Why is fiddlewax not in the UK store?

«1

Comments

  • 44 Comments sorted by Date Votes
  • Firo
    32bit

  • Not in US store either....matter of fact it doesn't show in the my purchased section either; that's something I've not seen before.

  • Every developer that not pay the annual fee will be kicked out of Appstore...

  • @ErrkaPetti said:
    Every developer that not pay the annual fee will be kicked out of Appstore...

    Then Apple should automatically refund all the customers

  • i sense something more ominous. the website for fiddle-wax seems to not work either. it might be the developer decided to wipe all traces of it. luckily i have a backup on my pc that is now stored in my dropbox just to be safe.

  • Saddy sad. One of my favorites. He'd said he would at least keep it compatible, but I suppose the 64 bit thing was the final straw.

  • Now. Onward and upwards. Someone please take all his good ideas and put them to use again. Better. Stronger. Faster.

    @SecretBaseDesign ?

  • @ccs2 said:
    Firo
    32bit

    Alas not in the Aussie app store either. I picked this up relatively recently, I quite like it ... shame it will go the way of the Dodo in the next major iOS update. To be honest if I was the dev I think I'd be justified in letting it slide

  • Wiped from the german store (and my purchase list)as well.Too bad,i really like this app but since i got it for free theres not much i can complain about...

  • 'cause courage........

  • A bit of a shame this App never got a few further refinements and sad if it's discontinued now.
    Great App and Lovely Dev. :(

  • Well... It took a long time for us to notice... there's a comment on the developer blog reporting this to him 2 weeks ago (no response). who knows for how long the apps have not been there.

    Maybe contacting the developer via twitter?, he seems to have moved on entirely not only from iOS but from software development entirely... might be worth the shot nonetheless.

    I liked the app for what it was even if I only used it sparingly, it had some music theory "mistakes" (the 13th When it's used on the chord formed over the sixth grade of a major scale it's raised a semitone so it's sounds like a 13th otherwise it's just the first inversión of the major seventh chord formed over the fourth grade of the scale and on the top of that the way the app arranged the chord made it sound really dissonant, lots of other minor mistakes like that) but it was good for most simple stuff.

  • @adamkumpf is the dev I do believe. Very nice chap.

  • Apple say '32 bit dead' does this mean anything 32bit or less has to be consumed by the ever increasing landfill earth?

  • @thinds said:
    @adamkumpf is the dev I do believe. Very nice chap.

    Yep. Lovely guy. Good app.

    Nothing lasts forever though :)

  • I always thought that an app once bought will always be available. Has Apple changed policy?

  • edited February 14 Vote Up0

    @mannix said:
    I always thought that an app once bought will always be available. Has Apple changed policy?

    no,it was like this before.Although it happened only a very few times to me.

  • edited February 14 Vote Up0

    @mannix said:
    I always thought that an app once bought will always be available. Has Apple changed policy?

    No. We agreed to this in the 31 (or whatever it was on that day) -page TOS that we all read and agreed to when we agreed to use the app store and download apps.

    Oh, wait, we didn't read it ?!?!? :smiley: We just hit "Agree" right?

    Here's the currently relevant part. (The relevant part has changed over time - this is, as I read it, what is the current catch all that allows this):

    "Apple further reserves the right to modify, suspend, or discontinue the Services (or any part or Content thereof) at any time with or without notice to you, and Apple will not be liable to you or to any third party should it exercise such rights."

    The full document can be found here:

    http://www.apple.com/legal/internet-services/itunes/us/terms.html

    However, the fact that Apple is doing this and of course taking many by surprise is something that is going to cause a significant degree of consternation and, yes, in many other circumstances, removing from one what one has already paid for access to with an expectation of perpetual access would be deemed theft.

    However it's no different in essence than Barnes and Noble or Amazon removing books from eReaders.

    I "lost" about 40 ebooks (about $200 of ebooks) from my eReader days when B&N bought out eReader and transferred them to Nook (Nook app on iOS).

    Thankfully I still have the (32-bit !!! Ha! ) eReader Windoze application that will still run on 64-bit Windoze 10 (Apple - take note - there's no reason to prevent 32-bit apps from running on iOS - yes - some code bloat but nothing we're currently noticing and we're currently able to run 32-bit apps because both libraries are on iOS.)

    We have not paid for the software (ever - in any circumstance). We have only licensed the ability to use it.

    However, unlike a lot of desktop software, where one pays for a perpetual right to use - hence why I can still run 16 and 32-bit apps from '95 on Windoze 10 and don't have to relicense them (and they won't go away) - and, why, I don't pay Avid or Slate for any subscription services (subscriptions - just say "No!" :smile: ) but only perpetual right to use licenses which won't somehow "evaporate" when I want to be able to install them on a new system - on iOS according to the TOS, we have already given Apple the right to do this at any time

    So, we're in part at fault for using iOS under those TOS and not saying no to that agreement. Of course if we said no to the agreement we wouldn't have any apps on our iDevices apart from what they came with.

    Catch 22.

    OTOH, if a lot of people say something loudly enough to Apple then Apple might listen and back peddle on this. If we say nothing, nothing will happen. If we say something something might happen. I have already reported my concern about this kind of thing to Apple and I'd urge all of us to do the same. (See my other thread earlier about "What favorite 32-bit music apps are you going to miss?" )

    https://forum.audiob.us/discussion/17193/what-favorite-32-bit-music-apps-are-you-going-to-miss#latest

  • @MusicInclusive said:

    @mannix said:
    I always thought that an app once bought will always be available. Has Apple changed policy?

    No. We agreed to this in the 31 (or whatever it was on that day) -page TOS that we all read and agreed to when we agreed to use the app store and download apps.

    Oh, wait, we didn't read it ?!?!? :smiley: We just hit "Agree" right?

    Here's the currently relevant part. (The relevant part has changed over time - this is, as I read it, what is the current catch all that allows this):

    "Apple further reserves the right to modify, suspend, or discontinue the Services (or any part or Content thereof) at any time with or without notice to you, and Apple will not be liable to you or to any third party should it exercise such rights."

    The full document can be found here:

    http://www.apple.com/legal/internet-services/itunes/us/terms.html

    However, the fact that Apple is doing this and of course taking many by surprise is something that is going to cause a significant degree of consternation and, yes, in many other circumstances, removing from one what one has already paid for access to with an expectation of perpetual access would be deemed theft.

    However it's no different in essence than Barnes and Noble or Amazon removing books from eReaders.

    I "lost" about 40 ebooks (about $200 of ebooks) from my eReader days when B&N bought out eReader and transferred them to Nook (Nook app on iOS).

    Thankfully I still have the (32-bit !!! Ha! ) eReader Windoze application that will still run on 64-bit Windoze 10 (Apple - take note - there's no reason to prevent 32-bit apps from running on iOS - yes - some code bloat but nothing we're currently noticing and we're currently able to run 32-bit apps because both libraries are on iOS.)

    We have not paid for the software (ever - in any circumstance). We have only licensed the ability to use it.

    However, unlike a lot of desktop software, where one pays for a perpetual right to use - hence why I can still run 16 and 32-bit apps from '95 on Windoze 10 and don't have to relicense them (and they won't go away) - and, why, I don't pay Avid or Slate for any subscription services (subscriptions - just say "No!" :smile: ) but only perpetual right to use licenses which won't somehow "evaporate" when I want to be able to install them on a new system - on iOS according to the TOS, we have already given Apple the right to do this at any time

    So, we're in part at fault for using iOS under those TOS and not saying no to that agreement. Of course if we said no to the agreement we wouldn't have any apps on our iDevices apart from what they came with.

    Catch 22.

    OTOH, if a lot of people say something loudly enough to Apple then Apple might listen and back peddle on this. If we say nothing, nothing will happen. If we say something something might happen. I have already reported my concern about this kind of thing to Apple and I'd urge all of us to do the same. (See my other thread earlier about "What favorite 32-bit music apps are you going to miss?" )

    https://forum.audiob.us/discussion/17193/what-favorite-32-bit-music-apps-are-you-going-to-miss#latest

    Does this mean that 32bit iOS devices become complete trash?

  • @mannix said:
    Does this mean that 32bit iOS devices become complete trash?

    No, 5 years from now they will run exactly as good as they do today. They simply won't recieve any new software.

  • edited February 14 Vote Up0

    @brambos said:

    @mannix said:
    Does this mean that 32bit iOS devices become complete trash?

    No, 5 years from now they will run exactly as good as they do today. They simply won't recieve any new software.

    Exactly. BUT, however, they will be the only ones capable of running any 32-bit apps that you want to keep around.

    So, one won't be able to run those in AB chains or as IAA on any shiny new iPads even though they run just fine on those shiny new iPads right now (until Apple remove them from the App store or invalidate them completely in iOS 11 being (we think) 64-bit only). That's a problem for some... (Standalone Alchemy for example)

  • Heh! The irony is that the older iPad 1s and 2s and 3s and mini 1s and so on - 32 bit devices - will be the only ones capable of running the software that Apple is now telling us "may slow down our iPad"... Sigh :smiley:

  • @MusicInclusive said:
    Heh! The irony is that the older iPad 1s and 2s and 3s and mini 1s and so on - 32 bit devices - will be the only ones capable of running the software that Apple is now telling us "may slow down our iPad"... Sigh :smiley:

    But if you don't have those 32 bit apps back upped, will they still be available for download on those 32-bit devices. I can think of a script that Apple says those old iOS devices are no longer supported so we will also take down the possibilty to download them. Hence my question will this 32-bit devices become trash?

  • Make a full backup of your old device on a Mac or Windows PC. You'll be able to keep and restore everything on there, indefinitely. Even if your device dies and you want to replace it with another identical one.

  • @mannix said:

    @MusicInclusive said:
    Heh! The irony is that the older iPad 1s and 2s and 3s and mini 1s and so on - 32 bit devices - will be the only ones capable of running the software that Apple is now telling us "may slow down our iPad"... Sigh :smiley:

    But if you don't have those 32 bit apps back upped, will they still be available for download on those 32-bit devices. I can think of a script that Apple says those old iOS devices are no longer supported so we will also take down the possibilty to download them. Hence my question will this 32-bit devices become trash?

    Back them up and the ipas will be available locally. When this whole thing first broke last year, I did a complete download of all the apps I am interested in to an iPad, and then a complete backup transferring the purchases to macOS. That way you have it all locally even when they disappear.

  • @busker said:
    Make a full backup of your old device on a Mac or Windows PC. You'll be able to keep and restore everything on there, indefinitely. Even if your device dies and you want to replace it with another identical one.

    I suppose the good thing about this is that there is likely to be an ample supply of 32-bit iPads in the 2nd hand market for a good while to come! :smiley:

  • @MusicInclusive said:

    @mannix said:

    @MusicInclusive said:
    Heh! The irony is that the older iPad 1s and 2s and 3s and mini 1s and so on - 32 bit devices - will be the only ones capable of running the software that Apple is now telling us "may slow down our iPad"... Sigh :smiley:

    But if you don't have those 32 bit apps back upped, will they still be available for download on those 32-bit devices. I can think of a script that Apple says those old iOS devices are no longer supported so we will also take down the possibilty to download them. Hence my question will this 32-bit devices become trash?

    Back them up and the ipas will be available locally. When this whole thing first broke last year, I did a complete download of all the apps I am interested in to an iPad, and then a complete backup transferring the purchases to macOS. That way you have it all locally even when they disappear.

    Thx! :)

  • @MusicInclusive said:

    @mannix said:
    I always thought that an app once bought will always be available. Has Apple changed policy?

    No. We agreed to this in the 31 (or whatever it was on that day) -page TOS that we all read and agreed to when we agreed to use the app store and download apps.

    Oh, wait, we didn't read it ?!?!? :smiley: We just hit "Agree" right?

    Here's the currently relevant part. (The relevant part has changed over time - this is, as I read it, what is the current catch all that allows this):

    "Apple further reserves the right to modify, suspend, or discontinue the Services (or any part or Content thereof) at any time with or without notice to you, and Apple will not be liable to you or to any third party should it exercise such rights."

    The full document can be found here:

    http://www.apple.com/legal/internet-services/itunes/us/terms.html

    However, the fact that Apple is doing this and of course taking many by surprise is something that is going to cause a significant degree of consternation and, yes, in many other circumstances, removing from one what one has already paid for access to with an expectation of perpetual access would be deemed theft.

    However it's no different in essence than Barnes and Noble or Amazon removing books from eReaders.

    I "lost" about 40 ebooks (about $200 of ebooks) from my eReader days when B&N bought out eReader and transferred them to Nook (Nook app on iOS).

    Thankfully I still have the (32-bit !!! Ha! ) eReader Windoze application that will still run on 64-bit Windoze 10 (Apple - take note - there's no reason to prevent 32-bit apps from running on iOS - yes - some code bloat but nothing we're currently noticing and we're currently able to run 32-bit apps because both libraries are on iOS.)

    We have not paid for the software (ever - in any circumstance). We have only licensed the ability to use it.

    However, unlike a lot of desktop software, where one pays for a perpetual right to use - hence why I can still run 16 and 32-bit apps from '95 on Windoze 10 and don't have to relicense them (and they won't go away) - and, why, I don't pay Avid or Slate for any subscription services (subscriptions - just say "No!" :smile: ) but only perpetual right to use licenses which won't somehow "evaporate" when I want to be able to install them on a new system - on iOS according to the TOS, we have already given Apple the right to do this at any time

    So, we're in part at fault for using iOS under those TOS and not saying no to that agreement. Of course if we said no to the agreement we wouldn't have any apps on our iDevices apart from what they came with.

    Catch 22.

    OTOH, if a lot of people say something loudly enough to Apple then Apple might listen and back peddle on this. If we say nothing, nothing will happen. If we say something something might happen. I have already reported my concern about this kind of thing to Apple and I'd urge all of us to do the same. (See my other thread earlier about "What favorite 32-bit music apps are you going to miss?" )

    https://forum.audiob.us/discussion/17193/what-favorite-32-bit-music-apps-are-you-going-to-miss#latest

    Jajaja. So much drama, it's firo (fiddlewax) 32 bit? The last update was December 2015 I think the cutoff from Apple was earlier than that? (I remember it was June 2015). It must be 64 bit.

    I mean...In general you're right but most of what you wrote doesn't apply to this particular app.

  • @Lacm1993 said:

    Jajaja. So much drama, it's firo (fiddlewax) 32 bit? The last update was December 2015 I think the cutoff from Apple was earlier than that? (I remember it was June 2015). It must be 64 bit.

    I mean...In general you're right but most of what you wrote doesn't apply to this particular app.

    I still use it. It's still useful to me and to others. It's one of a number, not just in isolation.

    See the other thread for a list of other apps that are affected like this.

Sign In or Register to comment.