OT: Why Is Modern Pop Music So Terrible? (Video by Thoughty2)

I've been following Thoughty2 since his interesting video on Whittier, Alaska. As I checked my Youtube feed, I saw he made a commentary on modern pop music.

https://youtu.be/oVME_l4IwII

He doesn't poke fun of it nor any of that. He simply states his opinions and backs them up with facts. Cheers.

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Comments

  • Pop music generally is. Mass produced slops for people that don't really like music.

  • Why Is Modern Pop Music So Terrible?

    Because you're listening to the terrible modern pop music. Try listening to the good stuff.

  • It's usually about money, puppetry, idol worship, and mass brain washing and if there's time some music thrown in by chance

  • The morass of choice today causes a kind of impotence of creativity, leading to a bleak sanitised future.

  • I loved the Pop music in the 80 to mid 90´s (i recently got a flashback and damn how i miss this time now).
    But what we like or liked has nothing to do with newer generations.
    There is a lot good music today too.....just seems harder to find.
    Sounds like cliche´but there was and will ever be only one king of pop for me (yeah it was my time).

  • Well, I may as well state my opinion on modern pop. Most of it is pure "dumb fun" manufactured cheese, but as always, there are major exceptions (at least as far as songs that didn't repulse me upon first listen). One of them is Sia. She has penned some really great tunes for herself and others. "Chandelier" and "Alive" are monumental (at least compared to most other modern pop).

    Clean Bandit's "Rockabye" is another example, where the lyrics, while simplistic, tell the story of a single mother raising her child. Unusual subject matter for a chart topping hit.

    Of course, modern EDM has pretty much fallen into the same trap of manufactured shite (and, no, that's not a pun for Trap music). In other words - Future Bass. Pretty much every Future Bass track released either on Spinnin or elsewhere is shite. Even with a couple of repeat listens, that psychological effect of "starting to like it instead" didn't sink in. (I'm sure there are exceptions, but I haven't found any yet.)

    (Sidenote: No wonder KSHMR defected from Spinnin and started Dharma Records. He's sticking to his signature sounds without compromising anything.)

  • @jwmmakerofmusic said:
    Well, I may as well state my opinion on modern pop. Most of it is pure "dumb fun" manufactured cheese, but as always, there are major exceptions (at least as far as songs that didn't repulse me upon first listen). One of them is Sia. She has penned some really great tunes for herself and others. "Chandelier" and "Alive" are monumental (at least compared to most other modern pop).

    Clean Bandit's "Rockabye" is another example, where the lyrics, while simplistic, tell the story of a single mother raising her child. Unusual subject matter for a chart topping hit.

    Of course, modern EDM has pretty much fallen into the same trap of manufactured shite (and, no, that's not a pun for Trap music). In other words - Future Bass. Pretty much every Future Bass track released either on Spinnin or elsewhere is shite. Even with a couple of repeat listens, that psychological effect of "starting to like it instead" didn't sink in. (I'm sure there are exceptions, but I haven't found any yet.)

    (Sidenote: No wonder KSHMR defected from Spinnin and started Dharma Records. He's sticking to his signature sounds without compromising anything.)

    Agree wholeheartedly with all the comments in this thread more or less. A lot of it is money driven. If a sound seems to work for an artist they will repeat it to try and mimic the same success rather than necessarily take creative risks. Other labels will then follow suit seeing how well received a sound has driven streams.
    Then all the sample houses copy the beats and the groove and sell that on to producers and it just becomes a complete cycle of rehashed sounds.
    There is great talent out there though. There's just a lot of noise to cut through before you hear it.

  • I've always dug deep to find the stuff that suits me. Used to be via friends and festivals, lately Soundcloud Groups (now defunct), and mostly now via mags such as The Wire, and general YouTube meandering.

    Generally if something is liked by the masses, then it ain't for me.

  • I don't think there's anything new in this video about the trend in popular music being driven by marketing, economics, and trying to use psychology to sell products. He does explain what's happened very well.

    Music videos, iPods, and online music have all accelerated these trends.

    The flip side is that it's easier than ever for people to record and distribute their music. Getting their music heard or making a living from it can certainly be a different story. In general I think there's a polarization where there are a small pool of pop musicians based upon a large capital investment from music companies including multimedia marketing which are quite different from musicians who rely upon a more narrowly focused fan base.

    I think the degree to which we'll see more innovative artists or artists who operate outside the corporate music formulas will be directly dependent upon the extent to which the public supports their efforts. Performing at smaller live venues which appeal to people who don't want a rehashing of current pop music sensibilities may be a viable option.

    Perhaps over time online distribution sources may be a viable option. Expectations for low cost or no cost music options are working against their development. SoundCloud's turn around on their approach highlights the challenge of developing alternative music distribution channels where pop music economics continue to determine how decisions are made.

  • I agree on Sia. I like it. Also the videos are a kind of art. Like many was in the 80's and 90's. That's a bit lost today.

  • @Jocphone said:

    Why Is Modern Pop Music So Terrible?

    Because you're listening to the terrible modern pop music. Try listening to the good stuff.

  • edited August 7

    I kinda like it.

    I listened to Psy's Gangnam Style over and over when I first heard it. It made me laugh. Part of what makes it enjoyable is how ridiculous it is. Megan Trainer, or whatever her name is... has thing song about "if I was you I'd wanna be me too" so ridiculous. worthless message. I listen to laugh at her... and for the bass line.

    Then at the other end of the spectrum there is Bastille's Pompeii. It was popular for a while, but I don't think anyone knew what it was about. Maybe they liked the tune, or the European accent.
    but it has some rich song writing. Historical, thought provoking, not very deep, but not terrible either.

  • Thinking of the venues, now rubble or worse, a lot were dark, grotty, run down places, but they were alive, thriving to the pulse of a youthful generation. How things change.

  • edited August 7

    @MonzoPro said:
    Pop music generally is. Mass produced slops for people that don't really like music.

    Agree. So much if what is rammed into ears via the likes of Radio 1 is mass market made to templates, overproduced and totally imagination free.

  • edited August 7

    Clear Channel Communications is the number one radio station owner in the U.S. "Clear Channel owns, operates, programs, or sells airtime for nearly 1,200 radio stations; it also has equity interests in 240 international stations. Clear Channel owns a 90% stake in one of the world's largest outdoor advertising companies, Clear Channel Outdoor Holdings, with more than 910,000 display locations worldwide. In addition, Clear Channel owns or manages about 50 TV stations and sells spot advertising for more than 3,300 radio and TV stations through Katz Media. The company has agreed to be taken private by an investment group led by Thomas H. Lee Partners and Bain Capital." [1]

    In August 2006, TheDeal.com reported that Clear Channel "is considering filing a formal petition to the Federal Communications Commission seeking to raise the caps limiting how many stations one company can own in the largest individual U.S. markets." According to the article, the company has 1,189 radio stations, but "wants the FCC to relax a rule that limits a company's radio station ownership in individual markets." A Clear Channel spokesperson said, "Easing the ownership restrictions will help level the playing field and let free radio compete with iPods, online music services and satellite radio. Certainly, seeing that satellite radio has 150 unregulated stations in every market and free radio is limited to just eight shows the apparent disparity." [1]
    http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php/Clear_Channel_Communications

  • @jwmmakerofmusic said:
    Clean Bandit's "Rockabye" is another example, where the lyrics, while simplistic, tell the story of a single mother raising her child. Unusual subject matter for a chart topping hit.

    For me, that song reinforced a stereotype, with the guest singer warbling a horrible repetitive lyric.

    Can't hold a candle to something like 'Love Child' by The Supremes.

  • Because you're getting old.

  • @cian said:
    Because you're getting old.

    :D

  • edited August 7

    @cian said:
    Because you're getting old.

    Undeniably true. But many of those commenting were seeing gigs and buying albums from the best bands in history, creatively and success wise, when Generation X and the Millenials were still wetting their nappies. ;)

  • @cian said:
    Because you're getting old.

    There may be some truth in that, but to my ears, even the pop music before my time (such as American standards, jump rhythm and blues, girl groups, doo wop, crooners, etc... ) sounds better than the product being ground out today.

  • Some of the songs are quite catchy and fun but really the production the last couple years has been really horrible. Of course its loud but lately I've been hearing a lot of very terrible sounds being used as leads and in generally just having annoying things mixed to stand out.

  • Royksopp, to me is like a reference point for modern electronic/pop. Everything is there, writing, sounds, engineering.

    They spend heaps of time mixing and that to me is the key...you need plenty of **time ** to craft something meaningful....especially if your doing a lot of the work yourselves.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6c-RbGZBnBI

  • Because non beauty is in the eye of the beholder too.

  • Now we can listen to all of music history with a couple clicks. Lots of young people in their twenties that I work with who are not particularly music history nerds are into lots of different stuff from lots of different times. I think the pre-net generations tended to look to their musical generation as a source of identity. That just is not the case with young people today and they are free of that narrow BS.

  • edited August 7

    @Cib said:

    @cian said:
    Because you're getting old.

    :D

    Nah. Aside from a few bits I hated the late 70's/80's pop crap when I was a teenager. Krautrock and obscure 70's weirdness did it for me, though I did dye my arse-length hair green when punk was the thing, just to prove I wasn't a complete hippy.

  • I lived in a small town with little access to cool music or people. My formative years were largely contaminated by cheese and corniness.

  • Growing up in the late 60s through the 70s into the early 80s, it's incredible how much of the music I lapped up was actually just heavily imprinted from this:
    https://youtu.be/d727nJUC5Tg

  • edited August 7

    http://youtu.be/uMK0prafzw0

    There is still hope :)

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