Best Music/Audio/Sound documentarys

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  • Sound City, Chasing Trane.

  • I’ve watched Amy on Amazon Prime recently and thought it was well made.

  • edited February 17

    This prompted a fascinating realization.

    Movies about music for some reason leave me cold. Outside of “The Kids Are Alright,” which I saw as an enormous Who fan as a kid (it’s the only funny music documentary I can name offhand), I can think of only one music doc that I love:
    “Beware of Mr. Baker” — fantastic movie.

    Others? They all seem boring to me. Even “Stop Making Sense,” which is so formally inventive, and the musicians are amazing — I liked it but I wouldn’t watch it twice.

    It seems to me that filmmakers just kind of don’t get musicians. Music for them seems to be some kind of mysterious, mystical ritual that can only be portrayed as some alchemical moment. it’s always so damn serious!
    (Or to get the movie made, the filmmaker has to devote a lot of time to the artist’s recent, less interesting career, which is the problem with “The Future Is Unwritten,” a very watchable documentary about Joe Strummer, my hero.)

    Thank you for starting this thread. It really got me thinking.

    EDIT: Oh, just remembered two more. “Dig!” about the Brian Jonestown Massacre, which really nails the competition among bands who are friends and then not friends.

    “Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me.”

  • Great Rock and Roll Swindle :D

  • edited February 17

    Soundbreaking is a really well made 8 part series.

    Thanks all for the recommendations..

  • Ken Burns jazz. Jazz is the best music.

  • edited February 17

    @SealTeamSick said:
    Ken Burns jazz. Jazz is the best music.

    Great to watch and it really holds up just listening to it too.

  • edited February 17

    BBC Radiophonic Workshop: The Alchemists Of Sound

    http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x5579ti

    My favorite.

  • ‘Score’ is worth watching.

  • @AudioGus said:
    BBC Radiophonic Workshop: The Alchemists Of Sound

    http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x5579ti

    My favorite.

    Shit that looks awesome!

  • Throw Down Your Heart
    How Music Works by Howard Goodall
    I Dream Of Wires
    The Musical Instinct - BBC, PBS
    Musicwood
    It Might Get Loud
    Eric Clapton: a life in 12 bars

  • Here is a great intro to music concepts that is perfect for the little ones. :)

    Sorry it continues here. Make sure you catch the most important final lesson here.
    Dang man, RIP G-clef! That dude was one of the greatest musical talents, ever.

  • @CracklePot said:

    This is a great documentary. Who knew that Wakeman was such a comedian. He said that he bought his first Mini Moog from an actor who said that it didn’t work. What was wrong with it? It only played one note at a time.

  • Musically Mad - A Documentary on UK Reggae Soundsystems.

  • @gusgranite said:
    Musically Mad - A Documentary on UK Reggae Soundsystems.

    Oh F*CK YEAH! This is right up my alley, and I ain’t seen this one! @gusgranite, thanks man, you rock! B)

  • Here is a link to a thread containing links to all 8 parts of the Soundbreaking series. I checked and all episodes are still alive. This has to be one of, if not the best series on modern music from the past half century or so. I am hoping to find more docs in this thread that I haven’t seen. Great thread. B)

    https://forum.audiob.us/discussion/22643/soundbreaking-stories-from-the-cutting-edge-of-recorded-music#latest

  • @AudioGus said:
    BBC Radiophonic Workshop: The Alchemists Of Sound

    http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x5579ti

    My favorite.

    Doubleplus!

  • This was earlier posted here, but this keep a stunning and very complete docu about British electronic music pioneers.

    Documentary following a generation of post-punk musicians who took the synthesiser from the experimental fringes to the centre of the pop stage. In the late 1970s, small pockets of electronic artists including the Human League, Daniel Miller and Cabaret Volatire were inspired by Kraftwerk and JG Ballard and dreamt of the sound of the future against the backdrop of bleak, high-rise Britain. The crossover moment came in 1979 when Gary Numan's appearance on Top of the Pops with Tubeway Army's Are Friends Electric heralded the arrival of synthpop. Four lads from Basildon known as Depeche Mode would come to own the new sound whilst post-punk bands like Ultravox, Soft Cell, OMD and Yazoo took the synth out of the pages of the NME and onto the front page of Smash Hits. By 1983, acts like Pet Shop Boys and New Order were showing that the future of electronic music would lie in dance music

  • edited February 17

    Ghengis Blues - 1999 Amazing doc. Blind American man who wrote "Jet Airliner" discovered Tuvan throat singing and became one of the best.

  • @dougdi said:
    Ghengis Blues - 1999 Amazing doc. Blind American man who wrote "Jet Airliner" discovered Tuvan throat singing and became one of the best.

    Yes, that is a great one.

  • Dig! (full movie)

    Beware of Mr. Baker (full movie)

  • Searching for Sugarman

  • @ExAsperis99 said:
    This prompted a fascinating realization.

    Movies about music for some reason leave me cold. Outside of “The Kids Are Alright,” which I saw as an enormous Who fan as a kid (it’s the only funny music documentary I can name offhand), I can think of only one music doc that I love:
    “Beware of Mr. Baker” — fantastic movie.

    Others? They all seem boring to me. Even “Stop Making Sense,” which is so formally inventive, and the musicians are amazing — I liked it but I wouldn’t watch it twice.

    It seems to me that filmmakers just kind of don’t get musicians. Music for them seems to be some kind of mysterious, mystical ritual that can only be portrayed as some alchemical moment. it’s always so damn serious!
    (Or to get the movie made, the filmmaker has to devote a lot of time to the artist’s recent, less interesting career, which is the problem with “The Future Is Unwritten,” a very watchable documentary about Joe Strummer, my hero.)

    Thank you for starting this thread. It really got me thinking.

    EDIT: Oh, just remembered two more. “Dig!” about the Brian Jonestown Massacre, which really nails the competition among bands who are friends and then not friends.

    “Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me.”

    I feel the same way. There is one exception however.. A weird and crazy side project of Les Claypool which takes the Spinal Tap (not a massive fan of that by the way - same reasons) formula and fills is with so many in jokes and crazy themes that only real music geeks will understand. 'Electric Apricot - The Quest For Festeroo'.

  • One of the best documentaries (2001) about the history of hiphop (turntablism). You will soon realize hiphop is all about having fun.

  • Muscle Shoals
    Wrecking Crew
    Hired Gun
    40 Feet From Stardom

  • I really enjoyed The Defiant Ones on HBO about dr Dre and jimmy iovine. Lots of artists pop up in there as well between their two stories

  • @ExAsperis99 said:
    Dig! (full movie)

    Beware of Mr. Baker (full movie)

    Both of those are great.

  • Great topic, cant wait to watch some of these
    Wildstyle
    Rudeboy

    Outta compton
    I agree with Dig!, Howard Goodall and Ginger Baker. Great stuff
    I love watching the Can DVD box set live performances.
    What about 'Inside Llewyn Davis' and most important 'Whiplash'

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