the pencil. So far, so good tho... It adds a nice amount of resistance to the glass (paperlike)

  • @no1normal said:

    @Keenan said:
    Two things that are useful to know. One; editing the pressure curve settings to get it to a place where you feel comfortable.. having to press so hard on the screen doesn’t feel natural to me and has put me off of potentially great apps like Adobe Sketch etc. Two; editing the brush behavior can also help with flow and control. If you find you’re needing a more controlled smooth line, turn the line smoothing way up and this will help with slow controlled drawing.

    I use Procreate on almost a daily basis professionally and it’s fantastic. I think a big part of their success is that the UI gets out of your way and just let’s you create (not unlike bram’s apps).

    @no1normal Ive heard the matte screen protectors wear down the nib of the pencil, is there a significant amount of wear or does it still last a long while?

    Only had the screen protector on for a couple of weeks (used daily but not professionally) so its too early to see any wear on the pencil. So far, so good tho... It adds a nice amount of resistance to the glass (paperlike)

    Awesome thanks, I’ve watched a few reviews now and I think I’m gonna try it out. :)

  • Never heard of Paperlike before, but I’ll be nabbing it. :astonished: I stopped using ProCreate and went traditional for a bit due to the lack of friction of the iPad screen, but this could damn well be the ticket. Thanks @BiancaNeve :)

  • Love procreate. Never really noticed the difference in feel, but I hadn't done much drawing in years. Doing lots now. The pencil nibs are replaceable.

  • It may sound a bit counterintuitive but I find using a satin stripper glove (with the index finger and thumb cut out), allows my hand to glide around on the glass better, which actually helps control a lot. When my palm had friction but the pencil had none there was an imbalance. By reducing the friction of my palm I then get less slippage from the pressure I am exterting with my fingers and it becomes far more about wrist gesture than finger/thumb control.

    I recommend everyone drawing on glass try it.

  • @AudioGus said:
    I find using a satin stripper glove (with the index finger and thumb cut out), allows my hand to glide around

    Why stop at stripper gloves? Why not go for the full stripper outfit?

  • i always found using that kind of glove obligatory for penciling and inking on bristol board tbh. During penciling it reduces smearing and during inking it helps with longer strokes of the pen/brush.

  • @no1normal said:
    My other half is learning pro create and had the same problem till we got a paper-like screen protector. It feels matte to the touch and makes all the difference apparently.
    https://paperlike.com/

    I’m not affiliated, just thought I’d log back in for brambos cos you are a legend ;-)

    My wife picked up a Pro + Pencil not too long ago and is also learning Procreate so I've sent her the paperlike link, thanks to all who have mentioned it. I think she'll like it. She may not like that I pointed out how much money in alcohol ink and similar real supplies she had vs being able to do almost exactly the same thing digitally the first day she had the new setup, though ;) But it is the truth - she was able to do some really great work right out of the box with just the iPad Pro, Pencil, and Procreate. I think she'll LOVE Paperlike.

    Thanks for the tips in this thread which I've relayed along to her.

  • @brambos said:

    @AudioGus said:
    I find using a satin stripper glove (with the index finger and thumb cut out), allows my hand to glide around

    Why stop at stripper gloves? Why not go for the full stripper outfit?

    I highly doubt anyone wants to see that. :lol:

  • First off, I was somewhat dismissive of the Apple Pencil at first. And, for detail selection, basic drawing, writing, photo editing, etc. I think my old Adonit Jot Pro (non-Bluetooth) stylus performs plenty adequately.

    However, I got an Apple Pencil as a gift and yes... it’s a whole other level of joy... particularly with painting stuff. The pressure sensitivity for burning/dodging light in photos in Affinity is spectacular too.

    I felt the tactile experience was awkward at first, but I eventually just got used to it. Now, when I draw on paper with the tactile resistance, THAT now feels odd and the glass iPad Pro surface is what feels more natural. Strange.

    When my wife hands me a card to sign for someone’s birthday, etc. I try to make a little drawing inside the card to go with the note. I’ve noticed the more I use the Apple Pencil, the more my penmanship and paper drawing skills deteriorate a little.

  • @ikmultimedia said:

    @no1normal said:
    My other half is learning pro create and had the same problem till we got a paper-like screen protector. It feels matte to the touch and makes all the difference apparently.
    https://paperlike.com/

    I’m not affiliated, just thought I’d log back in for brambos cos you are a legend ;-)

    My wife picked up a Pro + Pencil not too long ago and is also learning Procreate so I've sent her the paperlike link, thanks to all who have mentioned it. I think she'll like it. She may not like that I pointed out how much money in alcohol ink and similar real supplies she had vs being able to do almost exactly the same thing digitally the first day she had the new setup, though ;) But it is the truth - she was able to do some really great work right out of the box with just the iPad Pro, Pencil, and Procreate. I think she'll LOVE Paperlike.

    Thanks for the tips in this thread which I've relayed along to her.

    @ikmultimedia said:

    @no1normal said:
    My other half is learning pro create and had the same problem till we got a paper-like screen protector. It feels matte to the touch and makes all the difference apparently.
    https://paperlike.com/

    I’m not affiliated, just thought I’d log back in for brambos cos you are a legend ;-)

    My wife picked up a Pro + Pencil not too long ago and is also learning Procreate so I've sent her the paperlike link, thanks to all who have mentioned it. I think she'll like it. She may not like that I pointed out how much money in alcohol ink and similar real supplies she had vs being able to do almost exactly the same thing digitally the first day she had the new setup, though ;) But it is the truth - she was able to do some really great work right out of the box with just the iPad Pro, Pencil, and Procreate. I think she'll LOVE Paperlike.

    Thanks for the tips in this thread which I've relayed along to her.

    No worries! I can recommend the quality of ikmultimedia products too as my studio has loads of useful bits I’ve acquired from you guys over the years starting from my iPad stand. Got the selfie stick which is also solid...

    Now my mobile iOS rig is built around the iRig Pro Duo and a USB hub running up to 4 midi controllers... One of which happens to be an iRIG Keys which is very useful too!

    I still need to register the amp software that came freewith this sound card but I’m more of a DJ than guitarist so never did...

    Apologies to hi jack this thread, this has just lead me to realise I’ve lost the box (more likely in the shed but it’s freezing and can’t dig it out).

    Does anyone know a way I can register this sound card with ikmultimedia, with the aim of trying out the free software that came free with it...using just the serial number on the unit please ?

    All the best

  • @jwmmakerofmusic said:

    @brambos said:

    @AudioGus said:
    I find using a satin stripper glove (with the index finger and thumb cut out), allows my hand to glide around

    Why stop at stripper gloves? Why not go for the full stripper outfit?

    I highly doubt anyone wants to see that. :lol:

    I'm actually pretty sexy.

  • @AudioGus said:

    @jwmmakerofmusic said:

    @brambos said:

    @AudioGus said:
    I find using a satin stripper glove (with the index finger and thumb cut out), allows my hand to glide around

    Why stop at stripper gloves? Why not go for the full stripper outfit?

    I highly doubt anyone wants to see that. :lol:

    I'm actually pretty sexy.

    Really?

    Okay, I’ll leave it up to public opinion. :lol:

    (And yes, I used ProCreate to take the piss outta ya. :wink: )

  • edited March 3

    @AudioGus said:

    You actually look like a combo of a porn producer and a Las Vegas card dealer with a pinch of 2003 Harrison Ford.

  • @AudioGus said:
    It may sound a bit counterintuitive but I find using a satin stripper glove (with the index finger and thumb cut out), allows my hand to glide around on the glass better, which actually helps control a lot. When my palm had friction but the pencil had none there was an imbalance. By reducing the friction of my palm I then get less slippage from the pressure I am exterting with my fingers and it becomes far more about wrist gesture than finger/thumb control.

    I recommend everyone drawing on glass try it.

    That is quite clever. I am going to try that out. I got the stripper gloves, now I just need a Pro and a Pencil. B)

  • @jwmmakerofmusic said:

    @AudioGus said:

    You actually look like a combo of a porn producer and a Las Vegas card dealer with a pinch of 2003 Harrison Ford.

    Sigh, if only.

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