Audiobus: Use your music apps together.

What is Audiobus?Audiobus is an award-winning music app for iPhone and iPad which lets you use your other music apps together. Chain effects on your favourite synth, run the output of apps or Audio Units into an app like GarageBand or Loopy, or select a different audio interface output for each app. Route MIDI between apps — drive a synth from a MIDI sequencer, or add an arpeggiator to your MIDI keyboard — or sync with your external MIDI gear. And control your entire setup from a MIDI controller.

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OT: Observations

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Comments

  • Wow. Thank you. I found that strangely/sadly powerful.

  • edited March 11

    We all have slow days...

    “my typewriter had turned mute as a tomb,
    and my piano crouched in the corner of my room with all its teeth bared”

    Nick Cave

  • I have lived through those same days, mr cave.

  • edited March 30

    Good intro to the Curtis back-cat (with some context) for those of us who need it:

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2020/mar/30/curtis-mayfield-where-to-start-in-his-back-catalogue

  • @JohnnyGoodyear said:
    Good intro to the Curtis back-cat (with some context) for those of us who need it:

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2020/mar/30/curtis-mayfield-where-to-start-in-his-back-catalogue

    I'm a Curtis nut, have been since the early 90's, and for me his best period by far is between 1970 to 1974, every album in that spell is great. I'm not so keen on the stuff that came after though, despite the heroic efforts he made to keep writing after his tragic accident.

    Albums I would recommend:

    Curtis
    Roots
    SuperFly
    Sweet Exorcist

    But a compilation that focuses on this period would also work 👍

    Also, on a related note, if you have Spotify then you might like this playlist of 70s soul and funk, with all my favourite highlights:

    https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1kS8eV47r3NSxU2GZIJw45?si=wC1GPTwMRHytvCIiyUBNtw

    If you like I can make a Spotify playlist of all my favourite Curtis tracks.

  • @richardyot said:

    @JohnnyGoodyear said:
    Good intro to the Curtis back-cat (with some context) for those of us who need it:

    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2020/mar/30/curtis-mayfield-where-to-start-in-his-back-catalogue

    I'm a Curtis nut, have been since the early 90's, and for me his best period by far is between 1970 to 1974, every album in that spell is great. I'm not so keen on the stuff that came after though, despite the heroic efforts he made to keep writing after his tragic accident.

    Albums I would recommend:

    Curtis
    Roots
    SuperFly
    Sweet Exorcist

    But a compilation that focuses on this period would also work 👍

    Also, on a related note, if you have Spotify then you might like this playlist of 70s soul and funk, with all my favourite highlights:

    https://open.spotify.com/playlist/1kS8eV47r3NSxU2GZIJw45?si=wC1GPTwMRHytvCIiyUBNtw

    If you like I can make a Spotify playlist of all my favourite Curtis tracks.

    Very interesting. For years I think I had him (and his product) confused with Bobby Womack. Weirdly I came to grips with Curtis (in terms of sitting down and listening to a whole album like what we once did etc) by getting into New World Order when it came out WITHOUT knowing any of the 'he had to sing it line by line while lying on his back'-story.

    I would really like your fave tracks list. We have a Spotify account that I have never used (odd Luddite area of my tendencies), but this might be a good way to lose my cherry etc. How about this: Top eight tunes first Desert Island Discs style :)

  • Top 8 tracks, in no particular order:

    Little Child, Running Wild
    Pusherman
    Move On Up
    Do Do Wap Is Strong In Here
    (Don't Worry) If There's A Hell Below
    Hard Times*
    Superfly
    Beautiful Brother Of Mine

    *(a cover of the Baby Huey track)

  • In YT format:

  • @richardyot Thank you very much Skipper. Tipping with rain here, supposed to storm all day and night, but it will be funky....

  • And a bonus track :)

  • The Rabbit Hole.

    This guy's interesting in places and inspiring in others. I'm putting it here initially for @richardyot (and as an aide-memoire for myself), but also as a nudge for anyone else who's passing now or then:

    https://blas.com

  • @JohnnyGoodyear said:
    The Rabbit Hole.

    This guy's interesting in places and inspiring in others. I'm putting it here initially for @richardyot (and as an aide-memoire for myself), but also as a nudge for anyone else who's passing now or then:

    https://blas.com

    That is a rabbit hole indeed... Thanks (I think?).

  • “A great nation is not saved by wars, it is saved….by speaking, writing, voting reasonably; by smiting corruption swiftly; by good temper between parties; by the people knowing true men when they see them, and preferring them as leaders to rabid partisans or empty quacks. This is the behavior that monuments should honor."

    -William James (on the dedication of a monument to Robert Gould Shaw)

  • edited April 5

    More unmissable Curtis.

  • That smile on your face, is sweet, sweet murder.

  • edited April 6

    I like the Roman emperor part of this very much. Actually, I like the whole thing and drop it here in case it's off use to anyone else today. It's extracted from David Cain's blog here.

    All problems exist within a context that dwarfs them, but often we’re too close to see it. You may have once been so stressed about a high school exam that your future seemed to hinge on its outcome. Looking back on your whole life, however, it will barely register as an important event. You may have experienced breakups that seemed like the end of the world, and which you haven’t had a single thought about for several years.

    Worry requires this narrow, fixated view to remain overwhelming. In fact, maybe worry is only the feeling of having your attention zoomed so far into your Current Big Problem that it fills your mental viewfinder. If you’re too close to see the edges of a problem, you lose the sense that there’s anything outside of it, before it, or after it.

    This suffocating feeling is nature’s crude way of getting us to do everything we can. When that happens, you can create bit of air by zooming out, and including in your viewscreen some of what’s happening beyond your worries – which is almost everything, as it turns out.

    The ancient Stoics had a reliable way of doing this, using a thought exercise called The View From Above.

    You begin with your current viewpoint, which is from where you’re sitting now, however consumed by worry you are.

    Then you imagine looking down on your worried self from the corner of the room. Already there’s more in the picture. There’s a person, fretting over possibilities, but also furniture, houseplants, books, curtains, framed photos of family members.

    Then you pan out farther, looking through the window at your small, worried self sitting in one of the building’s many rooms. Moving outward again, you view the building from above the street, where other people and their worried thoughts are passing.

    Each time you move outward, you take a moment to appreciate how much else is going on, feeling the scale of the context your worries exist in. In parallel with this moment of your own life, your neighbor is feeding the fish. A passer-by is ruminating about his relationship. In the park three blocks from you, a boy is trying to keep perfectly still as he watches a woodpecker hunt for invisible bugs.

    You continue zooming out slowly and incrementally, appreciating the abundance of activity taking place in the surrounding block, city, county, and countryside, including wildlife, rivers, hills, and so on, never losing sight of the fact that your worries are a part of this.

    You continue to rise, now seeing flocks of migratory birds, highways, coastlines, container ships. Cropland, mountains, deserts, rainforests.

    Soon you can hold in your view the entire Earth, a blue orb decorated by swirls of cloud. Everything that happens in the human world is happening in there somewhere. Babies are being born, fields are being tilled, puddles are being jumped over, dumbbells are being hoisted, windows are being gazed out longingly, dogs are being belly-rubbed, and every emotion is being felt. Somewhere among them is your current mental monologue and an accompanying spurt of cortisol.

    From here you begin your return journey, down through the clouds again, to see your city growing closer. Your street comes into view, then your home, your room, your chair, and you sitting in it. Finally you return to your current state of mind, which is still important, and still unresolved, but it no longer feels like absolutely important.

    This exercise is derived from three brilliant passages in Marcus Aurelius’s The Meditations. It’s best done slowly. There’s a guided version here on YouTube.

    The View From Above is even more powerful when you imagine all the other people throughout history who have used it. You’re sitting in your 21st century living room, contemplating the ocean of time and space your worries are bobbing in. Some distance from you—ten thousand miles away, and 1800 years in the past—a Roman emperor is feeling the same relief from contemplating that exact same ocean.

  • @JohnnyGoodyear said:
    I like the Roman emperor part of this very much. Actually, I like the whole thing and drop it here in case it's off use to anyone else today. It's extracted from David Cain's blog here.

    All problems exist within a context that dwarfs them, but often we’re too close to see it. You may have once been so stressed about a high school exam that your future seemed to hinge on its outcome. Looking back on your whole life, however, it will barely register as an important event. You may have experienced breakups that seemed like the end of the world, and which you haven’t had a single thought about for several years.

    Worry requires this narrow, fixated view to remain overwhelming. In fact, maybe worry is only the feeling of having your attention zoomed so far into your Current Big Problem that it fills your mental viewfinder. If you’re too close to see the edges of a problem, you lose the sense that there’s anything outside of it, before it, or after it.

    This suffocating feeling is nature’s crude way of getting us to do everything we can. When that happens, you can create bit of air by zooming out, and including in your viewscreen some of what’s happening beyond your worries – which is almost everything, as it turns out.

    The ancient Stoics had a reliable way of doing this, using a thought exercise called The View From Above.

    You begin with your current viewpoint, which is from where you’re sitting now, however consumed by worry you are.

    Then you imagine looking down on your worried self from the corner of the room. Already there’s more in the picture. There’s a person, fretting over possibilities, but also furniture, houseplants, books, curtains, framed photos of family members.

    Then you pan out farther, looking through the window at your small, worried self sitting in one of the building’s many rooms. Moving outward again, you view the building from above the street, where other people and their worried thoughts are passing.

    Each time you move outward, you take a moment to appreciate how much else is going on, feeling the scale of the context your worries exist in. In parallel with this moment of your own life, your neighbor is feeding the fish. A passer-by is ruminating about his relationship. In the park three blocks from you, a boy is trying to keep perfectly still as he watches a woodpecker hunt for invisible bugs.

    You continue zooming out slowly and incrementally, appreciating the abundance of activity taking place in the surrounding block, city, county, and countryside, including wildlife, rivers, hills, and so on, never losing sight of the fact that your worries are a part of this.

    You continue to rise, now seeing flocks of migratory birds, highways, coastlines, container ships. Cropland, mountains, deserts, rainforests.

    Soon you can hold in your view the entire Earth, a blue orb decorated by swirls of cloud. Everything that happens in the human world is happening in there somewhere. Babies are being born, fields are being tilled, puddles are being jumped over, dumbbells are being hoisted, windows are being gazed out longingly, dogs are being belly-rubbed, and every emotion is being felt. Somewhere among them is your current mental monologue and an accompanying spurt of cortisol.

    From here you begin your return journey, down through the clouds again, to see your city growing closer. Your street comes into view, then your home, your room, your chair, and you sitting in it. Finally you return to your current state of mind, which is still important, and still unresolved, but it no longer feels like absolutely important.

    This exercise is derived from three brilliant passages in Marcus Aurelius’s The Meditations. It’s best done slowly. There’s a guided version here on YouTube.

    The View From Above is even more powerful when you imagine all the other people throughout history who have used it. You’re sitting in your 21st century living room, contemplating the ocean of time and space your worries are bobbing in. Some distance from you—ten thousand miles away, and 1800 years in the past—a Roman emperor is feeling the same relief from contemplating that exact same ocean.

    I think in the current climate zooming out might not be the best plan...

  • @MonzoPro said:
    I think in the current climate zooming out might not be the best plan...

    I hear you, but actually I find the concept very calming. A few minutes of context seems to help the day. Not so much (currently) as regards the way of the world but more helping to diminish some of my smaller commercial concerns within it etc.

  • I dunno. Maybe it's instructive to zoom out now. Just not physically.

  • @lukesleepwalker said:
    I dunno. Maybe it's instructive to zoom out now. Just not physically.

    Agreed. Already feels like an age since I zoomed out physically. Might have to start a Fight Club of one.

  • edited April 6

    @JohnnyGoodyear said:

    @MonzoPro said:
    I think in the current climate zooming out might not be the best plan...

    I hear you, but actually I find the concept very calming. A few minutes of context seems to help the day. Not so much (currently) as regards the way of the world but more helping to diminish some of my smaller commercial concerns within it etc.

    Nah. I can deal with the stuff inside, since most of that I can control. Outside the front door, down the street, the county, the UK, the planet...there be dragons.

    I’m fully aware of my minuscule place in the scheme of things. But inner space is my safety cupboard for the time being.

  • @MonzoPro said:

    @JohnnyGoodyear said:

    @MonzoPro said:
    I think in the current climate zooming out might not be the best plan...

    I hear you, but actually I find the concept very calming. A few minutes of context seems to help the day. Not so much (currently) as regards the way of the world but more helping to diminish some of my smaller commercial concerns within it etc.

    Nah. I can deal with the stuff inside, since most of that I can control. Outside the front door, down the street, the county, the UK, the planet...there be dragons.

    I’m fully aware of my minuscule place in the scheme of things. But inner space is my safety cupboard for the time being.

    Whatever gets us through the fright :)

  • @JohnnyGoodyear said:

    @MonzoPro said:

    @JohnnyGoodyear said:

    @MonzoPro said:
    I think in the current climate zooming out might not be the best plan...

    I hear you, but actually I find the concept very calming. A few minutes of context seems to help the day. Not so much (currently) as regards the way of the world but more helping to diminish some of my smaller commercial concerns within it etc.

    Nah. I can deal with the stuff inside, since most of that I can control. Outside the front door, down the street, the county, the UK, the planet...there be dragons.

    I’m fully aware of my minuscule place in the scheme of things. But inner space is my safety cupboard for the time being.

    Whatever gets us through the fright :)

    I'm not that fussed at the moment as it happens. Working from home, not going anywhere - that's my normal. I've read a lot of positive articles and news items that make things feel a lot less scary than they did two weeks ago when I was tetchy and anxious, and we managed to source a big sack of spuds last week to keep my Irish diet in check.

    I've been thinking about my age a lot recently, and it's not like I've got that many healthy years ahead anyway, so if the virus gets me then it'll just nip a few years off the end and maybe spare me from going through something much worse and painful. And I'm actually enjoying a lot of the time we're all having cooped up together. Family time, time to reflect and enjoy.

    As long as my friends and family stay safe, that'll do for me. Everything else is just external stuff. Cherish these times.

  • @MonzoPro said:

    @JohnnyGoodyear said:

    @MonzoPro said:

    @JohnnyGoodyear said:

    @MonzoPro said:
    I think in the current climate zooming out might not be the best plan...

    I hear you, but actually I find the concept very calming. A few minutes of context seems to help the day. Not so much (currently) as regards the way of the world but more helping to diminish some of my smaller commercial concerns within it etc.

    Nah. I can deal with the stuff inside, since most of that I can control. Outside the front door, down the street, the county, the UK, the planet...there be dragons.

    I’m fully aware of my minuscule place in the scheme of things. But inner space is my safety cupboard for the time being.

    Whatever gets us through the fright :)

    I'm not that fussed at the moment as it happens. Working from home, not going anywhere - that's my normal. I've read a lot of positive articles and news items that make things feel a lot less scary than they did two weeks ago when I was tetchy and anxious, and we managed to source a big sack of spuds last week to keep my Irish diet in check.

    I've been thinking about my age a lot recently, and it's not like I've got that many healthy years ahead anyway, so if the virus gets me then it'll just nip a few years off the end and maybe spare me from going through something much worse and painful. And I'm actually enjoying a lot of the time we're all having cooped up together. Family time, time to reflect and enjoy.

    As long as my friends and family stay safe, that'll do for me. Everything else is just external stuff. Cherish these times.

    Agreed mate. Not bothered much about the self, been dead and back already. I am concerned about Sister and Mother in the middle-of-nowhere Spain though, which is actually a pretty strategic place to be (given that Spain isn't etc etc)....my worry to be honest is for my Sister, because she's the lone carer etc, so if she goes down, ooff....and I'm not sure Malaga's taking too many planes from Texas about now :) Just got to plod on through the next few weeks....

  • @JohnnyGoodyear said:

    @MonzoPro said:

    @JohnnyGoodyear said:

    @MonzoPro said:

    @JohnnyGoodyear said:

    @MonzoPro said:
    I think in the current climate zooming out might not be the best plan...

    I hear you, but actually I find the concept very calming. A few minutes of context seems to help the day. Not so much (currently) as regards the way of the world but more helping to diminish some of my smaller commercial concerns within it etc.

    Nah. I can deal with the stuff inside, since most of that I can control. Outside the front door, down the street, the county, the UK, the planet...there be dragons.

    I’m fully aware of my minuscule place in the scheme of things. But inner space is my safety cupboard for the time being.

    Whatever gets us through the fright :)

    I'm not that fussed at the moment as it happens. Working from home, not going anywhere - that's my normal. I've read a lot of positive articles and news items that make things feel a lot less scary than they did two weeks ago when I was tetchy and anxious, and we managed to source a big sack of spuds last week to keep my Irish diet in check.

    I've been thinking about my age a lot recently, and it's not like I've got that many healthy years ahead anyway, so if the virus gets me then it'll just nip a few years off the end and maybe spare me from going through something much worse and painful. And I'm actually enjoying a lot of the time we're all having cooped up together. Family time, time to reflect and enjoy.

    As long as my friends and family stay safe, that'll do for me. Everything else is just external stuff. Cherish these times.

    Agreed mate. Not bothered much about the self, been dead and back already. I am concerned about Sister and Mother in the middle-of-nowhere Spain though, which is actually a pretty strategic place to be (given that Spain isn't etc etc)....my worry to be honest is for my Sister, because she's the lone carer etc, so if she goes down, ooff....and I'm not sure Malaga's taking too many planes from Texas about now :) Just got to plod on through the next few weeks....

    Hope she’s ok. Not too optimistic about my sister, as she’s just recovering from lung cancer - but who knows, we’re living in strange times so anything’s possible.

  • Just as an aside
    I’ve noticed this YouTube poster / channel has lately been pumping a prolific amount of quite interesting records up to YouTube, and a lot of them are probably the sort of thing that people who like the sort of thing I like would like.

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqUYPpelv2G8g2ILhxGtyag

  • This is someone I know's current top ten on shuffle. Apart from Nick and Lenny I'm pretty much lost. Any clues?

    i. Vincenzo Bellini’s aria Tu sola, o mia Giulietta … Deh! tu, bell’anima from I Capuleti e i Montecchi (Joyce DiDonato, Riccardo Minasi, Orchestre de l’Opéra Nationial de Lyon)

    ii. Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds’ God Is in the House from the album No More Shall We Part

    iii. Lucilla Galeazzi’s Quante stelle nel cielo con la luna

    iv. Jean-Philippe Rameau’s Prélude from Hippolyte et Aricie’s third act (Christophe Rousset, Les Talens Lyriques)

    v. The entirety of Ottorino Respighi’s Trittico Botticelliano, and in particular the sensuous third movement, La nascida di Venere (Salvatore di Vittorio, Chamber Orchestra of New York)

    vi. Claude Debussy’s Mes longs cheveux from Pelléas et Mélisande (Barbara Hannigan, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Philharmonia Orchestra)

    vii. Roccu Mambrini’s Lamentu di Ghjesu (sopra La Follia) (Barbara Furtuna, L’Arpeggiata)

    viii. Leonard Cohen’s Joan of Arc from the album Songs of Love and Hate

    ix. Claudio Monteverdi’s aria Addio Roma from L’incoronazione di Poppea (Jennifer Larmore, René Jacobs)

    x. Luciano Berio’s arrangement of Azerbaijan Love Song from the song cycle Folk Songs (Anna Stéphany, Labyrinth Ensemble)

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