Is iOS music professional?

Of course it is...despite some peeps saying that it isn't mostly due to jealously because they have been making music on far more expensive gear lol

I just wanted to say that I'm highly impressed with what I am hearing from many of you and it's inspiring

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Comments

  • iOS music is surely as professional (or some of it unprofessional) as music made in any way, on any platform, or with any instrument. You don't have to like it, but that's just a subjective opinion isn't it? The musical snobs and naysayers will always find something to hate on. Music is mostly about fun and I'm having lots of fun with it....

  • What defines music as professional ? By today's standards would you class an old Robert Johnson recording as professional ? I can get a far clearer and fuller sound than they had available back then, but I wouldn't class anything I do musically as professional, I am not approaching it in what I would call a professional manner....to me it is the purpose and the approach that makes something professional not what is used to do it.

  • Is this a meaningfull question?

    I think it's safe to say, that IOS is usefull for professionals. I see a wide varity of ways to use IOS in professional music production, both in the studio and for live performances.

    Can you make a professional music production solely by using IOS devices and apps?
    Sure you can.

    Is it a viable way to go? Is it being done? Surely!
    Is it for everyone? Probably not.

  • I think mores the question for myself : can iOS be used reliably for professional uses? If I was using iPads in a live environment where I was being paid to perform, I would be quite pleased in general. Some niggling doubts about iOS in a live environment still worries me.

    I was travelling recently and was offline. My iPad still kept bugging me to update to the latest iOS while using it offline! This is totally unacceptable from a standpoint if I was using my iPad live professionally (i.e. As a paid entertainer). The last thing we need is to be taking the risk of updating anything while on the road.

    Apple need to sort this update nagging. We need to be able to choose to turn off any tasks iOS decides to do behind the scenes which are not needed for the use of our devices. Until these sorts of issues are solved, I consider iOS devices able to be a great instrument in theory, but not always in practice.

  • @Fruitbat1919 said:
    I think mores the question for myself : can iOS be used reliably for professional uses? If I was using iPads in a live environment where I was being paid to perform, I would be quite pleased in general. Some niggling doubts about iOS in a live environment still worries me.

    I was travelling recently and was offline. My iPad still kept bugging me to update to the latest iOS while using it offline! This is totally unacceptable from a standpoint if I was using my iPad live professionally (i.e. As a paid entertainer). The last thing we need is to be taking the risk of updating anything while on the road.

    Apple need to sort this update nagging. We need to be able to choose to turn off any tasks iOS decides to do behind the scenes which are not needed for the use of our devices. Until these sorts of issues are solved, I consider iOS devices able to be a great instrument in theory, but not always in practice.

    ^ this

    When Apple build in a pop-up, that links to a lock screen, both having to be closed, that can appear at any time - it renders the device unusable for professional work.

    Maybe I don't want to update yet - because it might make my device run slower, software or hardware stop working. Perhaps I'm in the middle of a gig and it's not really convenient to do so. Or maybe I like things the way they are.

    The arrival of the update nag also seems to coincide with the rotation bug issue I suffer from.

    Until these are sorted, I can't take this thing out for live work, however good it sounds.

  • I'm performing on a big damn stage in 2 hours at Trinity College Dublin, using just iOS gear (alking about the tech inside the performance). Just finished sound check. Feels pretty professional.

  • I believe iOS has professional-grade tools(re. apps). Whether or not iOS music sounds professional depends on the musician.

  • The larger question would seem to be: Is recorded music still a profession?

  • Most music is not professional. Same is true for iOS music.

    (oh, and my music, sorry: this music is not professional, too)

  • encenc
    edited April 12

    Are any "professionals" known to use iOS devices ?

    I believe jarre used iPad music apps on his last album
    And Gorillaz used funk box on a couple of tracks
    There's video evidence of kraftwek using iPads in their live set up

  • "Is iOS music professional?"... you should seek professional advice for that :)

  • @enc said:
    Are any "professionals" known to use iOS devices ?

    I believe jarre used iPad music apps on his last album
    And Gorillaz used funk box on a couple of tracks
    There's video evidence of kraftwek using iPads in their live set up

    In a recent interview Damon Albarn said that half of the new album has been recorded in GarageBand on his iPad. In my eyes you can't get more professional than that

  • @AndyPlankton said:
    What defines music as professional ? By today's standards would you class an old Robert Johnson recording as professional ? I can get a far clearer and fuller sound than they had available back then, but I wouldn't class anything I do musically as professional, I am not approaching it in what I would call a professional manner....to me it is the purpose and the approach that makes something professional not what is used to do it.

    Bing on the Bobby J.

  • Is Seasick Steve's guitar professional?

  • I think you guys are blurring the term 'professional' with the commercial/corporate music industry area.

    There are without doubt, more than thousands of professional musicians and music technology professionals using iOS heavily on a daily basis, all over this earth.

    Right now I'm watching a Korean Taegum player open up todays symposium (sound engineer is mixing on an iPad!) before we go and perform iOS+Khomus music based on traditions of the Sakha Republic. You won't see that on MTV!

  • @OscarSouth said:
    I think you guys are blurring the term 'professional' with the commercial/corporate music industry area.

    There are without doubt, more than thousands of professional musicians and music technology professionals using iOS heavily on a daily basis, all over this earth.

    Right now I'm watching a Korean Taegum player open up todays symposium (sound engineer is mixing on an iPad!) before we go and perform iOS+Khomus music based on traditions of the Sakha Republic. You won't see that on MTV!

    Keep us posted!

  • @OscarSouth said:
    I think you guys are blurring the term 'professional' with the commercial/corporate music industry area.

    There are without doubt, more than thousands of professional musicians and music technology professionals using iOS heavily on a daily basis, all over this earth.

    Right now I'm watching a Korean Taegum player open up todays symposium (sound engineer is mixing on an iPad!) before we go and perform iOS+Khomus music based on traditions of the Sakha Republic. You won't see that on MTV!

    Fingers crossed there isn't an update nag halfway though the Thumbjam solo...

  • edited April 12

    @MonzoPro said:

    @OscarSouth said:
    I think you guys are blurring the term 'professional' with the commercial/corporate music industry area.

    There are without doubt, more than thousands of professional musicians and music technology professionals using iOS heavily on a daily basis, all over this earth.

    Right now I'm watching a Korean Taegum player open up todays symposium (sound engineer is mixing on an iPad!) before we go and perform iOS+Khomus music based on traditions of the Sakha Republic. You won't see that on MTV!

    Fingers crossed there isn't an update nag halfway though the Thumbjam solo...

    Haha. I'm actually just using AUFX Dub/Space/Push, Crystalline, Frekvens and Stereo Designer, with a veeerrry in depth signal routing matrix inside AUM (digital feedback loops!!) and lots and lots of external controls.

    Because there's a lot of analog gear on the stage from our collaborators (analog group called 'Analog On' .. Moogs!!). I've stayed away from sound generation, so that the audience can visibly see that they're doing all the synthesis. I'm processing and resampling my wife's vocals live.

  • edited April 12

    I think Korg makes a lot of money with iOS music so... yes? ;)

    First step would be to write a definition of 'iOS music' then 'professional'. Something tells me the symantec mucky muck would take over.

  • Is music made with an on-screen signing robot professional ? :P

    Now wheres that hiding behind the sofa emoji :D :D :D

  • My 2 cents (maybe worth just one):
    What is iOS music? Is it another genre i´m not aware of? I still wonder why people define their music because of devices and/or OS. Music is music...point!
    Professional music? You can make that with an ukulele or whatever if you want.
    It depends of what kind of music you do.
    Most people seems to talk about electronic music and here i would say iOS can do a lot.
    I still find it much more easy to make "high fidelity" sounds with synths like Zebra 2, Dune 2 and whatever monster synths for desktop.
    With some good extern FX and mastering a listener won´t hear a different anyway trough crappy Beatz or Apple headphones listening compressed files.
    Do you want to score a movie, making soundtrack or trailer, need surround sound and high quality reverbs and other obscure FX and large sample libraries etc, no way to do it on iOS on this level.
    Back to "iOS music". If i f.e. record a guitar into iOS, mangle it trough an app and use some loops from an app (which where made with hardware and processed with professional mastering tools etc. anyway mostly), is this iOS music?
    There are for sure a lot professionals using iPads as sound source, midi controller, performence tools etc. But is that important in any way for the music or listener.
    At the end it´s a computer. That´s it. I wont´t praise an OS made by a consumer oriented company and call music "iOS music".
    Do you think i´m talking nonsense.....maybe :D
    Music is music!

  • @AndyPlankton said:
    Is music made with an on-screen signing robot professional ? :P

    Now wheres that hiding behind the sofa emoji :D :D :D

    Makes a note for when that day comes/revolution/wall/Bebot Overlords etc

  • If you want it to be, YES. Great music is great music. If it is accaplla or it comes from machines.

  • @OscarSouth said:

    @MonzoPro said:

    @OscarSouth said:
    I think you guys are blurring the term 'professional' with the commercial/corporate music industry area.

    There are without doubt, more than thousands of professional musicians and music technology professionals using iOS heavily on a daily basis, all over this earth.

    Right now I'm watching a Korean Taegum player open up todays symposium (sound engineer is mixing on an iPad!) before we go and perform iOS+Khomus music based on traditions of the Sakha Republic. You won't see that on MTV!

    Fingers crossed there isn't an update nag halfway though the Thumbjam solo...

    Haha. I'm actually just using AUFX Dub/Space/Push, Crystalline, Frekvens and Stereo Designer, with a veeerrry in depth signal routing matrix inside AUM (digital feedback loops!!) and lots and lots of external controls.

    Because there's a lot of analog gear on the stage from our collaborators (analog group called 'Analog On' .. Moogs!!). I've stayed away from sound generation, so that the audience can visibly see that they're doing all the synthesis. I'm processing and resampling my wife's vocals live.

    Would love to hear/see a vid if you do one, sounds great!

  • @AudioGus said:
    I think Korg makes a lot of money with iOS music so... yes? ;)

    First step would be to write a definition of 'iOS music' then 'professional'. Something tells me the symantec mucky muck would take over.

    I define iOS music as music made only with iOS apps from start to finish including mastering etc

  • iOS music is not a genre as far as I'm concerned..it is music made exclusively with the iOS apps we love

  • Btw..by professional I mean..it sounds like it could be played on radio or clubs etc...in other words fully, polished tracks

  • @supadom said:
    Is Seasick Steve's guitar professional?

    https://youtu.be/xw3KxF9pxso

    Nothing more to say

  • Funny, I just posted the following on the Auria forum:
    _
    I think "traditional" users of DAWs and many developers failed to realize the impact of Ableton Live, and the way it was a game changer.

    **Full disclosure here: I hate Ableton live, I abhor clip launching and the so-called "live perfomances" that rely on it and reminds me of DJ'ing, and a DJ is NOT a musician. **

    That said, is a matter of fact the turntables approach, the clip launcher, auto time sync and other Ableton Live's features have been already for a while appealing to both the casual user and the musician that has the desire to compose music jamming, instead of doing old-school stricturing, arranging and editing. Couple that with the fact that making good music out of loops and electronic synths require a good discriminating taste, but not really music training or instrument skills, and you'll see the dimension of the problem.

    What happens is a legion of people with an Ableton Live (or its iOS quasi-counterpart, Korg Gadget) background takes that seamless and no-skills-or-training-required workflow for granted, as well as the ability of taking the DAW to the stage, enabling them to perform and record live, and approach the major iOS linear DAWs with this kind of expectations. Of course, that would only end up in frustration, and with the top dog iOS linear DAW, which is Auria, you can expect top dog frustration as well.

    The text became larger than I wanted, but I simply couldn't be more concise to show my point. I think, and worry about it, that many DAWs, iOS or otherwise, may find wise to take pages from Ableton Live to be apealing to this new kind of musician that sometimes is almost a DJ (meaning almost not a musician) to stay relevant, but by doing so, they would end up making things worse for us, the old school arrangers, composers and the professional mixing and mastering engineers. There is a Pro niche, but it is, indeed, a niche. So I never, and will never, disparage Rim or his work, because he remains commited to a niche, our niche, in a hostile platform, which is iOS._

  • TLDR - there's of course a professional music niche in iOS, as with any other platform.

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